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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214437/chempreview-an-augmented-reality-based-molecular-interface
#1
Min Zheng, Mark P Waller
Human computer interfaces make computational science more comprehensible and impactful. Complex 3D structures such as proteins or DNA are magnified by digital representations and displayed on two-dimensional monitors. Augmented reality has recently opened another door to access the virtual three-dimensional world. Herein, we present an augmented reality application called ChemPreview with the potential to manipulate bio-molecular structures at an atomistic level. ChemPreview is available at https://github.com/wallerlab/chem-preview/releases, and is built on top of the Meta 1 platform https://www...
January 31, 2017: Journal of Molecular Graphics & Modelling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28212388/multiple-processes-in-two-dimensional-visual-statistical-learning
#2
Eiichi Hoshino, Ken Mogi
Knowledge about the arrangement of visual elements is an important aspect of perception. This study investigates whether humans learn rules of two-dimensional abstract patterns (exemplars) generated from Reber's artificial grammar. The key question is whether the subjects can implicitly learn them without explicit instructions, and, if so, how they use the acquired knowledge to judge new patterns (probes) in relation to their finite experience of the exemplars. The analysis was conducted using dissimilarities among patterns, which are defined with n-gram probabilities and the Levenshtein distance...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28205496/planning-functional-grasps-of-simple-tools-invokes-the-hand-independent-praxis-representation-network-an-fmri-study
#3
Łukasz Przybylski, Gregory Króliczak
OBJECTIVES: Neuropsychological and neuroimaging evidence indicates that tool use knowledge and abilities are represented in the praxis representation network (PRN) of the left cerebral hemisphere. We investigated whether PRN would also underlie the planning of function-appropriate grasps of tools, even though such an assumption is inconsistent with some neuropsychological evidence for independent representations of tool grasping and skilled tool use. METHODS: Twenty right-handed participants were tested in an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study wherein they planned functionally appropriate grasps of tools versus grasps of non-tools matched for size and/or complexity, and later executed the pantomimed grasps of these objects...
February 2017: Journal of the International Neuropsychological Society: JINS
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203635/grounded-understanding-of-abstract-concepts-the-case-of-stem-learning
#4
REVIEW
Justin C Hayes, David J M Kraemer
Characterizing the neural implementation of abstract conceptual representations has long been a contentious topic in cognitive science. At the heart of the debate is whether the "sensorimotor" machinery of the brain plays a central role in representing concepts, or whether the involvement of these perceptual and motor regions is merely peripheral or epiphenomenal. The domain of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) learning provides an important proving ground for sensorimotor (or grounded) theories of cognition, as concepts in science and engineering courses are often taught through laboratory-based and other hands-on methodologies...
2017: Cogn Res Princ Implic
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202719/sleep-enhances-knowledge-of-routes-and-regions-in-spatial-environments
#5
Hannes Noack, Wiebke Schick, Hanspeter Mallot, Jan Born
Sleep is thought to preferentially consolidate hippocampus-dependent memory, and as such, spatial navigation. Here, we investigated the effects of sleep on route knowledge and explicit and implicit semantic regions in a virtual environment. Sleep, compared with wakefulness, improved route knowledge and also enhanced awareness of the semantic regionalization within the environment, whereas signs of implicit regionalization remained unchanged. Results support the view that sleep specifically enhances explicit aspects of memory, also in the spatial domain...
March 2017: Learning & Memory
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28202102/how-lives-became-lists-and-scientific-papers-became-data-cataloguing-authorship-during-the-nineteenth-century
#6
Alex Csiszar
The Catalogue of Scientific Papers, published by the Royal Society of London beginning in 1867, projected back to the beginning of the nineteenth century a novel vision of the history of science in which knowledge was built up out of discrete papers each connected to an author. Its construction was an act of canon formation that helped naturalize the idea that scientific publishing consisted of special kinds of texts and authors that were set apart from the wider landscape of publishing. By recovering the decisions and struggles through which the Catalogue was assembled, this essay aims to contribute to current efforts to denaturalize the scientific paper as the dominant genre of scientific life...
February 16, 2017: British Journal for the History of Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28198674/sequence-specific-bias-correction-for-rna-seq-data-using-recurrent-neural-networks
#7
Yao-Zhong Zhang, Rui Yamaguchi, Seiya Imoto, Satoru Miyano
BACKGROUND: The recent success of deep learning techniques in machine learning and artificial intelligence has stimulated a great deal of interest among bioinformaticians, who now wish to bring the power of deep learning to bare on a host of bioinformatical problems. Deep learning is ideally suited for biological problems that require automatic or hierarchical feature representation for biological data when prior knowledge is limited. In this work, we address the sequence-specific bias correction problem for RNA-seq data redusing Recurrent Neural Networks (RNNs) to model nucleotide sequences without pre-determining sequence structures...
January 25, 2017: BMC Genomics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28198077/translation-strategies-contradiction-and-the-theory-of-social-representations-why-discussing-needles-may-improve-blood-donor-retention
#8
Gail Moloney, Jane Hayman, Marguerite Gamble, Geoff Smith, Rob Hall
Retaining blood donors is a cost-effective way of ensuring a safe blood supply, yet despite the plethora of research, only 5.1% of the eligible population in Australia donate blood and 40% of these do not make a second donation. We offer an alternative to traditional approaches by conceptualizing blood donation within social representations theory as socially derived symbolic knowledge with a specific focus on cognitive polyphasia and Guimelli's (1998) normative and functional dimensions. An online survey, completed by 703 residents from NSW Australia, comprised a blood donation word association task, Likert-style questions constructed from previous word association data and contextualized blood donation statements...
February 15, 2017: British Journal of Social Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196576/care-coordination-from-a-strengths-perspective-a-practice-based-evidence-evaluation-of-evidence-based-practice
#9
Karen A Monsen, Catherine E Vanderboom, Kirstie S Olson, Mary E Larson, Diane E Holland
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: It is critical to accurately represent strengths interventions to improve data and enable intervention effectiveness research from a strengths perspective. However, it is challenging to understand strengths interventions from the multiple perspectives of computerized knowledge representation, evidence-based practice guidelines, and practice-based evidence narratives. Intervention phrases abstracted from nurse care coordinator practice narratives described strengths interventions with community-dwelling elders...
February 1, 2017: Research and Theory for Nursing Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28194104/electrophysiological-correlates-of-error-monitoring-and-feedback-processing-in-second-language-learning
#10
Sybrine Bultena, Claudia Danielmeier, Harold Bekkering, Kristin Lemhöfer
Humans monitor their behavior to optimize performance, which presumably relies on stable representations of correct responses. During second language (L2) learning, however, stable representations have yet to be formed while knowledge of the first language (L1) can interfere with learning, which in some cases results in persistent errors. In order to examine how correct L2 representations are stabilized, this study examined performance monitoring in the learning process of second language learners for a feature that conflicts with their first language...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28189034/direct-and-indirect-influences-of-executive-functions-on-mathematics-achievement
#11
Lucy Cragg, Sarah Keeble, Sophie Richardson, Hannah E Roome, Camilla Gilmore
Achievement in mathematics is predicted by an individual's domain-specific factual knowledge, procedural skill and conceptual understanding as well as domain-general executive function skills. In this study we investigated the extent to which executive function skills contribute to these three components of mathematical knowledge, whether this mediates the relationship between executive functions and overall mathematics achievement, and if these relationships change with age. Two hundred and ninety-three participants aged between 8 and 25years completed a large battery of mathematics and executive function tests...
February 8, 2017: Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28183861/tool-selection-and-the-ventral-dorsal-organization-of-tool-related-knowledge
#12
Michael J Tobia, Christopher R Madan
Tool selection is a cognitive process necessary for tool use, and may rely on distinct knowledge under different conditions. This fMRI experiment was designed to identify neural substrates mediating tool selection under different conditions. Participants performed a picture-matching task that presented a recipient object and an action-goal, and required the selection of the best tool object from among four candidates. Some trials allowed selection of the prototypical tool, whereas others forced selection of either a functionally substitutable or impossible tool...
February 2017: Physiological Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28177308/an-editor-for-the-generation-and-customization-of-geometry-restraints
#13
Nigel W Moriarty, Eli J Draizen, Paul D Adams
Chemical restraints for use in macromolecular structure refinement are produced by a variety of methods, including a number of programs that use chemical information to generate the required bond, angle, dihedral, chiral and planar restraints. These programs help to automate the process and therefore minimize the errors that could otherwise occur if it were performed manually. Furthermore, restraint-dictionary generation programs can incorporate chemical and other prior knowledge to provide reasonable choices of types and values...
February 1, 2017: Acta Crystallographica. Section D, Structural Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28174527/spatial-navigation-and-the-central-complex-sensory-acquisition-orientation-and-motor-control
#14
REVIEW
Adrienn G Varga, Nicholas D Kathman, Joshua P Martin, Peiyuan Guo, Roy E Ritzmann
Cockroaches are scavengers that forage through dark, maze-like environments. Like other foraging animals, for instance rats, they must continually asses their situation to keep track of targets and negotiate barriers. While navigating a complex environment, all animals need to integrate sensory information in order to produce appropriate motor commands. The integrated sensory cues can be used to provide the animal with an environmental and contextual reference frame for the behavior. To successfully reach a goal location, navigational cues continuously derived from sensory inputs have to be utilized in the spatial guidance of motor commands...
2017: Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28173964/sleep-deprivation-disrupts-the-contribution-of-the-hippocampus-to-the-formation-of-novel-lexical-associations
#15
Virginie Sterpenich, Leonardo Ceravolo, Sophie Schwartz
Sleep is involved in the mechanisms underlying memory consolidation and brain plasticity. Consolidation refers to a process through which labile memories are reorganized into more stable ones. An intriguing but often neglected question concerns how pre-existing knowledge is modified when new information enters memory, and whether sleep can influence this process. We investigated how nonword learning may modify the neural representations of closely-related existing words. We also tested whether sleep contributes to any such effect by comparing a group of participants who slept during the night following a first encoding session to a sleep deprived group...
February 4, 2017: Brain and Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28169420/parents-and-informal-caregivers-views-and-experiences-of-communication-about-routine-childhood-vaccination-a-synthesis-of-qualitative-evidence
#16
REVIEW
Heather Mr Ames, Claire Glenton, Simon Lewin
BACKGROUND: Childhood vaccination is an effective way to prevent serious childhood illnesses, but many children do not receive all the recommended vaccines. There are various reasons for this; some parents lack access because of poor quality health services, long distances or lack of money. Other parents may not trust vaccines or the healthcare workers who provide them, or they may not see the need for vaccination due to a lack of information or misinformation about how vaccinations work and the diseases they can prevent...
February 7, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28167394/deep-ensemble-learning-of-sparse-regression-models-for-brain-disease-diagnosis
#17
Heung-Il Suk, Seong-Whan Lee, Dinggang Shen
Recent studies on brain imaging analysis witnessed the core roles of machine learning techniques in computer-assisted intervention for brain disease diagnosis. Of various machine-learning techniques, sparse regression models have proved their effectiveness in handling high-dimensional data but with a small number of training samples, especially in medical problems. In the meantime, deep learning methods have been making great successes by outperforming the state-of-the-art performances in various applications...
January 24, 2017: Medical Image Analysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28163139/automaticity-of-phonological-and-semantic-processing-during-visual-word-recognition
#18
Chotiga Pattamadilok, Valérie Chanoine, Christophe Pallier, Jean-Luc Anton, Bruno Nazarian, Pascal Belin, Johannes C Ziegler
Reading involves activation of phonological and semantic knowledge. Yet, the automaticity of the activation of these representations remains subject to debate. The present study addressed this issue by examining how different brain areas involved in language processing responded to a manipulation of bottom-up (level of visibility) and top-down information (task demands) applied to written words. The analyses showed that the same brain areas were activated in response to written words whether the task was symbol detection, rime detection, or semantic judgment...
February 3, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28155718/improved-protein-protein-interactions-prediction-via-weighted-sparse-representation-model-combining-continuous-wavelet-descriptor-and-pseaa-composition
#19
Yu-An Huang, Zhu-Hong You, Xing Chen, Gui-Ying Yan
BACKGROUND: Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are essential to most biological processes. Since bioscience has entered into the era of genome and proteome, there is a growing demand for the knowledge about PPI network. High-throughput biological technologies can be used to identify new PPIs, but they are expensive, time-consuming, and tedious. Therefore, computational methods for predicting PPIs have an important role. For the past years, an increasing number of computational methods such as protein structure-based approaches have been proposed for predicting PPIs...
December 23, 2016: BMC Systems Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28152942/communities-of-practice-a-jurisdictional-approach-to-improving-the-quality-of-care-in-radiation-medicine-in-ontario
#20
Michelle Ang, Lindsay Elizabeth Reddeman, Michael Sharpe, Margaret Hart, Carina Simniceanu, Stephen Breen, Joon-Hyung J Kim, Dani Scott, Khaled Zaza, David D'Souza, Michael F Milosevic, Stewart Gaede, Andrea Marshall, Brian P Yaremko, Katharina Sixel, Nicole Harnett, Eric Gutierrez, Padraig Richard Warde
: 122 Background: The Radiation Treatment Program (RTP) at Cancer Care Ontario (CCO) established several Communities of Practice (CoPs), with the goal of improving radiation treatment (RT) quality and safety. The RTP identifies variation in practice and quality improvement (QI) opportunities in the 14 Regional Cancer Centres (RCCs) and facilitates the development of CoPs to share best practices and standardize care. METHODS: Since 2010, the RTP has formed 7 CoPs ( > 185 members in total): 4 intra-disciplinary (Radiation Therapy, Medical Physics, Advanced Practice Radiation Therapy, Radiation Safety) and 3 inter-disciplinary (Head and Neck (HN), Gynecological (GYNE) and Lung Cancer)...
March 2016: Journal of Clinical Oncology: Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
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