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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27935031/interictal-epileptiform-discharges-impair-word-recall-in-multiple-brain-areas
#1
Peter C Horak, Stephen Meisenhelter, Yinchen Song, Markus E Testorf, Michael J Kahana, Weston D Viles, Krzysztof A Bujarski, Andrew C Connolly, Ashlee A Robbins, Michael R Sperling, Ashwini D Sharan, Gregory A Worrell, Laura R Miller, Robert E Gross, Kathryn A Davis, David W Roberts, Bradley Lega, Sameer A Sheth, Kareem A Zaghloul, Joel M Stein, Sandhitsu R Das, Daniel S Rizzuto, Barbara C Jobst
OBJECTIVES: Interictal epileptiform discharges (IEDs) have been linked to memory impairment, but the spatial and temporal dynamics of this relationship remain elusive. In the present study, we aim to systematically characterize the brain areas and times at which IEDs affect memory. METHODS: Eighty epilepsy patients participated in a delayed free recall task while undergoing intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring. We analyzed the locations and timing of IEDs relative to the behavioral data in order to measure their effects on memory...
December 9, 2016: Epilepsia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27934542/the-impact-of-aging-on-associative-memory-for-preexisting-unitized-associations
#2
Emma Delhaye, Christine Bastin
Aging is accompanied by a decline in associative memory that can, however, be attenuated when associations are unitized at encoding, that is, when they form an integrated entity. Unitization is thought to promote familiarity-based recognition memory, which is preserved in aging. We examined whether preexperimentally unitized associations (compound words (CWs)) do indeed reduce age differences in memory, and whether preexperimental unitization promotes familiarity. In Experiment 1, we assessed the memory of 20 young and 20 older participants for compound versus unrelated word pairs using a yes/no recognition test with Remember/Know/Guess judgments...
December 9, 2016: Neuropsychology, Development, and Cognition. Section B, Aging, Neuropsychology and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27925283/haloperidol-increases-false-recognition-memory-of-thematically-related-pictures-in-healthy-volunteers
#3
Regina V Guarnieri, Luciano G Buratto, Carlos F A Gomes, Rafaela L Ribeiro, Altay A Lino de Souza, Lilian M Stein, José C Galduróz, Orlando F A Bueno
Dopamine can modulate long-term episodic memory. Its potential role on the generation of false memories, however, is less well known. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment, 24 young healthy volunteers ingested a 4-mg oral dose of haloperidol, a dopamine D2 -receptor antagonist, or placebo, before taking part in a recognition memory task. Haloperidol was active during both study and test phases of the experiment. Participants in the haloperidol group produced more false recognition responses than those in the placebo group, despite similar levels of correct recognition...
December 7, 2016: Human Psychopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27923496/neural-correlates-of-rdoc-reward-constructs-in-adolescents-with-diverse-psychiatric-symptoms-a-reward-flanker-task-pilot-study
#4
Kailyn A L Bradley, Julia A C Case, Rachel D Freed, Emily R Stern, Vilma Gabbay
BACKGROUND: There has been growing interest under the Research Domain Criteria initiative to investigate behavioral constructs and their underlying neural circuitry. Abnormalities in reward processes are salient across psychiatric conditions and may precede future psychopathology in youth. However, the neural circuitry underlying such deficits has not been well defined. Therefore, in this pilot, we studied youth with diverse psychiatric symptoms and examined the neural underpinnings of reward anticipation, attainment, and positive prediction error (PPE, unexpected reward gain)...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Affective Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27918908/likelihood-ratio-sequential-sampling-models-of-recognition-memory
#5
Adam F Osth, Simon Dennis, Andrew Heathcote
The mirror effect - a phenomenon whereby a manipulation produces opposite effects on hit and false alarm rates - is benchmark regularity of recognition memory. A likelihood ratio decision process, basing recognition on the relative likelihood that a stimulus is a target or a lure, naturally predicts the mirror effect, and so has been widely adopted in quantitative models of recognition memory. Glanzer, Hilford, and Maloney (2009) demonstrated that likelihood ratio models, assuming Gaussian memory strength, are also capable of explaining regularities observed in receiver-operating characteristics (ROCs), such as greater target than lure variance...
December 2, 2016: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27918169/flexible-retrieval-when-true-inferences-produce-false-memories
#6
Alexis C Carpenter, Daniel L Schacter
Episodic memory involves flexible retrieval processes that allow us to link together distinct episodes, make novel inferences across overlapping events, and recombine elements of past experiences when imagining future events. However, the same flexible retrieval and recombination processes that underpin these adaptive functions may also leave memory prone to error or distortion, such as source misattributions in which details of one event are mistakenly attributed to another related event. To determine whether the same recombination-related retrieval mechanism supports both successful inference and source memory errors, we developed a modified version of an associative inference paradigm in which participants encoded everyday scenes comprised of people, objects, and other contextual details...
December 5, 2016: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917021/the-impact-of-testing-on-the-formation-of-children-s-and-adults-false-memories
#7
Nathalie Brackmann, Henry Otgaar, Melanie Sauerland, Mark L Howe
Witnesses are frequently questioned immediately following a crime. The effects of such testing on false recall are inconclusive: Testing may inoculate against subsequent misinformation or enhance false memory formation. We examined whether different types of processing can account for these discrepancies. Drawing from Fuzzy-trace and Associative-activation theories, immediate questions that trigger the processing of the global understanding of the event can heighten false memory rates. However, questions that trigger the processing of specific details can inoculate memories against subsequent misinformation...
September 2016: Applied Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27915365/now-you-make-false-memories-now-you-do-not-the-order-of-presentation-of-words-in-drm-lists-influences-the-production-of-the-critical-lure-in-alzheimer-s-disease
#8
Christelle Evrard, Anne-Laure Gilet, Fabienne Colombel, Elodie Dufermont, Yves Corson
Why do some Alzheimer's patients produce fewer false memories than healthy older participants in the Deese-Roediger-McDermott paradigm, which was especially designed for the study of false memories in a laboratory setting? Using a very simple methodology, this study examines a new explanatory factor inherent in the paradigm itself: the order of presentation of the words in the lists. A sample comprising 149 participants (36 younger, 40 middle-aged, 37 healthy older adults, and 36 Alzheimer's patients) performed a DRM task with either a classic descending forward associative strength (FAS) presentation order of the words or an ascending FAS presentation order...
December 3, 2016: Psychological Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27915105/the-effects-of-sleep-restriction-and-sleep-deprivation-in-producing-false-memories
#9
Alex Chatburn, Mark J Kohler, Jessica D Payne, Sean P A Drummond
False memory has been claimed to be the result of an associative process of generalisation, as well as to be representative of memory errors. These can occur at any stage of memory encoding, consolidation, or retrieval, albeit through varied mechanisms. The aim of this paper is to experimentally determine: i) if cognitive dysfunction brought about by sleep loss at the time of stimulus encoding can influence false memory production; and ii) whether this relationship holds across sensory modalities. Subjects undertook both the Deese-Roedigger-McDermott (DRM) false memory task and a visual task designed to produce false memories...
November 30, 2016: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27907808/models-that-allow-us-to-perceive-the-world-more-accurately-also-allow-us-to-remember-past-events-more-accurately-via-differentiation
#10
Aslı Kılıç, Amy H Criss, Kenneth J Malmberg, Richard M Shiffrin
Differentiation is a theory that originally emerged from the perception literature and proposes that with experience, the representation of stimuli becomes more distinct from or less similar to the representation of other stimuli. In recent years, the role of differentiation has played a critical role in models of memory. Differentiation mechanisms have been implemented in episodic memory models by assuming that information about new experiences with a stimulus in a particular context accumulates in a single memory trace and these updated memory traces become more distinct from the representations of other stimuli...
November 28, 2016: Cognitive Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27903704/semantic-congruence-accelerates-the-onset-of-the-neural-signals-of-successful-memory-encoding
#11
P A Packard, A Rodríguez-Fornells, N Bunzeck, B Nicolás, R de Diego-Balaguer, L Fuentemilla
: As the stream of experience unfolds, our memory system rapidly transforms current inputs into long-lasting meaningful memories. A putative neural mechanism that strongly influences how input elements are transformed into meaningful memory codes relies on the ability to integrate them with existing structures of knowledge or schemas. However, it is not yet clear whether schema-related integration neural mechanisms occur during online encoding. In the current investigation, we examined the encoding-dependent nature of this phenomenon in humans...
November 30, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27903437/the-impact-of-sleep-on-true-and-false-memory-across-long-delays
#12
Enmanuelle Pardilla-Delgado, Jessica D Payne
While the influence of sleep on memory has a long history, sleep's role in the formation of false memories is less clear. Moreover, virtually nothing is known about the development of false memories beyond delays of about 12 hours. Here, for the first time, we assess post-sleep development of true and false memories across longer delay intervals of 24 and 48 hours. Although technically a false memory, remembering information that is related to the theme, or gist, of an experience can be considered an adaptive process...
November 26, 2016: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27899170/confabulation-developing-the-emotion-dysregulation-hypothesis
#13
REVIEW
Oliver H Turnbull, Christian E Salas
Confabulations offer unique opportunities for establishing the neurobiological basis of delusional thinking. As regards causal factors, a review of the confabulation literature suggests that neither amnesia nor executive impairment can be the sole (or perhaps even the primary) cause of all delusional beliefs - though they may act in concert with other factors. A key perspective in the modern literature is that many delusions have an emotionally positive or 'wishful' element, that may serve to modulate or manage emotional experience...
October 19, 2016: Cortex; a Journal Devoted to the Study of the Nervous System and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27893013/proton-chemical-shift-imaging-of-the-brain-in-pediatric-and-adult-developmental-stuttering
#14
Joseph O'Neill, Zhengchao Dong, Ravi Bansal, Iliyan Ivanov, Xuejun Hao, Jay Desai, Elena Pozzi, Bradley S Peterson
Importance: Developmental stuttering is a neuropsychiatric condition of incompletely understood brain origin. Our recent functional magnetic resonance imaging study indicates a possible partial basis of stuttering in circuits enacting self-regulation of motor activity, attention, and emotion. Objective: To further characterize the neurophysiology of stuttering through in vivo assay of neurometabolites in suspect brain regions. Design, Setting, and Participants: Proton chemical shift imaging of the brain was performed in a case-control study of children and adults with and without stuttering...
November 23, 2016: JAMA Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27892833/a-mega-analysis-of-memory-reports-from-eight-peer-reviewed-false-memory-implantation-studies
#15
Alan Scoboria, Kimberley A Wade, D Stephen Lindsay, Tanjeem Azad, Deryn Strange, James Ost, Ira E Hyman
Understanding that suggestive practices can promote false beliefs and false memories for childhood events is important in many settings (e.g., psychotherapeutic, medical, and legal). The generalisability of findings from memory implantation studies has been questioned due to variability in estimates across studies. Such variability is partly due to false memories having been operationalised differently across studies and to differences in memory induction techniques. We explored ways of defining false memory based on memory science and developed a reliable coding system that we applied to reports from eight published implantation studies (N = 423)...
November 28, 2016: Memory
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27889770/usefulness-of-discriminability-and-response-bias-indices-for-the-evaluation-of-recognition-memory-in-mild-cognitive-impairment-and-alzheimer-disease
#16
María Julieta Russo, Gabriela Cohen, Jorge Campos, Maria Eugenia Martin, María Florencia Clarens, Liliana Sabe, Ernesto Barcelo, Ricardo F Allegri
BACKGROUND: Most studies examining episodic memory in Alzheimer disease (AD) have focused on patients' impaired ability to remember information. This approach provides only a partial picture of memory deficits since other factors involved are not considered. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the recognition memory performance by using a yes/no procedure to examine the effect of discriminability and response bias measures in amnestic mild cognitive impairment (a-MCI), AD dementia, and normal-aging subjects...
November 26, 2016: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885897/false-feedback-and-beliefs-influence-name-recall-in-younger-and-older-adults
#17
Carla M Strickland-Hughes, Robin Lea West, Kimberly A Smith, Natalie C Ebner
Feedback is an important self-regulatory process that affects task effort and subsequent performance. Benefits of positive feedback for list recall have been explored in research on goals and feedback, but the effect of negative feedback on memory has rarely been studied. The current research extends knowledge of memory and feedback effects by investigating face-name association memory and by examining the potential mediation of feedback effects, in younger and older adults, through self-evaluative beliefs...
November 25, 2016: Memory
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27884106/spectre-a-spectral-coherence-based-classifier-of-actively-translated-transcripts-from-ribosome-profiling-sequence-data
#18
Sang Y Chun, Caitlin M Rodriguez, Peter K Todd, Ryan E Mills
BACKGROUND: Active protein translation can be assessed and measured using ribosome profiling sequencing strategies. Prevailing analytical approaches applied to this technology make use of sequence fragment length profiling or reading frame occupancy enrichment to differentiate between active translation and background noise, however they do not consider additional characteristics inherent to the technology which limits their overall accuracy. RESULTS: Here, we present an analytical tool that models the overall tri-nucleotide periodicity of ribosomal occupancy using a classifier based on spectral coherence...
November 25, 2016: BMC Bioinformatics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27859884/repetition-reveals-ups-and-downs-of-hippocampal-thalamic-and-neocortical-engagement-during-mnemonic-decisions
#19
Zachariah M Reagh, Elizabeth A Murray, Michael A Yassa
The extent to which current information is consistent with past experiences and our capacity to recognize or discriminate accordingly are key factors in flexible memory-guided behavior. Despite a wealth of evidence linking hippocampal and neocortical computations to these phenomena, many important factors remain poorly understood. One such factor is repeated encoding of learned information. In this experiment, participants completed a task in which study stimuli were incidentally encoded either once or three separate times during high-resolution fMRI scanning...
November 16, 2016: Hippocampus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27844295/semantic-priming-not-repetition-priming-is-to-blame-for-false-hearing
#20
Chad S Rogers
Contextual and sensory information are combined in speech perception. Conflict between the two can lead to false hearing, defined as a high-confidence misidentification of a spoken word. Rogers, Jacoby, and Sommers (Psychology and Aging, 27(1), 33-45, 2012) found that older adults are more susceptible to false hearing than are young adults, using a combination of semantic priming and repetition priming to create context. In this study, the type of context (repetition vs. sematic priming) responsible for false hearing was examined...
November 14, 2016: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
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