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Drosophila immunity

Juan A Mondotte, Maria-Carla Saleh
The use of Drosophila as a model organism has made an important contribution to our understanding of the function and regulation of innate immunity in insects. Indeed, insects can discriminate between different types of pathogens and mount specific and effective responses. Strikingly, the same pathogen can trigger a different immune response in the same organism, depending solely on the route of infection by which the pathogen is delivered. In this review, we recapitulate what is known about antiviral responses in Drosophila, and how they are triggered depending on the route and the mode used for the virus to infect its host...
2018: Advances in Virus Research
Yongjie Liu, Fujun Hou, Zhaoying Qian, Xiaolin Liu
The clade B serpins contain predominantly intracellular proteins and were reported to be involved in multiple biological functions, especially in inflammation and immune system function. However, studies about the role of the invertebrate intracellular serpins in immune responses were still deficient. Therefore, this paper focused on the functional characterization of LvserpinB3 in white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei. The pAc5.1-LvserpinB3-EGFP vector was transfected into Drosophila Schneider 2 (S2) cells to analyze the subcellular localization of LvserpinB3, and fluorescent imaging showed that LvserpinB3 were mainly localized to the mitochondria...
March 14, 2018: Developmental and Comparative Immunology
Jing-Rong Kong, Wei Wei, Xue-Li Qiao, Huan Kang, Di Huang, Yuan Liu, Wei-Na Wang
It is well known that PI3K regulates various processes in mammalian cells by generating a secondary messenger that later activates AKT. However, its innate immune function in crustaceans remains unclear. We report the characterization of Litopenaeus vannamei PI3K (LvPI3K) for investigating how PI3K participates in the innate immunity of crustaceans. Full-length LvPI3K cDNA was 3357 bp long, with a 3222 bp open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a putative protein of 1292 amino acids. The PI3K catalytic domain (PI3Kc) of LvPI3K was found to be rather conserved when the PI3Ks from other species were analyzed...
March 12, 2018: Fish & Shellfish Immunology
Ambra Masuzzo, Julien Royet
Immune responses and metabolic regulation are tightly coupled in animals, but the underlying mechanistic connections are not fully understood. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Lee et al. (2018) reveal how sustained ROS production in the gut depends on an upstream metabolic switch.
March 14, 2018: Cell Host & Microbe
Ilias Kounatidis, Lauren Ames, Rupal Mistry, Hsueh-Lui Ho, Ken Haynes, Petros Ligoxygakis
Candida glabrata ( C. glabrata ) forms part of the normal human gut microbiota but can cause life-threatening invasive infections in immune-compromised individuals. C. glabrata displays high resistance to common azole antifungals, which necessitates new treatments. In this investigation, we identified five C. glabrata deletion mutants ( Δada2 , Δbas1 , Δhir3, Δino2 and Δmet31 ) from a library of 196 transcription factor mutants that were unable to grow and activate an immune response in Drosophila larvae...
March 13, 2018: G3: Genes—Genomes—Genetics
Marike Rüder, Benedikt M Nagel, Sven Bogdan
The most abundant immune cells in Drosophila are macrophage-like plasmatocytes that fulfill central roles in morphogenesis, immune and tissue damage response. The various genetic tools available in Drosophila together with high-resolution and live-imaging microscopy techniques make Drosophila macrophages an excellent model system that combines many advantages of cultured cells with in vivo genetics. Here, we describe the isolation and staining of macrophages from larvae for ex vivo structured illumination microscopy (SIM), the preparation of white prepupae for in vivo 2D random cell migration analysis, and the preparation of pupae (18 h after puparium formation, APF) for in vivo 3D directed cell migration analysis upon wounding using spinning disk microscopy...
2018: Methods in Molecular Biology
Samantha Haller, Adrien Franchet, Abdul Hakkim, Jing Chen, Eliana Drenkard, Shen Yu, Stefanie Schirmeier, Zi Li, Nelson Martins, Frederick M Ausubel, Samuel Liégeois, Dominique Ferrandon
When Drosophila melanogaster feeds on Pseudomonas aeruginosa , some bacteria cross the intestinal barrier and eventually proliferate in the hemocoel. This process is limited by hemocytes through phagocytosis. P. aeruginosa requires the quorum-sensing regulator RhlR to elude the cellular immune response of the fly. RhlI synthesizes the autoinducer signal that activates RhlR. Here, we show that rhlI mutants are unexpectedly more virulent than rhlR mutants, both in fly and in nematode intestinal infection models, suggesting that RhlR has RhlI-independent functions...
March 9, 2018: EMBO Reports
William H Palmer, Finny S Varghese, Ronald P van Rij
The power and ease of Drosophila genetics and the medical relevance of mosquito-transmitted viruses have made dipterans important model organisms in antiviral immunology. Studies of virus-host interactions at the molecular and population levels have illuminated determinants of resistance to virus infection. Here, we review the sources and nature of variation in antiviral immunity and virus susceptibility in model dipteran insects, specifically the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and vector mosquitoes of the genera Aedes and Culex ...
March 9, 2018: Viruses
L T Sigle, J F Hillyer
Haemocytes respond to infection by phagocytosing pathogens, producing the enzymes that drive the phenoloxidase-based melanization cascade, secreting lytic factors, and producing other humoral proteins. A subset of haemocytes, called periostial haemocytes, aggregate on the surface of the heart of mosquitoes and kill pathogens in areas of high haemolymph flow. Periostial haemocytes are always present, but an infection induces the recruitment of additional haemocytes to these regions. Here, we tested whether members of the Nimrod gene family are involved in the periostial immune response of the African malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae...
March 9, 2018: Insect Molecular Biology
Kyung-Joo Seong, Hyeong-Jun Kim, Bangrong Cai, Min-Suk Kook, Ji-Yeon Jung, Won-Jae Kim
The subgranular zone (SGZ) of hippocampal dentate gyrus (HDG) is a primary site of adult neurogenesis. Toll-like receptors (TLRs), are involved in neural system development of Drosophila and innate immune response of mammals. TLR2 is expressed abundantly in neurogenic niches such as adult mammalian hippocampus. It regulates adult hippocampal neurogenesis. However, the role of TLR2 in adult neurogenesis is not well studied in global or focal cerebral ischemia. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the role of TLR2 in adult neurogenesis after photochemically induced cerebral ischemia...
March 2018: Korean Journal of Physiology & Pharmacology
Eek-Hoon Jho
Since the first component of Hippo signaling, Wts in Drosophila, was identified in 1995, the progress of Hippo signaling studies has been very slow initially. However, after the findings suggesting that the core kinase pathway established in Drosophila was evolutionarily conserved in metazoans for the determination of organ size around 2008, the number of publications related to Hippo signaling has grown exponentially. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying Hippo signaling response to intrinsic cues, such as cell-cell contact and mechanotransduction, as well as extrinsic cues, such as nutrients and soluble factors, has been one of the key topics of Hippo signaling...
March 9, 2018: BMB Reports
Yu Liu, Peng Zhang, Weilin Wang, Miren Dong, Min Wang, Changhao Gong, Zhihao Jia, Zhaoqun Liu, Anguo Zhang, Lingling Wang, Linsheng Song
DM9 is a novel protein domain with unknown function originally discovered in Drosophila melanogaster. Recently, a protein harboring DM9 repeats was identified as mannose-specific lectin (CgCGL1, renamed as CgDM9CP-1) from the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. In the present study, another DM9 containing protein was identified from oyster C. gigas (designated as CgDM9CP-2). The open reading frame of CgDM9CP-2 gene was of 432 bp, encoding a polypeptide of 143 amino acids with two tandem DM9 repeats. The deduced amino acid sequence of CgDM9CP-2 shared 60...
March 5, 2018: Developmental and Comparative Immunology
Stephen W Roth, Moshe D Bitterman, Morris J Birnbaum, Michelle L Bland
In obese adipose tissue, Toll-like receptor signaling in macrophages leads to insulin resistance in adipocytes. Similarly, Toll signaling in the Drosophila larval fat body blocks insulin-dependent growth and nutrient storage. We find that Toll acts cell autonomously to block growth but not PI(3,4,5)P3 production in fat body cells expressing constitutively active PI3K. Fat body Toll signaling blocks whole-animal growth in rictor mutants lacking TORC2 activity, but not in larvae lacking Pdk1. Phosphorylation of Akt on the Pdk1 site, Thr342, is significantly reduced by Toll signaling, and expression of mutant AktT342D rescues cell and animal growth, nutrient storage, and viability in animals with active Toll signaling...
March 6, 2018: Cell Reports
Santiago Nahuel Villegas, Rita Gombos, Lucia García-López, Irene Gutiérrez-Pérez, Jesús García-Castillo, Diana Marcela Vallejo, Vanina Gabriela Da Ros, Esther Ballesta-Illán, József Mihály, Maria Dominguez
The PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, Notch, and other oncogenes cooperate in the induction of aggressive cancers. Elucidating how the PI3K/Akt pathway facilitates tumorigenesis by other oncogenes may offer opportunities to develop drugs with fewer side effects than those currently available. Here, using an unbiased in vivo chemical genetic screen in Drosophila, we identified compounds that inhibit the activity of proinflammatory enzymes nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and lipoxygenase (LOX) as selective suppressors of Notch-PI3K/Akt cooperative oncogenesis...
March 6, 2018: Cell Reports
Alexey Moskalev, Mikhail Shaposhnikov, Nadezhda Zemskaya, Alexey Belyi, Eugenia Dobrovolskaya, Anna Patova, Zulfiya Guvatova, Elena Lukyanova, Anastasiya Snezhkina, Anna Kudryavtseva
BACKGROUND: We have previously showed that the carotenoid fucoxanthin can increase the lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. However, the molecular mechanisms of the geroprotective effect of fucoxanthin have not been studied so far. RESULTS: Here, we studied the effects of fucoxanthin on the Drosophila aging process at the molecular and the whole organism levels. At the organismal level, fucoxanthin increased the median lifespan and had a positive effect on fecundity, fertility, intestinal barrier function, and nighttime sleep...
February 9, 2018: BMC Genomics
Enzo Z Poirier, Bertsy Goic, Lorena Tomé-Poderti, Lionel Frangeul, Jérémy Boussier, Valérie Gausson, Hervé Blanc, Thomas Vallet, Hyelee Loyd, Laura I Levi, Sophie Lanciano, Chloé Baron, Sarah H Merkling, Louis Lambrechts, Marie Mirouze, Susan Carpenter, Marco Vignuzzi, Maria-Carla Saleh
The RNAi pathway confers antiviral immunity in insects. Virus-specific siRNA responses are amplified via the reverse transcription of viral RNA to viral DNA (vDNA). The nature, biogenesis, and regulation of vDNA are unclear. We find that vDNA produced during RNA virus infection of Drosophila and mosquitoes is present in both linear and circular forms. Circular vDNA (cvDNA) is sufficient to produce siRNAs that confer partially protective immunity when challenged with a cognate virus. cvDNAs bear homology to defective viral genomes (DVGs), and DVGs serve as templates for vDNA and cvDNA synthesis...
February 27, 2018: Cell Host & Microbe
Kyung-Ah Lee, Kyu-Chan Cho, Boram Kim, In-Hwan Jang, Kibum Nam, Young Eun Kwon, Myungjin Kim, Do Young Hyeon, Daehee Hwang, Jae-Hong Seol, Won-Jae Lee
DUOX, a member of the NADPH oxidase family, acts as the first line of defense against enteric pathogens by producing microbicidal reactive oxygen species. DUOX is activated upon enteric infection, but the mechanisms regulating DUOX activity remain incompletely understood. Using Drosophila genetic tools, we show that enteric infection results in "pro-catabolic" signaling that initiates metabolic reprogramming of enterocytes toward lipid catabolism, which ultimately governs DUOX homeostasis. Infection induces signaling cascades involving TRAF3 and kinases AMPK and WTS, which regulate TOR kinase to control the balance of lipogenesis versus lipolysis...
February 8, 2018: Cell Host & Microbe
Bo G Lindberg, Xiongzhuo Tang, Widad Dantoft, Priya Gohel, Shiva Seyedoleslami Esfahani, Jessica M Lindvall, Ylva Engström
Gut immunity is regulated by intricate and dynamic mechanisms to ensure homeostasis despite a constantly changing microbial environment. Several regulatory factors have been described to participate in feedback responses to prevent aberrant immune activity. Little is, however, known about how transcriptional programs are directly tuned to efficiently adapt host gut tissues to the current microbiome. Here we show that the POU/Oct gene nubbin (nub) encodes two transcription factor isoforms, Nub-PB and Nub-PD, which antagonistically regulate immune gene expression in Drosophila...
March 2, 2018: PLoS Pathogens
Amy J Osborne, Peter K Dearden
The Developmental Origins of Health and Disease hypothesis predicts that early-life environmental exposures can be detrimental to later-life health and that mismatch between the pre- and post-natal environment may contribute to the growing non-communicable disease epidemic. Within this is an increasingly recognized role for epigenetic mechanisms; for example, epigenetic modifications can be influenced by nutrition and can alter gene expression in mothers and offspring. Currently, there are few whole-genome transcriptional studies of response to nutritional alteration...
October 2017: Environmental Epigenetics
Kathrin Garschall, Thomas Flatt
Here, we provide a brief review of the mechanistic connections between immunity and aging-a fundamental biological relationship that remains poorly understood-by considering two intertwined questions: how does aging affect immunity, and how does immunity affect aging? On the one hand, aging contributes to the deterioration of immune function and predisposes the organism to infections ("immuno-senescence"). On the other hand, excessive activation of the immune system can accelerate degenerative processes, cause inflammation and immunopathology, and thus promote aging ("inflammaging")...
2018: F1000Research
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