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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28743793/animal-models-of-men-1
#1
Hermine Mohr, Natalia S Pellegata
Animal models of cancer have been instrumental in advancing our understanding of the biology of tumor initiation and progression, in studying gene function, and in performing preclinical studies aimed at testing novel therapies. Several animal models of the MEN1 syndrome have been generated in different organisms by introducing loss-of-function mutations in the orthologues of the human MEN1 gene. In this review, we will discuss MEN1 and MEN1-like models in Drosophila, mice and rats. These model systems with their specific advantages and limitations have contributed to elucidate the function of Menin in tumorigenesis, which turned out to be remarkably conserved from flies to mammals, as well as the biology of the disease...
July 25, 2017: Endocrine-related Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28718438/tissue-intrinsic-tumor-hotspots-terroir-for-tumorigenesis
#2
REVIEW
Yoichiro Tamori, Wu-Min Deng
Epithelial tissues are highly organized systems with a remarkable homeostatic ability to maintain morphology through regulation of cellular proliferation and tissue integrity. This robust self-organizing system is progressively disrupted during tumor development. Recent studies of conserved tumor-suppressor genes in Drosophila showed how protumor cells deviate from the robustly organized tissue microenvironment to take the first steps into becoming aggressive tumors. Here we review the 'tumor hotspot' hypothesis that explains how the tissue-intrinsic local microenvironment has a pivotal role in the initial stage of tumorigenesis in Drosophila epithelia and discuss comparable mechanisms in mammalian tissues...
April 2017: Trends in Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28712876/drosophila-sce-dring-e3-ligase-inhibits-apoptosis-in-a-dp53-dependent-manner
#3
Rocío Simón, Carolina J Simoes da Silva, Sol Fereres, Ana Busturia
The Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins control developmental gene silencing and are highly conserved between flies and mammals. PcG proteins function by controlling post-translational modification of histones, such as ubiquitylation, which impacts chromatin compaction and thus gene transcription. Changes in PcG cellular levels have drastic effects on organismal development and are involved in the generation of human pathologies such as cancer. However, the mechanisms controlling their levels of expression and their physiological effects are only partially understood...
July 13, 2017: Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28708826/intestinal-stem-cell-overproliferation-resulting-from-inactivation-of-the-apc-tumor-suppressor-requires-the-transcription-cofactors-earthbound-and-erect-wing
#4
Ai Tian, Hassina Benchabane, Zhenghan Wang, Chloe Zimmerman, Nan Xin, Jessica Perochon, Gabriela Kalna, Owen J Sansom, Chao Cheng, Julia B Cordero, Yashi Ahmed
Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction directs intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation during homeostasis. Hyperactivation of Wnt signaling initiates colorectal cancer, which most frequently results from truncation of the tumor suppressor Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). The β-catenin-TCF transcription complex activates both the physiological expression of Wnt target genes in the normal intestinal epithelium and their aberrantly increased expression in colorectal tumors. Whether mechanistic differences in the Wnt transcription machinery drive these distinct levels of target gene activation in physiological versus pathological states remains uncertain, but is relevant for the design of new therapeutic strategies...
July 2017: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28658615/pp6-disruption-synergizes-with-oncogenic-ras-to-promote-jnk-dependent-tumor-growth-and-invasion
#5
Xianjue Ma, Jin-Yu Lu, Yongli Dong, Daming Li, Juan N Malagon, Tian Xu
RAS genes are frequently mutated in cancers, yet an effective treatment has not been developed, partly because of an incomplete understanding of signaling within Ras-related tumors. To address this, we performed a genetic screen in Drosophila, aiming to find mutations that cooperate with oncogenic Ras (Ras(V12)) to induce tumor overgrowth and invasion. We identified fiery mountain (fmt), a regulatory subunit of the protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) complex, as a tumor suppressor that synergizes with Ras(V12) to drive c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent tumor growth and invasiveness...
June 27, 2017: Cell Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28648883/molecular-cloning-and-functional-analysis-of-tumor-necrosis-factor-receptor-associated-factor-6-traf6-in-crossastrea-gigas
#6
Fan Mao, Jun Li, Yuehuan Zhang, Zhiming Xiang, Yang Zhang, Ziniu Yu
Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) has been demonstrated to be a key signaling molecule involved in adaptive and innate immunity. In this study, we obtained the full length CgTRAF6 cDNA and analyzed the characteristics of the ORF and the peptide sequence in Crassostrea gigas. The deduced protein sequence of CgTRAF6 includes a conserved C-terminal TRAF domain following the RING and the zinc finger domain. The TRAF domain is composed of coiled-coil TRAF-N and MATH (meprin and TRAF-C homology) subdomains...
June 23, 2017: Fish & Shellfish Immunology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28620760/notch-an-interactive-player-in-neurogenesis-and-disease
#7
REVIEW
Runrui Zhang, Anna Engler, Verdon Taylor
Notch signaling is evolutionarily conserved from Drosophila to human. It plays critical roles in neural stem cell maintenance and neurogenesis in the embryonic brain as well as in the adult brain. Notch functions greatly depend on careful regulation and cross-talk with other regulatory mechanisms. Deregulation of Notch signaling is involved in many neurodegenerative diseases and brain disorders. Here, we summarize the fundamental role of Notch in neuronal development and specification and discuss how epigenetic regulation and pathway cross-talk contribute to Notch function...
June 15, 2017: Cell and Tissue Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28620086/a-genetic-screen-reveals-an-unexpected-role-for-yorkie-signaling-in-jak-stat-dependent-hematopoietic-malignancies-in-drosophila-melanogaster
#8
Abigail M Anderson, Alessandro A Bailetti, Elizabeth Rodkin, Atish De, Erika A Bach
A gain-of-function mutation in the tyrosine kinase JAK2 (JAK2(V617F) ) causes human myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). These patients present with high numbers of myeloid lineage cells and have numerous complications. Since current MPN therapies are not curative, there is a need to find new regulators and targets of JAK/STAT signaling that may represent additional clinical interventions. Drosophila melanogaster offers a low complexity model to study MPNs as JAK/STAT signaling is simplified with only one JAK (Hopscotch (Hop)) and one STAT (Stat92E)...
June 15, 2017: G3: Genes—Genomes—Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28619822/cop9-signalosome-subunits-protect-capicua-from-map-kinase-dependent-and-independent-mechanisms-of-degradation
#9
Annabelle Suisse, DanQing He, Kevin Legent, Jessica E Treisman
The COP9 signalosome removes Nedd8 modifications from the Cullin subunits of ubiquitin ligase complexes, reducing their activity. Here we show that mutations in the Drosophila COP9 signalosome subunit 1b (CSN1b) gene increase the activity of ubiquitin ligases that contain Cullin 1. Analysis of CSN1b mutant phenotypes revealed a requirement for the COP9 signalosome to prevent ectopic expression of Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) target genes. It does so by protecting Capicua, a transcriptional repressor of EGFR target genes, from EGFR pathway-dependent ubiquitination by a Cullin 1/SKP1-related A/Archipelago E3 ligase and subsequent proteasomal degradation...
June 15, 2017: Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28619817/canoe-and-scribble-loss-synergizes-causing-tumor-like-overgrowth-via-ras-activation-in-neural-stem-cells-and-epithelia
#10
Noemí Rives-Quinto, Maribel Franco, Ana de Torres-Jurado, Ana Carmena
Over the past decade an intriguing connection between asymmetric cell division, stem cells and tumorigenesis has emerged. Neuroblasts, the neural stem cells of the Drosophila central nervous system, divide asymmetrically and constitute an excellent paradigm for further investigating that connection. Here we show that the simultaneous loss of the asymmetric cell division regulators Canoe (Afadin in mammals) and Scribble in neuroblast clones leads to tumor-like overgrowth through both a severe disruption of the asymmetric cell division process and a canoe loss-mediated Ras-PI3K-Akt activation...
June 15, 2017: Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28600967/mechanisms-of-cell-competition-emerging-from-drosophila-studies
#11
Nicholas E Baker
Cell competition was described in Drosophila as the loss from mosaic tissues of otherwise viable cells heterozygous for Ribosomal protein mutations ('Minutes'). Cell competition has now been described to occur between multiple other genotypes, such as cells differing in myc expression levels, or mutated for neoplastic tumor suppressors. Recent studies implicate innate immunity components, and possibly mechanical stress, compression and cell intercalation as a consequence of differential growth rates in competitive cell death...
June 7, 2017: Current Opinion in Cell Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28583847/timeless-confers-cisplatin-resistance-in-nasopharyngeal-carcinoma-by-activating-the-wnt-%C3%AE-catenin-signaling-pathway-and-promoting-the-epithelial-mesenchymal-transition
#12
Sai-Lan Liu, Huan-Xin Lin, Chu-Yong Lin, Xiao-Qing Sun, Li-Ping Ye, Fang Qiu, Wen Wen, Xin Hua, Xian-Qiu Wu, Jun Li, Li-Bing Song, Ling Guo
This study investigated the expression, clinicopathological significance and mechanism of action of TIMELESS, a mammalian homolog of a Drosophila circadian rhythm gene, in nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Quantitative real-time PCR, western blotting and immunohistochemistry revealed TIMELESS was upregulated in NPC cell lines (n = 8 vs. NP69 cells), and freshly-frozen (n = 6) and paraffin-embedded human NPC specimens (n = 108 vs. normal samples/non-tumor cells). TIMELESS expression was associated with T category (P = 0...
June 3, 2017: Cancer Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28574763/the-dark-side-of-hippo-signaling-a-cancer-promoter-role
#13
Brandon Dunn, Xianjue Ma
The Hippo signaling pathway regulates organ size and tissue homeostasis. Given this role it is unsurprising that dysregulation of this pathway has implications for cancer progression. A convincing body of literature shows that the Hippo pathway serves a tumor suppressive function with its inactivation leading to massive overgrowth. However, additional studies have also shown that activation of Hippo signaling can promote tumor progression. It remains unknown how a single pathway can produce such diametrically opposed effects...
June 2, 2017: Fly
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28571774/modulatory-effects-of-metformin-on-mutagenicity-and-epithelial-tumor-incidence-in-doxorubicin-treated-drosophila-melanogaster
#14
Victor Constante Oliveira, Sarah Alves Rodrigues Constante, Priscila Capelari Orsolin, Júlio César Nepomuceno, Alexandre Azenha Alves de Rezende, Mário Antônio Spanó
Metformin (MET) is an anti-diabetic drug used to prevent hepatic glucose release and increase tissue insulin sensitivity. Diabetic cancer patients are on additional therapy with anticancer drugs. Doxorubicin (DXR) is a cancer chemotherapeutic agent that interferes with the topoisomerase II enzyme and generates free radicals. MET (2.5, 5, 10, 25 or 50 mM) alone was examined for mutagenicity, recombinogenicity and carcinogenicity, and combined with DXR (0.4 mM) for antimutagenicity, antirecombinogenicity and anticarcinogenicity, using the Somatic Mutation and Recombination Test and the Test for Detecting Epithelial Tumor Clones in Drosophila melanogaster...
May 29, 2017: Food and Chemical Toxicology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28566755/merlin-is-required-for-coordinating-proliferation-of-two-stem-cell-lineages-in-the-drosophila-testis
#15
Mayu Inaba, Dorothy R Sorenson, Matt Kortus, Viktoria Salzmann, Yukiko M Yamashita
Although the mechanisms that balance self-renewal and differentiation of a stem cell lineage have been extensively studied, it remains poorly understood how tissues that contain multiple stem cell lineages maintain balanced proliferation among distinct lineages: when stem cells of a particular lineage proliferate, how do the other lineages respond to maintain the correct ratio of cells among linages? Here, we show that Merlin (Mer), a homolog of the human tumor suppressor neurofibromatosis 2, is required to coordinate proliferation of germline stem cells (GSCs) and somatic cyst stem cells (CySCs) in the Drosophila testis...
May 31, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28552546/use-of-the-crispr-cas9-system-for-genome-editing-in-cultured-drosophila-ovarian-somatic-cells
#16
Hirotsugu Ishizu, Tetsutaro Sumiyoshi, Mikiko C Siomi
The CRISPR-Cas9 system can be used for genome engineering in many organisms. PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) play a crucial role in repressing transposons to maintain genome integrity in Drosophila ovaries, and cultured ovarian somatic cells (OSCs) are widely used to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the piRNA pathway. However, the germline-specific piRNA amplification system known as the ping-pong machinery does not occur in OSCs, making them unsuitable for elucidating the underlying mechanisms...
May 25, 2017: Methods: a Companion to Methods in Enzymology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28522430/the-drosophila-lin54-homolog-mip120-controls-two-aspects-of-oogenesis
#17
Mei-Hsin Cheng, Laura Andrejka, Paul J Vorster, Albert Hinman, Joseph S Lipsick
The conserved multi-protein MuvB core associates with the Myb oncoproteins and with the RB-E2F-DP tumor suppressor proteins in complexes that regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Drosophila Mip120, a homolog of LIN54, is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein within the MuvB core. A mutant of Drosophilamip120 was previously shown to cause female and male sterility. We now show that Mip120 regulates two different aspects of oogenesis. First, in the absence of the Mip120 protein, egg chambers arrest during the transition from stage 7 to 8 with a failure of the normal program of chromosomal dynamics in the ovarian nurse cells...
July 15, 2017: Biology Open
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28520736/the-bantam-microrna-acts-through-numb-to-exert-cell-growth-control-and-feedback-regulation-of-notch-in-tumor-forming-stem-cells-in-the-drosophila-brain
#18
Yen-Chi Wu, Kyu-Sun Lee, Yan Song, Stephan Gehrke, Bingwei Lu
Notch (N) signaling is central to the self-renewal of neural stem cells (NSCs) and other tissue stem cells. Its deregulation compromises tissue homeostasis and contributes to tumorigenesis and other diseases. How N regulates stem cell behavior in health and disease is not well understood. Here we show that N regulates bantam (ban) microRNA to impact cell growth, a process key to NSC maintenance and particularly relied upon by tumor-forming cancer stem cells. Notch signaling directly regulates ban expression at the transcriptional level, and ban in turn feedback regulates N activity through negative regulation of the Notch inhibitor Numb...
May 2017: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28512144/tog-tubulin-binding-specificity-promotes-microtubule-dynamics-and-mitotic-spindle-formation
#19
Amy E Byrnes, Kevin C Slep
XMAP215, CLASP, and Crescerin use arrayed tubulin-binding tumor overexpressed gene (TOG) domains to modulate microtubule dynamics. We hypothesized that TOGs have distinct architectures and tubulin-binding properties that underlie each family's ability to promote microtubule polymerization or pause. As a model, we investigated the pentameric TOG array of a Drosophila melanogaster XMAP215 member, Msps. We found that Msps TOGs have distinct architectures that bind either free or polymerized tubulin, and that a polarized array drives microtubule polymerization...
June 5, 2017: Journal of Cell Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508063/the-long-noncoding-rna-sprightly-acts-as-an-intranuclear-organizing-hub-for-pre-mrna-molecules
#20
Bongyong Lee, Anupama Sahoo, John Marchica, Erwin Holzhauser, Xiaoli Chen, Jian-Liang Li, Tatsuya Seki, Subramaniam Shyamala Govindarajan, Fatu Badiane Markey, Mona Batish, Sonali J Lokhande, Shaojie Zhang, Animesh Ray, Ranjan J Perera
Molecular mechanisms by which long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) molecules may influence cancerous condition are poorly understood. The aberrant expression of SPRIGHTLY lncRNA, encoded within the drosophila gene homolog Sprouty-4 intron, is correlated with a variety of cancers, including human melanomas. We demonstrate by SHAPE-seq and dChIRP that SPRIGHTLY RNA secondary structure has a core pseudoknotted domain. This lncRNA interacts with the intronic regions of six pre-mRNAs: SOX5, SMYD3, SND1, MEOX2, DCTN6, and RASAL2, all of which have cancer-related functions...
May 2017: Science Advances
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