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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28820389/hippo-pathway-brief-overview-of-its-relevance-in-cancer
#1
A L Zygulska, K Krzemieniecki, P Pierzchalski
The Hippo pathway is the major regulator of organ growth and proliferation. Described initially in Drosophila, it is now recognized as one of the most conserved molecular pathways in all metazoan. Recent studies have revealed the Hippo signalling pathway might contribute to tumorigenesis and cancer development. The core components of the Hippo pathway include the mammalian sterile 20-like kinases (MSTs), large tumour suppressor kinases (LATSs), the adaptor proteins Salvador homologue 1 (SAV1, also called WW45) and Mps One Binder kinase activator proteins...
June 2017: Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology: An Official Journal of the Polish Physiological Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812582/control-of-intestinal-stem-cell-function-and-proliferation-by-mitochondrial-pyruvate-metabolism
#2
John C Schell, Dona R Wisidagama, Claire Bensard, Helong Zhao, Peng Wei, Jason Tanner, Aimee Flores, Jeffrey Mohlman, Lise K Sorensen, Christian S Earl, Kristofor A Olson, Ren Miao, T Cameron Waller, Don Delker, Priyanka Kanth, Lei Jiang, Ralph J DeBerardinis, Mary P Bronner, Dean Y Li, James E Cox, Heather R Christofk, William E Lowry, Carl S Thummel, Jared Rutter
Most differentiated cells convert glucose to pyruvate in the cytosol through glycolysis, followed by pyruvate oxidation in the mitochondria. These processes are linked by the mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC), which is required for efficient mitochondrial pyruvate uptake. In contrast, proliferative cells, including many cancer and stem cells, perform glycolysis robustly but limit fractional mitochondrial pyruvate oxidation. We sought to understand the role this transition from glycolysis to pyruvate oxidation plays in stem cell maintenance and differentiation...
August 14, 2017: Nature Cell Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28794168/notch-signaling-in-development-tissue-homeostasis-and-disease
#3
REVIEW
Chris Siebel, Urban Lendahl
Notch signaling is an evolutionarily highly conserved signaling mechanism, but in contrast to signaling pathways such as Wnt, Sonic Hedgehog, and BMP/TGF-β, Notch signaling occurs via cell-cell communication, where transmembrane ligands on one cell activate transmembrane receptors on a juxtaposed cell. Originally discovered through mutations in Drosophila more than 100 yr ago, and with the first Notch gene cloned more than 30 yr ago, we are still gaining new insights into the broad effects of Notch signaling in organisms across the metazoan spectrum and its requirement for normal development of most organs in the body...
October 1, 2017: Physiological Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28757480/research-progresses-on-the-molecular-structure-of-the-hippo-signaling-pathway-components
#4
Hu Liqiao, Zhou Zhaocai, Tian Wei
The Hippo signaling pathway has been identified to be involved in development and tissue homeostasis during the past decade, and is evolutionarily conserved from Drosophila to mammals. It transduces the signal through a series of protein-protein interaction and kinase cascades, to control the cell number and organ size by inhibiting cell proliferation and promoting apoptosis. Dysregulation of the Hippo signaling pathway is associated with tumorigenesis and cancers, so it is a crucial target for cancer therapy and regeneration medicine...
July 20, 2017: Yi Chuan, Hereditas
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28757469/the-discovery-and-expansion-of-hippo-signaling-pathway-in-drosophila-model
#5
Sun Shuguo, Wu Shian, Zhang Lei
The discovery of Hippo signaling pathway is another breakthrough of fly genetics. Similar to the other signaling pathways, Hippo pathway also functions crucially in tremendous physiological and pathological conditions, like organ size control and cancer. There are three main stages of Hippo pathway study: Firstly, identifications of core components by fly genetic screens; secondly, regulations by versatile upstream cues, like cytoskeleton, mechanical tension, and nutrition; thirdly, functions in different biological processes, like cell proliferation regulation, stem cell biology, and immunology...
July 20, 2017: Yi Chuan, Hereditas
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28756009/flaws-in-the-lnt-single-hit-model-for-cancer-risk-an-historical-assessment
#6
REVIEW
Edward J Calabrese
The LNT single-hit model was derived from the Nobel Prize-winning research of Herman J. Muller who showed that x-rays could induce gene mutations in Drosophila and that the dose response for these so-called mutational events was linear. Lewis J. Stadler, another well-known and respected geneticist at the time, strongly disagreed with and challenged Muller's claims. Detailed evaluations by Stadler over a prolonged series of investigations revealed that Muller's experiments had induced gross heritable chromosomal damage instead of specific gene mutations as had been claimed by Muller at his Nobel Lecture...
July 26, 2017: Environmental Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28754838/the-chromatin-remodeling-bap-complex-limits-tumor-promoting-activity-of-the-hippo-pathway-effector-yki-to-prevent-neoplastic-transformation-in-drosophila-epithelia
#7
Shilin Song, Héctor Herranz, Stephen M Cohen
SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complexes are mutated in many human cancers. In this report we make use of a Drosophila genetic model for epithelial tumor formation to explore the tumor suppressive role of SWI/SNF complex proteins. Members of the BAP complex exhibit tumor suppressor activity in tissue overexpressing the Yorkie (Yki) proto-oncogene, but not in tissue overexpressing EGFR. The BAP complex has been reported to serve as a Yki-binding cofactor to support Yki target expression. However, we observed that depletion of BAP leads to ectopic expression of Yki targets both autonomously and non-autonomously, suggesting additional indirect effects...
July 28, 2017: Disease Models & Mechanisms
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28743793/animal-models-of-men-1
#8
Hermine Mohr, Natalia S Pellegata
Animal models of cancer have been instrumental in advancing our understanding of the biology of tumor initiation and progression, in studying gene function, and in performing preclinical studies aimed at testing novel therapies. Several animal models of the MEN1 syndrome have been generated in different organisms by introducing loss-of-function mutations in the orthologues of the human MEN1 gene. In this review, we will discuss MEN1 and MEN1-like models in Drosophila, mice and rats. These model systems with their specific advantages and limitations have contributed to elucidate the function of Menin in tumorigenesis, which turned out to be remarkably conserved from flies to mammals, as well as the biology of the disease...
July 25, 2017: Endocrine-related Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28728902/role-of-mirnas-in-development-and-disease-lessons-learnt-from-small-organisms
#9
REVIEW
Swati Chandra, Divya Vimal, Divya Sharma, Vipin Rai, Subash Chandra Gupta, D Kar Chowdhuri
MicroRNAs (miRNAs) constitute a class of small (21-24 nucleotides) non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster, and many other small organisms have been instrumental in deciphering the biological functions of miRNAs. While some miRNAs from small organisms are highly conserved across the taxa, others are organism specific. The miRNAs are known to play a crucial role during development and in various cellular functions such as cell survival, cell proliferation, and differentiation...
July 17, 2017: Life Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28719866/cell-competition-in-mammals-novel-homeostatic-machinery-for-embryonic-development-and-cancer-prevention
#10
REVIEW
Takeshi Maruyama, Yasuyuki Fujita
In the multi-cellular community, cells with different properties often compete with each other for survival and space. This process is named cell competition and was originally discovered in Drosophila. Recent studies have revealed that comparable phenomena also occur in mammals under various physiological and pathological conditions. Within the epithelium, normal cells often recognize the presence of the neighboring transformed cells and actively eliminate them from the epithelium; a process termed EDAC (Epithelial Defense Against Cancer)...
July 15, 2017: Current Opinion in Cell Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28712876/drosophila-sce-dring-e3-ligase-inhibits-apoptosis-in-a-dp53-dependent-manner
#11
Carolina J Simoes da Silva, Sol Fereres, Rocío Simón, Ana Busturia
The Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins control developmental gene silencing and are highly conserved between flies and mammals. PcG proteins function by controlling post-translational modification of histones, such as ubiquitylation, which impacts chromatin compaction and thus gene transcription. Changes in PcG cellular levels have drastic effects on organismal development and are involved in the generation of human pathologies such as cancer. However, the mechanisms controlling their levels of expression and their physiological effects are only partially understood...
September 1, 2017: Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28708826/intestinal-stem-cell-overproliferation-resulting-from-inactivation-of-the-apc-tumor-suppressor-requires-the-transcription-cofactors-earthbound-and-erect-wing
#12
Ai Tian, Hassina Benchabane, Zhenghan Wang, Chloe Zimmerman, Nan Xin, Jessica Perochon, Gabriela Kalna, Owen J Sansom, Chao Cheng, Julia B Cordero, Yashi Ahmed
Wnt/β-catenin signal transduction directs intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation during homeostasis. Hyperactivation of Wnt signaling initiates colorectal cancer, which most frequently results from truncation of the tumor suppressor Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). The β-catenin-TCF transcription complex activates both the physiological expression of Wnt target genes in the normal intestinal epithelium and their aberrantly increased expression in colorectal tumors. Whether mechanistic differences in the Wnt transcription machinery drive these distinct levels of target gene activation in physiological versus pathological states remains uncertain, but is relevant for the design of new therapeutic strategies...
July 2017: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28701960/role-of-mitochondrial-reverse-electron-transport-in-ros-signaling-potential-roles-in-health-and-disease
#13
REVIEW
Filippo Scialò, Daniel J Fernández-Ayala, Alberto Sanz
Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) can cause oxidative damage and have been proposed to be the main cause of aging and age-related diseases including cancer, diabetes and Parkinson's disease. Accordingly, mitochondria from old individuals have higher levels of ROS. However, ROS also participate in cellular signaling, are instrumental for several physiological processes and boosting ROS levels in model organisms extends lifespan. The current consensus is that low levels of ROS are beneficial, facilitating adaptation to stress via signaling, whereas high levels of ROS are deleterious because they trigger oxidative stress...
2017: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28701701/systematic-discovery-of-genetic-modulation-by-jumonji-histone-demethylases-in-drosophila
#14
Nevine A Shalaby, Raheel Sayed, Qiao Zhang, Shane Scoggin, Susan Eliazer, Adrian Rothenfluh, Michael Buszczak
Jumonji (JmjC) domain proteins influence gene expression and chromatin organization by way of histone demethylation, which provides a means to regulate the activity of genes across the genome. JmjC proteins have been associated with many human diseases including various cancers, developmental and neurological disorders, however, the shared biology and possible common contribution to organismal development and tissue homeostasis of all JmjC proteins remains unclear. Here, we systematically tested the function of all 13 Drosophila JmjC genes...
July 12, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28688927/an-unexpected-friend-ros-in-apoptosis-induced-compensatory-proliferation-implications-for-regeneration-and-cancer
#15
REVIEW
Neha Diwanji, Andreas Bergmann
Apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation (AiP) is a form of compensatory proliferation that is triggered by apoptotic cell death to maintain tissue homeostasis. As such, AiP is essential for many tissue repair processes including regeneration. The apoptotic effectors, termed caspases, not only execute apoptosis, but are also directly involved in the generation of the signals required for AiP. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role for regenerative processes. Recently, it was shown in Drosophila that apoptotic caspases can mediate the generation of ROS for promoting AiP...
July 5, 2017: Seminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28687780/nuclear-receptors-connect-progenitor-transcription-factors-to-cell-cycle-control
#16
Marta Neto, Marina Naval-Sánchez, Delphine Potier, Paulo S Pereira, Dirk Geerts, Stein Aerts, Fernando Casares
The specification and growth of organs is controlled simultaneously by networks of transcription factors. While the connection between these transcription factors with fate determinants is increasingly clear, how they establish the link with the cell cycle is far less understood. Here we investigate this link in the developing Drosophila eye, where two transcription factors, the MEIS1 homologue hth and the Zn-finger tsh, synergize to stimulate the proliferation of naïve eye progenitors. Experiments combining transcriptomics, open-chromatin profiling, motif analysis and functional assays indicate that these progenitor transcription factors exert a global regulation of the proliferation program...
July 7, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28678789/egfr-controls-drosophila-tracheal-tube-elongation-by-intracellular-trafficking-regulation
#17
Ivette Olivares-Castiñeira, Marta Llimargas
Development is governed by a few conserved signalling pathways. Amongst them, the EGFR pathway is used reiteratively for organ and tissue formation, and when dysregulated can lead to cancer and metastasis. Given its relevance, identifying its downstream molecular machinery and understanding how it instructs cellular changes is crucial. Here we approach this issue in the respiratory system of Drosophila. We identify a new role for EGFR restricting the elongation of the tracheal Dorsal Trunk. We find that EGFR regulates the apical determinant Crb and the extracellular matrix regulator Serp, two factors previously known to control tube length...
July 2017: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28673935/functions-of-long-non-coding-rnas-in-human-disease-and-their-conservation-in-drosophila-development
#18
REVIEW
Oliver M Rogoyski, Jose Ignacio Pueyo, Juan Pablo Couso, Sarah F Newbury
Genomic analysis has found that the transcriptome in both humans and Drosophila melanogaster features large numbers of long non-coding RNA transcripts (lncRNAs). This recently discovered class of RNAs regulates gene expression in diverse ways and has been involved in a large variety of important biological functions. Importantly, an increasing number of lncRNAs have also been associated with a range of human diseases, including cancer. Comparative analyses of their functions among these organisms suggest that some of their modes of action appear to be conserved...
August 15, 2017: Biochemical Society Transactions
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28669782/the-drosophila-melanogaster-tribbles-pseudokinase-is-necessary-for-proper-memory-formation
#19
Holly LaFerriere, Troy Zars
The tribbles (trbl) pseudokinases play important roles in signaling and physiology in multiple contexts, ranging from innate immunity to cancer, suggesting fundamental cellular functions for the trbls' gene products. Despite expression of the trbl pseudokinases in the nervous systems of invertebrate and vertebrate animals, and evidence that they have a function within mouse and human dopamine neurons, there is no clear case for a function of a Trbl protein that influences behavior. Indeed, the first and only evidence for this type of function comes from Drosophila melanogaster, where a mutation of the single trbl gene was identified in a genetic screen for short-term memory mutant flies...
June 29, 2017: Neurobiology of Learning and Memory
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28665982/the-sertad-protein-taranis-plays-a-role-in-polycomb-mediated-gene-repression
#20
Pranabananda Dutta, Willis X Li
The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have been implicated in epigenetic transcriptional repression in development, stem cell maintenance and in cancer. The chromodomain protein Polycomb (Pc) is a key member of the PcG. Pc binds to the histone mark, trimethylated histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3), to initiate transcriptional repression. How PcG proteins are recruited to target loci is not fully understood. Here we show that the Drosophila SERTA domain protein Taranis (Tara) is involved in transcriptional regulation of Pc target genes...
2017: PloS One
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