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Human animal studies

Anthony M Cadena, Edwin C Klein, Alexander G White, Jaime A Tomko, Chelsea L Chedrick, Douglas S Reed, Laura E Via, Philana Ling Lin, JoAnne L Flynn
Identifying and refining small-animal models of tuberculosis that recapitulate aspects of human Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection can contribute to advancing our understanding of critical facets of the disease. To study the effects of very low-dose infections with 2 strains of M. tuberculosis on disease progression and survival in common marmosets, animals were challenged with strains Erdman and CDC1551 at doses ranging from 1 to 12 cfu. These data revealed that the susceptibility of marmosets to M. tuberculosis infection is influenced by strain virulence and initial dose...
2016: Comparative Medicine
Jay N Lozier, Mark T Kloos, Elizabeth P Merricks, Nathaly Lemoine, Margaret H Whitford, Robin A Raymer, Dwight A Bellinger, Timothy C Nichols
Animals with hemophilia are models for gene therapy, factor replacement, and inhibitor development in humans. We have actively sought dogs with severe hemophilia A that have novel factor VIII mutations unlike the previously described factor VIII intron 22 inversion. A male Old English Sheepdog with recurrent soft-tissue hemorrhage and hemarthrosis was diagnosed with severe hemophilia A (factor VIII activity less than 1% of normal). We purified genomic DNA from this dog and ruled out the common intron 22 inversion; we then sequenced all 26 exons...
2016: Comparative Medicine
Julia Campbell, John J M Dwyer, Jason B Coe
Promoting dog walking among dog owners is consistent with One Health, which focuses on the mutual health benefits of the human-animal relationship for people and animals. In this study, we used intervention mapping (a framework to develop programs and resources for health promotion) to develop a clearer understanding of the determinants of dog walking to develop curricular and educational resources for promoting regular dog walking among dog owners. Twenty-six adult dog owners in Ontario participated in a semi-structured interview about dog walking in 2014...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Veterinary Medical Education
Rebecca Ruch-Gallie, Heather Weir, Lori R Kogan
Cognitive functioning is often compromised with increasing levels of stress and fatigue, both of which are often experienced by veterinarians. Many high-stress fields have implemented checklists to reduce human error. The use of these checklists has been shown to improve the quality of medical care, including adherence to evidence-based best practices and improvement of patient safety. Although it has been recognized that veterinary medicine would likely demonstrate similar benefits, there have been no published studies to date evaluating the use of checklists for improving quality of care in veterinary medicine...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Veterinary Medical Education
Valentina Gallo, F Nicole Dijk, John W Holloway, Susan M Ring, Gerard H Koppelman, Dirkje S Postma, David P Strachan, Raquel Granell, Johan C de Jongste, Vincent W V Jaddoe, Herman T den Dekker, Liesbeth Duijts, A John Henderson, Seif O Shaheen
BACKGROUND: Animal data have suggested that the transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1) ion channel plays a key role in promoting airway inflammation in asthma and may mediate effects of paracetamol on asthma, yet confirmatory human data are lacking. To study associations of TRPA1 gene variants with childhood asthma and total IgE concentration, and interactions between TRPA1 and prenatal paracetamol exposure on these outcomes. METHODS: We analysed associations between 31 TRPA1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and current doctor-diagnosed asthma and total IgE concentration at 7...
October 25, 2016: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
Magdy El-Salhy, Tarek Mazzawi, Kazuo Umezawa, Odd Helge Gilja
Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as animal models of human IBD have abnormal enteroendocrine cells. The present study aimed to identify the possible mechanisms underlying these abnormalities. For this purpose, 40 male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups as follows: the control group, the group with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis with no treatment (TNBS group), the group with TNBS-induced colitis treated with 3-[(dodecylthiocarbonyl)-methyl]-glutarimide (DTCM-G; an activator protein-1 inhibitor) (DTCM-G group), and the group with TNBS-induced colitis treated with dehydroxymethylepoxyquinomicin (DHMEQ; a nuclear factor-κB inhibitor) treatment (DHMEQ group)...
October 24, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Medicine
N I Yarushkina, T R Bagaeva, L P Filaretova
Corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is involved in the regulation of pain sensitivity and can induce an analgesic effect in animals and humans. The periaqueductal gray matter (PAGM) of the midbrain is one of the key structures of the antinociceptive system. The aim of the study was to investigate the involvement of CRF receptor type 2 (CRF-R2 receptors), localized in the PAGM, in the analgesic effect caused by central or systemic CRF on somatic pain sensitivity in conscious rats. Somatic pain sensitivity was tested by a tail flick test (measuring tail flick latency induced by tail's thermal stimulation)...
August 2016: Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology: An Official Journal of the Polish Physiological Society
Kavita Singh, Richa Trivedi, Seenu Haridas, Kailash Manda, Subash Khushu
Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is the most common form of TBI (70-90%) with consequences of anxiety-like behavioral alterations in approximately 23% of mTBI cases. This study aimed to assess whether mTBI-induced anxiety-like behavior is a consequence of neurometabolic alterations. mTBI was induced using a weight drop model to simulate mild human brain injury in rodents. Based on injury induction and dosage of anesthesia, four animal groups were included in this study: (i) injury with anesthesia (IA); (ii) sham1 (injury only, IO); (iii) sham2 (only anesthesia, OA); and (iv) control rats...
October 25, 2016: NMR in Biomedicine
Ahmad Kotb, Antonina Klippert, Maria Daskalaki, Ulrike Sauermann, Christiane Stahl-Hennig, Berit Neumann
Granzyme B-expressing (GrB(+)) B cells are thought to contribute to immune dysfunctions in HIV patients, but so far their exact role is unknown. This report demonstrates for the first time the existence of GrB(+) B cells in SIV-infected rhesus macaques, which represent the most commonly used nonhuman primate model for HIV research. Similar to HIV patients, we found significantly higher frequencies of these cells in the blood of chronically SIV-infected rhesus monkeys compared with uninfected healthy ones. These frequencies correlated with plasma viral load and inversely with absolute CD4 T-cell counts...
October 25, 2016: Immunology and Cell Biology
Neha Kamran, Mayuri Chandran, Pedro R Lowenstein, Maria G Castro
Various preclinical studies have demonstrated that the success of immunotherapeutic strategies in inhibiting tumor progression in animal models of Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). It is also evident that tumor-induced immune suppression drastically impacts the efficacy of immune based therapies. Among the mechanisms employed by GBM to induce immunosuppression is the accumulation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). Advancing our understanding about the pathways regulating the expansion, accumulation and activity of MDSCs will allow for the development of therapies aimed at abolishing the inhibitory effect of these cells on immunotherapeutic approaches...
October 21, 2016: Clinical Immunology: the Official Journal of the Clinical Immunology Society
Smitha Kakde, Raj S Bhopal, Swati Bhardwaj, Anoop Misra
OBJECTIVE: Known risk factors do not fully explain the comparatively high susceptibility to coronary heart disease (CHD) in South Asians (Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi, and Sri Lankan populations in South Asia and overseas). The search for explanatory hypotheses and cofactors that raise susceptibility of South Asians to CHD continues. The aim of this study was to propose "the high-heat food preparation hypothesis," where neo-formed contaminants (NFCs) such as trans-fatty acids (TFAs) and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are the cofactors...
July 26, 2016: Nutrition
Laura J Waters, Dina S Shokry, Gareth M B Parkes, John C Mitchell
Human intestinal absorption (HIA) will dictate biopharmaceutical performance through its influence on absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination and can vary significantly depending upon the nature of the compound under consideration. In this study, an in vitro assay method is proposed for the prediction of HIA through the measurement of drug solubility in an aqueous phase containing micellar bile salt, namely sodium deoxycholate. A series of twenty compounds, displaying a range of physicochemical properties and known HIA values, were analyzed using UV spectroscopy to determine a solubilization ratio for each compound...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Pharmaceutical Sciences
During recent decades, researchers have used several different parameters to evaluate the biological and health effects of in vitro and in vivo exposure to non-ionizing radiofrequency fields in animals, humans and their isolated cells. The data reported in many of publications in peer-reviewed scientific journals were reviewed by the international and national expert groups of scientists for human risk assessment of exposure to radiofrequency fields. The criteria used for such assessment depended on the study design, methodology and reporting of the data in the publication...
November 1, 2016: Mutation Research
M G Candela, A Caballol, P M Atance
Assessment of the role of wild and domestic hosts as potential reservoirs of misdiagnosed zoonoses, such as Q fever by Coxiella burnetii, is an important public health issue today both for wildlife conservation and management of disease in human-livestock-wildlife interface. This study used ELISA, an indirect antibody, to research (2003-2013) C. burnetii infection in seven free-living wild and domestic ruminant species and in European wildcats (Felis silvestris). The animals studied were 0 European wildcats, 21 Spanish ibex (Capra pyrenaica), 314 red deer (Cervus elaphus), 556 fallow deer (Dama dama), 211 European mouflon (Ovis aries musimon), eight roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), 407 bovines (Bos taurus) and 3739 sheep (Ovis aries)...
October 25, 2016: Epidemiology and Infection
Kristian Tonby, Ida Wergeland, Nora V Lieske, Dag Kvale, Kjetil Tasken, Anne M Dyrhol-Riise
BACKGROUND: Tuberculosis (TB) causes a major burden on global health with long and cumbersome TB treatment regimens. Host-directed immune modulating therapies have been suggested as adjunctive treatment to TB antibiotics. Upregulated cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling pathway may cause a dysfunctional immune response that favors survival and replication of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). METHODS: Blood samples were obtained from patients with latent TB (n = 9) and active TB (n = 33) before initiation of anti-TB chemotherapy...
October 24, 2016: BMC Infectious Diseases
G Besson, G Barragan-Jason, S J Thorpe, M Fabre-Thorpe, S Puma, M Ceccaldi, E J Barbeau
Verifying that a face is from a target person (e.g. finding someone in the crowd) is a critical ability of the human face processing system. Yet how fast this can be performed is unknown. The 'entry-level shift due to expertise' hypothesis suggests that - since humans are face experts - processing faces should be as fast - or even faster - at the individual than at superordinate levels. In contrast, the 'superordinate advantage' hypothesis suggests that faces are processed from coarse to fine, so that the opposite pattern should be observed...
October 21, 2016: Cognition
Koji M Nishiguchi, Yu Yokoyama, Yusuke Fujii, Kosuke Fujita, Yusuke Tomiyama, Ryo Kawasaki, Toshinori Furukawa, Fumiko Ono, Nobuhiro Shimozawa, Mutsumi Togo, Michihiro Suzuki, Toru Nakazawa
Age-dependent formation of macular drusen caused by the focal accumulation of extracellular deposits beneath the retinal pigment epithelium precede the development of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. It is established that inflammation contributes to the pathogenesis of drusen and AMD. However, development of a preemptive therapeutic strategy targeting macular drusen and AMD has been impeded by the lack of relevant animal models because most laboratory animals lack macula, an anatomic feature present only in humans and a subset of monkeys...
2016: PloS One
Thomas F Giustino, Paul J Fitzgerald, Stephen Maren
The medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) plays a crucial role in emotional learning and memory in rodents and humans. While many studies suggest a differential role for the prelimbic (PL) and infralimbic (IL) subdivisions of mPFC, few have considered the relationship between neural activity in these two brain regions recorded simultaneously in behaving animals. Importantly, how concurrent PL and IL activity relate to conditioned freezing behavior is largely unknown. Here we used single-unit recordings targeting PL and IL in awake, behaving rats during the acquisition and expression of conditioned fear...
2016: PloS One
Johan U Lind, Travis A Busbee, Alexander D Valentine, Francesco S Pasqualini, Hongyan Yuan, Moran Yadid, Sung-Jin Park, Arda Kotikian, Alexander P Nesmith, Patrick H Campbell, Joost J Vlassak, Jennifer A Lewis, Kevin K Parker
Biomedical research has relied on animal studies and conventional cell cultures for decades. Recently, microphysiological systems (MPS), also known as organs-on-chips, that recapitulate the structure and function of native tissues in vitro, have emerged as a promising alternative. However, current MPS typically lack integrated sensors and their fabrication requires multi-step lithographic processes. Here, we introduce a facile route for fabricating a new class of instrumented cardiac microphysiological devices via multimaterial three-dimensional (3D) printing...
October 24, 2016: Nature Materials
Lynnette R Ferguson, Matthew P G Barnett
For many years, there has been confusion about the role that nutrition plays in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). It is apparent that good dietary advice for one individual may prove inappropriate for another. As with many diseases, genome-wide association studies across large collaborative groups have been important in revealing the role of genetics in IBD, with more than 200 genes associated with susceptibility to the disease. These associations provide clues to explain the differences in nutrient requirements among individuals...
October 21, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
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