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Fetal life

Jill A McKay, Long Xie, Michiel Adriaens, Chris T Evelo, Dianne Ford, John C Mathers
Growing evidence supports the hypothesis that the in utero environment can have profound implications for fetal development and later life offspring health. Current theory suggests conditions experienced in utero prepare, or "programme", the fetus for its anticipated post-natal environment. The mechanisms responsible for these programming events are poorly understood but are likely to involve gene expression changes. Folate is essential for normal fetal development and inadequate maternal folate supply during pregnancy has long term adverse effects for offspring...
October 22, 2016: Nutrients
B Hirschmugl, G Desoye, P Catalano, I Klymiuk, H Scharnagl, S Payr, E Kitzinger, C Schliefsteiner, U Lang, C Wadsack, S Hauguel-de Mouzon
BACKGROUND: Obesity before pregnancy is associated with impaired metabolic status of the mother and the offspring later in life. These adverse effects have been attributed to epigenetic changes in utero, but little is known about the role of placental metabolism and its contribution to fetal development. OBJECTIVES: We examined the impact of maternal pre-pregnancy obesity on the expression of genes involved in placental lipid metabolism in lean and obese women. SUBJECTS/METHODS: Seventy-three lean and obese women with healthy pregnancy were recruited at term elective cesarean delivery...
October 26, 2016: International Journal of Obesity: Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
Stephanie R Wesolowski, Karim C El Kasmi, Karen R Jonscher, Jacob E Friedman
Changes in the maternal environment leading to an altered intrauterine milieu can result in subtle insults to the fetus, promoting increased lifetime disease risk and/or disease acceleration in childhood and later in life. Particularly worrisome is that the prevalence of NAFLD is rapidly increasing among children and adults, and is being diagnosed at increasingly younger ages, pointing towards an early-life origin. A wealth of evidence, in humans and non-human primates, suggests that maternal nutrition affects the placenta and fetal tissues, leading to persistent changes in hepatic metabolism, mitochondrial function, the intestinal microbiota, liver macrophage activation and susceptibility to NASH postnatally...
October 26, 2016: Nature Reviews. Gastroenterology & Hepatology
Shao-Hua Xie, Jesper Lagergren
The Chinese famine in 1958-1962 was one of the worst in human history, but its potential influence on cancer risks is uncertain. Using cancer incidence data in Shanghai, China, during 1983-2007, we calculated age-specific incidence rates of gastrointestinal cancers in birth cohorts exposed to the Chinese famine in different periods of life and a non-exposed reference cohort. Age-period-cohort regressions estimated the overall relative risks of gastrointestinal cancers in each birth cohort. A total of 212,098 new cases of gastrointestinal cancer were identified during the study period (129,233 males and 82,865 females), among whom 18,146 had esophageal cancer, 71,011 gastric cancer, 55,864 colorectal cancer, 42,751 liver cancer, 9,382 gallbladder cancer, and 14,944 had pancreatic cancer...
October 25, 2016: International Journal of Cancer. Journal International du Cancer
Katinka Karenberg, Hannes Hudalla, David Frommhold
Impaired cellular innate immune defense accounts for susceptibility to sepsis and its high morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. Leukocyte recruitment is an integral part of the cellular immune response and follows a well-defined cascade of events from rolling of leukocytes along the endothelium to firm adhesion and finally transmigration which is concerted by a variety of adhesion molecules. Recent analytical advances such as fetal intravital microscopy have granted new insights into ontogenetic regulation and maturation of fetal immune cell recruitment...
December 2016: Molecular and Cellular Pediatrics
Zoe Daniel, Angelina Swali, Richard Emes, Simon C Langley-Evans
BACKGROUND: Fetal exposure to a maternal low protein diet during rat pregnancy is associated with hypertension, renal dysfunction and metabolic disturbance in adult life. These effects are present when dietary manipulations target only the first half of pregnancy. It was hypothesised that early gestation protein restriction would impact upon placental gene expression and that this may give clues to the mechanism which links maternal diet to later consequences. METHODS: Pregnant rats were fed control or a low protein diet from conception to day 13 gestation...
2016: Genes & Nutrition
Takeshi Nishimura, Keisuke Kohama, Takaaki Osako, Taihei Yamada, Hiroyuki Tanaka, Atsunori Nakao, Joji Kotani
Advances in critical care medicine have made it possible to sustain vital organ systems in brain-dead patients. One clinical scenario besides donor organ retrieval in which a benefit may be gained from continuing life support is pregnancy. A pregnant woman in her late 30's at 23 weeks gestation exhibiting worsening depression was referred to the Department of Psychiatry. One day after admission she attempted suicide by hanging and suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest. A fetal heart beat and fetal motion was confirmed immediately after resuscitation...
October 2016: Acta Medica Okayama
Gavino Faa, Mirko Manchia, Roberta Pintus, Clara Gerosa, Maria Antonietta Marcialis, Vassilios Fanos
Starting from the Developmental Origins of Health and Disease (DOHaD) hypotheses proposed by David Barker, namely fetal programming, in the past years, there is a growing evidence of the major role played by epigenetic factors during the intrauterine life and the perinatal period. Furthermore, it has been assessed that these factors can affect the health status in infancy and even in adulthood. In this review, we focus our attention on the fetal programming of the brain, analyzing the most recent literature concerning the epigenetic factors that can influence the development of neuropsychiatric disorders such as bipolar disorders, major depressive disorders, and schizophrenia...
October 24, 2016: Birth Defects Research. Part C, Embryo Today: Reviews
Connie F Matthiesen, Anne-Helene Tauson
BACKGROUND: Malnutrition in fetal life and during suckling have in some animal studies resulted in adaptive changes related to the fat and glucose metabolism, which in the long term might predispose the offspring for metabolic disorders such as obesity later in life. The objective was to study the effect of fetal life malnutrition in male mink on the gene expression of leptin and adiponectin in different adipose tissue sites. RESULTS: Thirty-two male mink, strict carnivore species, exposed to low (FL) or adequate (FA) protein provision the last 16...
October 20, 2016: Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
Y Yu, S Cnattingius, J Olsen, E T Parner, M Vestergaard, Z Liew, N Zhao, J Li
BACKGROUND: The loss of a close relative is one of the most stressful life events. In pregnancy, this experience has been associated with a higher risk of fetal death and under-five mortality, but little is known about potential effects on long-term mortality in offspring. We examined the association between prenatal maternal bereavement and mortality in a cohort of 5.3 million children followed until up to 37 years of age. METHOD: The population-based cohort study included 5 253 508 live singleton births in Denmark (1973-2004) and Sweden (1973-2006)...
October 20, 2016: Psychological Medicine
Ellis Voerman, Vincent W V Jaddoe, Oscar H Franco, Eric A P Steegers, Romy Gaillard
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We aimed to identify critical periods and specific longitudinal growth patterns from fetal life onwards associated with childhood insulin and C-peptide levels. METHODS: In a prospective population-based cohort study of 4328 children, we repeatedly measured (femur) length and (estimated fetal) weight from the second trimester of fetal life until 6 years of age. BMI was calculated from 6 months onwards. Insulin and C-peptide levels were measured at 6 years of age...
October 18, 2016: Diabetologia
Sarah Schalekamp-Timmermans, Jerome Cornette, Albert Hofman, Willem A Helbing, Vincent W V Jaddoe, Eric A P Steegers, Bero O Verburg
BACKGROUND: There are sex differences in the risk of development of cardiovascular disease (CVD). According to the developmental origins of health and disease paradigm (DOHaD), CVD originates in fetal life. This study examines fetal sex differences in cardiovascular development in utero. METHODS: In 1028 pregnant women, we assessed fetal circulation using pulsed wave Doppler examinations between 28 and 34 weeks gestation. To test associations between fetal sex and fetal circulation measurements, linear regression models were used adjusting for fetal size, gestational age, and fetal heart rate...
2016: Biology of Sex Differences
Suzanne Oparil
Heart disease, stroke, and kidney failure are leading causes of death worldwide, and hypertension is a significant risk factor for each. Hypertension is less common in women, compared to men, in those younger than 45 years of age. This trend is reversed in those 65 years and older. In the US between 2011-2014, the prevalence of hypertension in women and men by age group was 6% vs 8% (18-39 years), 30% vs 35% (40-59 years), and 67% vs 63% (60 years and over). Awareness, treatment, and control rates differ between genders with women being more aware of their diagnosis (85% vs 80%), more likely to take their medications (81% vs 71%) and more frequently having controlled hypertension (55% vs 49%)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Peter Nilsson
During more than 50 years the high cardiovascular risk in Eastern Europe and former Soviet Union, now Russia, has been described as very high. This is based on epidemiological findings from countries and regions, for example within the MONICA study as organized by the WHO. One common explanation is that this is influenced by an adverse cardiovascular risk factor profile including high prevalence rates of hypertension in many subjects, in combination with unhealthy lifestyle (smoking, alcohol, diet) and stressful social conditions, including health care gaps...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Patricio Lopez-Jaramillo
Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are major causes of death and illness worldwide. In recent decades an increased prevalence of CVD mortality has been reported in low-medium income countries, which has been associated with changes in life styles, deficiencies in health systems and the persistence of social inequities.The metabolic syndrome comprises a cluster of cardiometabolic risk factors, with insulin resistance and increased adiposity as its central features. Identifying individuals with metabolic syndrome is important due to its association with an increased risk of coronary heart disease and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2)...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Chia Lin Chang, Chia Yu Chang, Da Xian Lee, Po Jen Cheng
Pre-eclampsia is a pregnancy-specific hypertensive disorder that affects 2-8 % of pregnancies. This disorder can lead to seizure, multi-organ failure and maternal death. The best approach to prevent pre-eclampsia-associated adverse outcomes is to be able to prevent pre-eclampsia as early as possible. Unfortunately, current diagnostic methods are ineffective at predicting the risk of pre-eclampsia during early pregnancy. In humans, low levels of a group of placenta-derived Pregnancy Specific Glycoproteins (PSGs) have been associated with intrauterine growth retardation and pre-eclampsia and there is a significant enrichment of cases with deletions in the PSG gene locus in pre-eclampsia patients...
2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Yimei Dai, Lu Zhu, Zhibin Huang, Minyu Zhou, Wan Jin, Wei Liu, Mengchang Xu, Tao Yu, Yiyue Zhang, Zilong Wen, Wangjun Liao, Wenqing Zhang
In vertebrates, myeloid cells arise from multiple waves of development: the first or embryonic wave of myelopoiesis initiates early from non-hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) precursors and gives rise to myeloid cells transiently during early development; whereas the second or adult wave of myelopoiesis emerges later from HSCs and produces myeloid cells continually during fetal and adult life. In the past decades, a great deal has been learnt about the development of myeloid cells from adult myelopoiesis, yet the genetic network governing embryonic myelopoiesis remains poorly defined...
September 3, 2016: Journal of Genetics and Genomics, Yi Chuan Xue Bao
Fulvia Gloria-Bottini, Anna Neri, Luca Coppeta, Andrea Magrini, Egidio Bottini
OBJECTIVE: The birth weight/placental weight ratio has an important predictive value for perinatal mortality and morbidity and for cardiovascular diseases in adult life. In this study, we compared the birth weight/placental weight (BW/PW) ratio and the correlation between the two parameters in diabetic women with that observed in healthy women. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 347 consecutive newborn infants from healthy puerperae, 164 newborns from puerperae with gestational diabetes, 148 newborns from puerperae with preexisting type 1 diabetes, and 40 newborns from puerperae with preexisting type 2 diabetes have been studied from the White population of Rome...
October 2016: Taiwanese Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology
Christine K Wagner, Princy Quadros-Mennella
Steroid hormones activate nuclear receptors which, as transcription factors, can regulate critical aspects of neural development. Many regions of the rat forebrain, midbrain and hindbrain express progestin receptors (PR) during perinatal life, suggesting that progesterone may play an important role in the development of the brain. An immunohistochemical approach using two antibodies with differential recognition of ligand-bound PR was used to examine whether fetuses are exposed to maternal progesterone during pregnancy and whether progesterone from maternal circulation can bind to PR within the fetal brain...
October 14, 2016: Developmental Neurobiology
Jens Henrichs, Viki Verfaille, Laura Viester, Myrte Westerneng, Bert Molewijk, Arie Franx, Henriette van der Horst, Judith E Bosmans, Ank de Jonge, Petra Jellema
BACKGROUND: Intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) is a major risk factor for perinatal mortality and morbidity. Thus, there is a compelling need to introduce sensitive measures to detect IUGR fetuses. Routine third trimester ultrasonography is increasingly used to detect IUGR. However, we lack evidence for its clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness and information on ethical considerations of additional third trimester ultrasonography. This nationwide stepped wedge cluster-randomized trial examines the (cost-)effectiveness of routine third trimester ultrasonography in reducing severe adverse perinatal outcome through subsequent protocolized management...
October 13, 2016: BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
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