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Elizabeth H Skinner, Tammy Dinh, Melissa Hewitt, Ross Piper, Claire Thwaites
BACKGROUND: Falls are associated with morbidity, loss of independence, and mortality. While land-based group exercise and Tai Chi programs reduce the risk of falls, aquatic therapy may allow patients to complete balance exercises with less pain and fear of falling; however, limited data exist. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to pilot the implementation of an aquatic group based on Ai Chi principles (Aquabalance) and to evaluate the safety, intervention acceptability, and intervention effect sizes...
October 6, 2016: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
Aileen Wk Chan, Doris Sf Yu, K C Choi, Diana Tf Lee, Janet Wh Sit, Helen Yl Chan
PURPOSE: Age-related cognitivee decline is a growing public health concern worldwide. More than a quarter of adults with cognitive impairment experience sleep disturbance. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the preliminary effects of tai chi qigong (TCQ) on improving the night-time sleep quality of older adults with cognitive impairment. PARTICIPANTS: Older adults with cognitive impairment who complain of sleep disturbance. METHODS: A randomized controlled trial with two groups...
2016: Clinical Interventions in Aging
Duong-Minh Nguyen, Isabelle Laffont, Arnaud Dupeyron
OBJECTIVE: Martial arts are physical and meditative discipline available as complementary strategies able to improve functional capacity, physical performances, postural control of patients suffering from chronical diseases. They can probably slow their clinical evolution. The objective of this communication is a review of the literature about the effects of martial arts training into a said chronical disease. MATERIAL/PATIENTS AND METHODS: A literature research in PubMed and Pedro databases was performed with the following keywords: martial arts, rehabilitation, chronic disease, neurologic disorders, heart disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, musculo-squelettal disorders, low back pain...
September 2016: Annals of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine
Yan Ma, Alicia Yeung, Albert C Yang, Chung-Kang Peng, Alisabet Clain, Jonathan Alpert, Maurizio Fava, Albert S Yeung
OBJECTIVE: This pilot study evaluated the effects of Tai Chi training on sleep quality (primary outcomes), and depression and social functioning levels (secondary outcomes) among patients with depression. PARTICIPANTS: Sixteen depressed Chinese patients. METHODS: Participants received 1-hr Tai Chi training sessions 2 times per week for 10 weeks. Patients' subjective sleep quality ratings, objective sleep quality measurements, and depression and social functioning levels were measured before, during, and after the intervention...
September 27, 2016: Behavioral Sleep Medicine
Weidong Wang, Fang Wang, Feng Fan, Ana Cristina Sedas, Jian Wang
PURPOSE: The aim of this study is to identify and assess evidence related to the efficacy of mind-body interventions on irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) in the Chinese population. METHOD: Drawn from Chinese databases, nine RCTs and three Q-E studies were included in the systematic review. The methodological quality of RCTs was evaluated based on the following criteria: adequate sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, completeness of outcome data, selective reporting, and other potential biases...
September 19, 2016: International Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Wen-Dien Chang, Shuya Chen, Chia-Lun Lee, Hung-Yu Lin, Ping-Tung Lai
Purpose. To conduct a meta-analysis and systematic review examining whether Tai Chi Chuan could have mental and physical benefits for patients with knee osteoarthritis. Methods. MEDLINE, PUBMED, EMBASE, and CINAHL databases were searched for relevant studies. Data of the studies were collected, and outcomes were classified using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health model. Effect sizes of the mental and physical components were determined, along with the recommendation grades of Philadelphia Panel Classification System for Tai Chi Chuan on knee osteoarthritis...
2016: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine: ECAM
Amanda Hall, Bethan Copsey, Helen Richmond, Jacqueline Thompson, Manuela Ferreira, Jane Latimer, Chris G Maher
BACKGROUND: Tai chi is recommended for musculoskeletal conditions, however, the evidence for its clinical effectiveness is uncertain. PURPOSE: To determine whether tai chi is beneficial for clinical outcomes in people with musculoskeletal pain. DATA SOURCES: Seven databases EMBASE, PEDro, AMED, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Sport Discus, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. STUDY SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials of tai chi for people with a chronic musculoskeletal condition were included...
September 15, 2016: Physical Therapy
Valeska Gatica-Rojas, Ricardo Cartes-Velásquez, Rodrigo Salgado-Méndez, Rodolfo Castro-Ramírez
[Purpose] This study aimed to determine the correlation between center of pressure and functional balance in non-faller elderly practitioners of Tai Chi. [Subjects and Methods] For the study, nine non-faller elderly practitioners of Tai Chi who were able to maintain a standing posture and walk independently were recruited. Timed one-leg standing and timed up-and-go tests were used as functional balance tests and force platform to measure the center of pressure. The Pearson correlation coefficient was calculated for the timed up-and-go/timed one-leg standing test scores and center of pressure parameter values...
August 2016: Journal of Physical Therapy Science
Richard L Nahin, Robin Boineau, Partap S Khalsa, Barbara J Stussman, Wendy J Weber
Although most pain is acute and resolves within a few days or weeks, millions of Americans have persistent or recurring pain that may become chronic and debilitating. Medications may provide only partial relief from this chronic pain and can be associated with unwanted effects. As a result, many individuals turn to complementary health approaches as part of their pain management strategy. This article examines the clinical trial evidence for the efficacy and safety of several specific approaches-acupuncture, manipulation, massage therapy, relaxation techniques including meditation, selected natural product supplements (chondroitin, glucosamine, methylsulfonylmethane, S-adenosylmethionine), tai chi, and yoga-as used to manage chronic pain and related disability associated with back pain, fibromyalgia, osteoarthritis, neck pain, and severe headaches or migraines...
September 2016: Mayo Clinic Proceedings
Ruiying Kang, Yeqing Wu, Zhiwu Li, Jun Jiang, Qi Gao, Yuncui Yu, Keming Gao, Yuxiang Yan, Yan He
BACKGROUND: Antipsychotic drugs are limited in their ability to improve negative symptoms, quality of life, and medication adherence in patients with schizophrenia. The addition of nonpharmacological interventions like social skills training has a positive effect on medication adherence and decreases rehospitalization rates but is limited in improving patients' symptoms, aggressive behaviors, and quality of life. Aerobic exercise, especially Tai-chi, can potentially reduce psychopathological and negative symptoms, decrease aggressive behaviors, and improve quality of life...
September 2, 2016: Psychopathology
Benjamin Kligler, Raymond Teets, Melissa Quick
Significant evidence supports the effectiveness and safety of several complementary or integrative treatment approaches to common primary care problems. Acupuncture is effective in the management of chronic low back pain. Mind-body interventions such as cognitive behavior therapy, yoga, tai chi, qi gong, and music therapy may be helpful for treating insomnia. Exercise can reduce anxiety symptoms. Herbal preparations and nutritional supplements can be useful as first-line therapy for certain conditions, such as fish oil for hypertriglyceridemia, St...
September 1, 2016: American Family Physician
Chi-Hsien Peng, Jen-Hua Chuang, Mong-Lien Wang, Yong-Yu Jhan, Ke-Hung Chien, Yu-Chien Chung, Kuo-Hsuan Hung, Chia-Ching Chang, Chao-Kuei Lee, Wei-Lien Tseng, De-Kuang Hwang, Chia-Hsien Hsu, Tai-Chi Lin, Shih-Hwa Chiou, Shih-Jen Chen
Advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) may lead to geographic atrophy or fibrovascular scar at macular, dysfunctional retinal microenvironment, and cause profound visual loss. Recent clinical trials have implied the potential application of pluripotent cell-differentiated retinal pigment epithelial cells (dRPEs) and membranous scaffolds implantation in repairing the degenerated retina in AMD. However, the efficacy of implanted membrane in immobilization and supporting the viability and functions of dRPEs, as well as maintaining the retinal microenvironment is still unclear...
August 22, 2016: Oncotarget
Yin Wu, Hayley V MacDonald, Linda S Pescatello
OBJECTIVES: To develop an evaluation instrument to determine to what extent Tai Chi interventions aimed at improving the balance of older adults disclosed their exercise prescription (Ex Rx ) and instructional methods and met best-practice exercise recommendations for balance improvement. DESIGN: Review. SETTING: PubMed, Scopus, and CINAHL databases were searched from their inception until August 22, 2014. PARTICIPANTS: Adults aged 60 and older without debilitating disease...
August 22, 2016: Journal of the American Geriatrics Society
Jennifer McQuade, Sarah Prinsloo, David Z Chang, Amy Spelman, Qi Wei, Karen Basen-Engquist, Carol Harrison, Zonghao Zhang, Debra Kuban, Andrew Lee, Lorenzo Cohen
OBJECTIVES: Sleep disturbances and fatigue are common in prostate cancer patients undergoing radiotherapy. Prior research suggests mind-body techniques may improve these outcomes. We conducted a randomized-controlled trial of qigong/tai chi (QGTC) in men with prostate cancer undergoing radiotherapy. METHODS: Men with prostate cancer starting definitive radiation were randomized to one of three groups: (1) QGTC; (2) light exercise (LE); or (3) wait list control (WLC)...
August 22, 2016: Psycho-oncology
Wioletta Dziubek, Katarzyna Bulińska, Mariusz Kusztal, Joanna Kowalska, Łukasz Rogowski, Agnieszka Zembroń-Łacny, Tomasz Gołębiowski, Bartosz Ochmann, Weronika Pawlaczyk, Marian Klinger, Marek Woźniewski
UNLABELLED: Introduction. Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) have poor physical performance and exercise capacity due to frequent dialysis treatments. Tai Chi exercises can be very useful in the area of rehabilitation of people with ESRD. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to assess exercise capacity in ESRD patients participating in 6-month Tai Chi training. Patients and Methods. Twenty dialysis patients from Wroclaw took part in the training; at the end of the project, 14 patients remained (age 69...
2016: Evidence-based Complementary and Alternative Medicine: ECAM
Linda Larkey, Jennifer Huberty, Maja Pedersen, Karen Weihs
INTRODUCTION: Breast cancer survivors (BCSs) often report fatigue that persists for years following treatment. Despite a growing body of evidence for meditative movement practices to improve symptoms among BCSs, few studies have explored using Qigong/Tai Chi to reduce fatigue. Additionally, few have examined the biological mechanisms through which fatigue may be reduced using Qigong/Tai Chi. METHODS/STUDY DESIGN: We will recruit 250 fatigued, post-menopausal women diagnosed with breast cancer (stage 0-III), between 6months and 5years past primary treatment and randomize to a standardized Qigong/Tai Chi Easy (QG/TCE) intervention, a "sham" Qigong group (movements without a focus on the breath and meditative state) (SQG), or an educational support (ES) group...
September 2016: Contemporary Clinical Trials
Vicky Booth, Victoria Hood, Fiona Kearney
BACKGROUND: Cognitive impairment is a risk factor for falls. Older adults with cognitive impairment (such as dementia) have an increased risk of falling compared with age-matched individuals without a cognitive impairment. To reduce falls in this population, interventions could theoretically target and train both physical and cognitive abilities. Combining and addressing cognitive components in falls rehabilitation is a novel and emerging area of healthcare. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this review was to identify the effectiveness of combined cognitive and physical interventions on the risk of falls in cognitively impaired older adults...
May 2016: JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports
Dongsheng Jiang, Weihong Kong, Joanna J Jiang
BACKGROUND: Physicians encounter various symptom-based complaints each day. While physicians strive to support patients with chronic illnesses, evidence indicates that patients who are actively involved in their health care have better health outcomes and sometimes lower costs. AIM: This article is to analyze how patient engagement is described when complex interventions such as Tai Chi were delivered in randomized controlled clinical trials (RCTs). It reviews the dynamic patient-physician relationship in chronic illness management and to illustrate the patient engagement process, using Tai Chi as an example intervention...
August 15, 2016: Reviews on Recent Clinical Trials
Stanley Sai-Chuen Hui, Yao Jie Xie, Jean Woo, Timothy Chi-Yui Kwok
OBJECTIVE: To examine the effects of Tai Chi and walking training on aerobic fitness, resting energy expenditure (REE), body composition, and quality of life; as well as analyzing the energy metabolism during exercises, to determine which one had better advantage in improving health status. METHODS: Three hundred seventy-four middle-aged Chinese subjects who were recruited from nine geographic areas in Sha Tin were randomized into Tai Chi, walking, or control groups at area level...
August 2016: Complementary Therapies in Medicine
Song Li, Jie Dong, Cheng Cheng, Weidong Le
Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder caused by the selective and progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Although PD has been heavily researched, the precise etiology and pathogenesis for PD are still inconclusive. Consequently, current pharmacological treatments for PD are largely symptomatic rather than preventive and there is still no cure for this disease nowadays. Moreover, nonmotor symptoms caused by intrinsic PD pathology or side effects induced by currently used pharmacological interventions are gaining increasing attention and urgently need to be treated due to their influence on quality of life...
November 2016: Journal of Neural Transmission
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