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Fusiform face area

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28506872/unreliability-of-putative-fmri-biomarkers-during-emotional-face-processing
#1
C L Nord, A Gray, C J Charpentier, O J Robinson, J P Roiser
There is considerable need to develop tailored approaches to psychiatric treatment. Numerous researchers have proposed using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) biomarkers to predict therapeutic response, in particular by measuring task-evoked subgenual anterior cingulate (sgACC) and amygdala activation in mood and anxiety disorders. Translating this to the clinic relies on the assumption that blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) responses in these regions are stable within individuals. To test this assumption, we scanned a group of 29 volunteers twice (mean test-retest interval=14...
May 12, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28472436/the-role-of-experience-in-the-face-selective-response-in-right-ffa
#2
Rankin W McGugin, Katie F Ryan, Benjamin J Tamber-Rosenau, Isabel Gauthier
The expertise hypothesis suggests the fusiform face area (FFA) is more responsive to faces than to other categories because of experience individuating faces. Accordingly, individual differences in FFA's selectivity for faces should relate to differences in behavioral face-recognition ability. However, previous studies have not demonstrated this, while the comparable association is often observed with nonface objects. We created a training paradigm with conditions sufficient to observe the same effect with faces...
May 3, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28451634/position-information-encoded-by-population-activity-in-hierarchical-visual-areas
#3
Kei Majima, Paul Sukhanov, Tomoyasu Horikawa, Yukiyasu Kamitani
Neurons in high-level visual areas respond to more complex visual features with broader receptive fields (RFs) compared to those in low-level visual areas. Thus, high-level visual areas are generally considered to carry less information regarding the position of seen objects in the visual field. However, larger RFs may not imply loss of position information at the population level. Here, we evaluated how accurately the position of a seen object could be predicted (decoded) from activity patterns in each of six representative visual areas with different RF sizes [V1-V4, lateral occipital complex (LOC), and fusiform face area (FFA)]...
March 2017: ENeuro
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424398/-brodmann-areas-27-28-36-and-37-the-parahippocampal-and-the-fusiform-gyri
#4
Satoshi Eifuku
First, Brodmann areas 27, 28, 36 and 37, were anatomically defined in the beginning of this review. These areas exist in the parahippocampal or fusiform gyrus of the ventral temporal lobe in humans. Subsequently, the current understanding of their functions was summarized on the basis of recent findings mainly through human functional neuroimaging studies and animal studies. Rodent studies have shown the existence of neuronal activities for representing space, such as those involving head-direction cells or grid cells, in areas 27 (the parasubicular cortex) and 28 (the ventral entorhinal cortex)...
April 2017: Brain and Nerve, Shinkei Kenkyū No Shinpo
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28412511/difference-in-neural-response-to-social-exclusion-observation-and-subsequent-altruism-between-adolescents-and-adults
#5
Béatrice Tousignant, Fanny Eugène, Katia Sirois, Philip L Jackson
Empathy and prosocial behaviors toward peers promote successful social development and creation of significant long-term relationships, but surprisingly little is known about the maturation of these skills during the period of adolescence. As the majority of studies have used questionnaires or pain observation paradigms, it remains unknown whether the empathic response of adolescents differs from that of adults in a paradigm that is closer to everyday life. In the current study, fMRI was used to examine the neural correlates of social exclusion observation and subsequent prosocial behavior in 20 adolescents (aged 12-17 years) and 20 adults (aged 22-30 years) while playing a ball-tossing game with what they believed to be real individuals...
April 12, 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28391034/the-structural-and-functional-correlates-of-the-efficiency-in-fearful-face-detection
#6
Yongchao Wang, Nana Guo, Li Zhao, Hui Huang, Xiaonan Yao, Na Sang, Xin Hou, Yu Mao, Taiyong Bi, Jiang Qiu
Human visual system is found to be much efficient in searching for a fearful face. Some individuals are more sensitive to this threat-related stimulus. However, we still know little about the neural correlates of such variability. In the current study, we exploited a visual search paradigm, and asked the subjects to search for a fearful face or a target gender. Every subject showed a shallower search function for fearful face search than face gender search, indicating a stable fearful face advantage. We then used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analysis and correlated this advantage to the gray matter volume (GMV) of some presumably face related cortical areas...
April 5, 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28345189/tuning-face-perception-with-electrical-stimulation-of-the-fusiform-gyrus
#7
Corey J Keller, Ido Davidesco, Pierre Megevand, Fred A Lado, Rafael Malach, Ashesh D Mehta
The fusiform gyrus (FG) is an important node in the face processing network, but knowledge of its causal role in face perception is currently limited. Recent work demonstrated that high frequency stimulation applied to the FG distorts the perception of faces in human subjects (Parvizi et al. []: J Neurosci 32:14915-14920). However, the timing of this process in the FG relative to stimulus onset and the spatial extent of FG's role in face perception are unknown. Here, we investigate the causal role of the FG in face perception by applying precise, event-related electrical stimulation (ES) to higher order visual areas including the FG in six human subjects undergoing intracranial monitoring for epilepsy...
June 2017: Human Brain Mapping
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28290075/audio-visual-speech-perception-in-adult-readers-with-dyslexia-an-fmri-study
#8
Jascha Rüsseler, Zheng Ye, Ivonne Gerth, Gregor R Szycik, Thomas F Münte
Developmental dyslexia is a specific deficit in reading and spelling that often persists into adulthood. In the present study, we used slow event-related fMRI and independent component analysis to identify brain networks involved in perception of audio-visual speech in a group of adult readers with dyslexia (RD) and a group of fluent readers (FR). Participants saw a video of a female speaker saying a disyllabic word. In the congruent condition, audio and video input were identical whereas in the incongruent condition, the two inputs differed...
March 13, 2017: Brain Imaging and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28279012/unsuppressible-repetition-suppression-and-exemplar-specific-expectation-suppression-in-the-fusiform-face-area
#9
Auréliane Pajani, Sid Kouider, Paul Roux, Vincent de Gardelle
Recent work casts Repetition Suppression (RS), i.e. the reduced neural response to repeated stimuli, as the consequence of reduced surprise for repeated inputs. This research, along with other studies documenting Expectation Suppression, i.e. reduced responses to expected stimuli, emphasizes the role of expectations and predictive codes in perception. Here, we use fMRI to further characterize the nature of predictive signals in the human brain. Prior to scanning, participants were implicitly exposed to associations within face pairs...
December 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28263416/the-effect-of-reward-expectation-on-the-time-course-of-perceptual-decisions
#10
Annalisa Tosoni, Giorgia Committeri, Cinzia Calluso, Gaspare Galati
Perceptual discriminations can be strongly biased by the expected reward for a correct decision but the neural mechanisms underlying this influence are still partially unclear. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during a task requiring to arbitrarily associate a visual stimulus with a specific action, we have recently shown that perceptual decisions are encoded within the same sensory-motor regions responsible for planning and executing specific motor actions. Here we examined whether these regions additionally encode the amount of expected reward for a perceptual decision...
March 6, 2017: European Journal of Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28215697/directed-network-discovery-with-dynamic-network-modelling
#11
Stefano Anzellotti, Dorit Kliemann, Nir Jacoby, Rebecca Saxe
Cognitive tasks recruit multiple brain regions. Understanding how these regions influence each other (the network structure) is an important step to characterize the neural basis of cognitive processes. Often, limited evidence is available to restrict the range of hypotheses a priori, and techniques that sift efficiently through a large number of possible network structures are needed (network discovery). This article introduces a novel modelling technique for network discovery (Dynamic Network Modelling or DNM) that builds on ideas from Granger Causality and Dynamic Causal Modelling introducing three key changes: (1) efficient network discovery is implemented with statistical tests on the consistency of model parameters across participants, (2) the tests take into account the magnitude and sign of each influence, and (3) variance explained in independent data is used as an absolute (rather than relative) measure of the quality of the network model...
May 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28193532/age-dependent-atypicalities-in-body-and-face-sensitive-activation-of-the-eba-and-ffa-in-individuals-with-asd
#12
Yuko Okamoto, Hirotaka Kosaka, Ryo Kitada, Ayumi Seki, Hiroki C Tanabe, Masamichi J Hayashi, Takanori Kochiyama, Daisuke N Saito, Hisakazu T Yanaka, Toshio Munesue, Makoto Ishitobi, Masao Omori, Yuji Wada, Hidehiko Okazawa, Tatsuya Koeda, Norihiro Sadato
Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have difficuly in recognizing bodies and faces, which are more pronounced in children than adults. If such difficulties originate from dysfunction of the extrastriate body area (EBA) and the fusiform face area (FFA), activation in these regions might be more atypical in children than in adults. We preformed functional magnetic resonance imaging while children and adults with ASD and age-matched typically developed (TD) individuals observed face, body, car, and scene...
February 11, 2017: Neuroscience Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28169088/mapping-structural-covariance-networks-of-facial-emotion-recognition-in-early-psychosis-a-pilot-study
#13
Lisa Buchy, Mariapaola Barbato, Carolina Makowski, Signe Bray, Frank P MacMaster, Stephanie Deighton, Jean Addington
People with psychosis show deficits recognizing facial emotions and disrupted activation in the underlying neural circuitry. We evaluated associations between facial emotion recognition and cortical thickness using a correlation-based approach to map structural covariance networks across the brain. Fifteen people with an early psychosis provided magnetic resonance scans and completed the Penn Emotion Recognition and Differentiation tasks. Fifteen historical controls provided magnetic resonance scans. Cortical thickness was computed using CIVET and analyzed with linear models...
February 3, 2017: Schizophrenia Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28148806/the-quest-for-the-ffa-and-where-it-led
#14
Nancy Kanwisher
This article tells the story behind our first paper on the fusiform face area (FFA): how we chose the question, developed the methods, and followed the data to find the FFA and subsequently many other functionally specialized cortical regions. The paper's impact had less to do with the particular findings in the paper itself and more to do with the method that it promoted and the picture of the human mind and brain that it led to. The use of a functional localizer to define a candidate region in each subject individually enabled us not just to make pictures of brain activation, but also to ask principled, hypothesis-driven questions about a thing in nature...
February 1, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28128087/direct-insertion-of-muscle-fibers-is-not-restricted-to-facial-skin
#15
Uwe Wollina
Facial musculature is divided into masticatory muscles, i.e. M. masseter and M. buccalis, with bony insertions and smaller facial muscles involved in facial expression, which insert into bone and skin. There are four fixed osteocutaneous points of the face, i.e. zygomatic (Mac Gregor), mandibular (Furnas), orbital (Psillakis), and masseteric with an antigravitational effect and functional role in facial expression (1,2). In other body parts, the direct insertion of muscle fibers into skin has not been reported...
December 2016: Acta Dermatovenerologica Croatica: ADC
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28107684/non-invasive-brain-stimulation-targeting-the-right-fusiform-gyrus-selectively-increases-working-memory-for-faces
#16
Tad T Brunyé, Joseph M Moran, Amanda Holmes, Caroline R Mahoney, Holly A Taylor
The human extrastriate cortex contains a region critically involved in face detection and memory, the right fusiform gyrus. The present study evaluated whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeting this anatomical region would selectively influence memory for faces versus non-face objects (houses). Anodal tDCS targeted the right fusiform gyrus (Brodmann's Area 37), with the anode at electrode site PO10, and cathode at FP2. Two stimulation conditions were compared in a repeated-measures design: 0...
April 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100742/visual-sampling-predicts-hippocampal-activity
#17
Zhong-Xu Liu, Kelly Shen, Rosanna K Olsen, Jennifer D Ryan
Eye movements serve to accumulate information from the visual world, contributing to the formation of coherent memory representations that support cognition and behavior. The hippocampus and the oculomotor network are well connected anatomically through an extensive set of polysynaptic pathways. However, the extent to which visual sampling behavior is related to functional responses in the hippocampus during encoding has not been studied directly in human neuroimaging. In the current study, participants engaged in a face processing task while brain responses were recorded with fMRI and eye movements were monitored simultaneously...
January 18, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28079163/steady-state-and-dynamic-network-modes-for-perceptual-expectation
#18
Uk-Su Choi, Yul-Wan Sung, Seiji Ogawa
Perceptual expectation can attenuate repetition suppression, the stimulus-induced neuronal response generated by repeated stimulation, suggesting that repetition suppression is a top-down modulatory phenomenon. However, it is still unclear which high-level brain areas are involved and how they interact with low-level brain areas. Further, the temporal range over which perceptual expectation can effectively attenuate repetition suppression effects remains unclear. To elucidate the details of this top-down modulatory process, we used two short and long inter-stimulus intervals for a perceptual expectation paradigm of paired stimulation...
January 12, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28071765/neural-codes-of-seeing-architectural-styles
#19
Heeyoung Choo, Jack L Nasar, Bardia Nikrahei, Dirk B Walther
Images of iconic buildings, such as the CN Tower, instantly transport us to specific places, such as Toronto. Despite the substantial impact of architectural design on people's visual experience of built environments, we know little about its neural representation in the human brain. In the present study, we have found patterns of neural activity associated with specific architectural styles in several high-level visual brain regions, but not in primary visual cortex (V1). This finding suggests that the neural correlates of the visual perception of architectural styles stem from style-specific complex visual structure beyond the simple features computed in V1...
January 10, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28051770/disentangling-the-representation-of-identity-from-head-view-along-the-human-face-processing-pathway
#20
J Swaroop Guntupalli, Kelsey G Wheeler, M Ida Gobbini
Neural models of a distributed system for face perception implicate a network of regions in the ventral visual stream for recognition of identity. Here, we report a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) neural decoding study in humans that shows that this pathway culminates in the right inferior frontal cortex face area (rIFFA) with a representation of individual identities that has been disentangled from variable visual features in different images of the same person. At earlier stages in the pathway, processing begins in early visual cortex and the occipital face area with representations of head view that are invariant across identities, and proceeds to an intermediate level of representation in the fusiform face area in which identity is emerging but still entangled with head view...
January 1, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
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