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Fusiform face area

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28193532/age-dependent-atypicalities-in-body-and-face-sensitive-activation-of-the-eba-and-ffa-in-individuals-with-asd
#1
Yuko Okamoto, Hirotaka Kosaka, Ryo Kitada, Ayumi Seki, Hiroki C Tanabe, Masamichi J Hayashi, Takanori Kochiyama, Daisuke N Saito, Hisakazu T Yanaka, Toshio Munesue, Makoto Ishitobi, Masao Omori, Yuji Wada, Hidehiko Okazawa, Tatsuya Koeda, Norihiro Sadato
Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have difficuly in recognizing bodies and faces, which are more pronounced in children than adults. If such difficulties originate from dysfunction of the extrastriate body area (EBA) and the fusiform face area (FFA), activation in these regions might be more atypical in children than in adults. We preformed functional magnetic resonance imaging while children and adults with ASD and age-matched typically developed (TD) individuals observed face, body, car, and scene...
February 10, 2017: Neuroscience Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28169088/mapping-structural-covariance-networks-of-facial-emotion-recognition-in-early-psychosis-a-pilot-study
#2
Lisa Buchy, Mariapaola Barbato, Carolina Makowski, Signe Bray, Frank P MacMaster, Stephanie Deighton, Jean Addington
People with psychosis show deficits recognizing facial emotions and disrupted activation in the underlying neural circuitry. We evaluated associations between facial emotion recognition and cortical thickness using a correlation-based approach to map structural covariance networks across the brain. Fifteen people with an early psychosis provided magnetic resonance scans and completed the Penn Emotion Recognition and Differentiation tasks. Fifteen historical controls provided magnetic resonance scans. Cortical thickness was computed using CIVET and analyzed with linear models...
February 3, 2017: Schizophrenia Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28148806/the-quest-for-the-ffa-and-where-it-led
#3
Nancy Kanwisher
This article tells the story behind our first paper on the fusiform face area (FFA): how we chose the question, developed the methods, and followed the data to find the FFA and subsequently many other functionally specialized cortical regions. The paper's impact had less to do with the particular findings in the paper itself and more to do with the method that it promoted and the picture of the human mind and brain that it led to. The use of a functional localizer to define a candidate region in each subject individually enabled us not just to make pictures of brain activation, but also to ask principled, hypothesis-driven questions about a thing in nature...
February 1, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28128087/direct-insertion-of-muscle-fibers-is-not-restricted-to-facial-skin
#4
Uwe Wollina
Facial musculature is divided into masticatory muscles, i.e. M. masseter and M. buccalis, with bony insertions and smaller facial muscles involved in facial expression, which insert into bone and skin. There are four fixed osteocutaneous points of the face, i.e. zygomatic (Mac Gregor), mandibular (Furnas), orbital (Psillakis), and masseteric with an antigravitational effect and functional role in facial expression (1,2). In other body parts, the direct insertion of muscle fibers into skin has not been reported...
December 2016: Acta Dermatovenerologica Croatica: ADC
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28107684/non-invasive-brain-stimulation-targeting-the-right-fusiform-gyrus-selectively-increases-working-memory-for-faces
#5
Tad T Brunyé, Joseph M Moran, Amanda Holmes, Caroline R Mahoney, Holly A Taylor
The human extrastriate cortex contains a region critically involved in face detection and memory, the right fusiform gyrus. The present study evaluated whether transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) targeting this anatomical region would selectively influence memory for faces versus non-face objects (houses). Anodal tDCS targeted the right fusiform gyrus (Brodmann's Area 37), with the anode at electrode site PO10, and cathode at FP2. Two stimulation conditions were compared in a repeated-measures design: 0...
January 17, 2017: Brain and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28100742/visual-sampling-predicts-hippocampal-activity
#6
Zhong-Xu Liu, Kelly Shen, Rosanna K Olsen, Jennifer D Ryan
: Eye movements serve to accumulate information from the visual world, contributing to the formation of coherent memory representations that support cognition and behavior. The hippocampus and the oculomotor network are well connected anatomically through an extensive set of polysynaptic pathways. However, the extent to which visual sampling behavior is related to functional responses in the hippocampus during encoding has not been studied directly in human neuroimaging. In the current study, participants engaged in a face processing task while brain responses were recorded with fMRI and eye movements were monitored simultaneously...
January 18, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28079163/steady-state-and-dynamic-network-modes-for-perceptual-expectation
#7
Uk-Su Choi, Yul-Wan Sung, Seiji Ogawa
Perceptual expectation can attenuate repetition suppression, the stimulus-induced neuronal response generated by repeated stimulation, suggesting that repetition suppression is a top-down modulatory phenomenon. However, it is still unclear which high-level brain areas are involved and how they interact with low-level brain areas. Further, the temporal range over which perceptual expectation can effectively attenuate repetition suppression effects remains unclear. To elucidate the details of this top-down modulatory process, we used two short and long inter-stimulus intervals for a perceptual expectation paradigm of paired stimulation...
January 12, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28071765/neural-codes-of-seeing-architectural-styles
#8
Heeyoung Choo, Jack L Nasar, Bardia Nikrahei, Dirk B Walther
Images of iconic buildings, such as the CN Tower, instantly transport us to specific places, such as Toronto. Despite the substantial impact of architectural design on people's visual experience of built environments, we know little about its neural representation in the human brain. In the present study, we have found patterns of neural activity associated with specific architectural styles in several high-level visual brain regions, but not in primary visual cortex (V1). This finding suggests that the neural correlates of the visual perception of architectural styles stem from style-specific complex visual structure beyond the simple features computed in V1...
January 10, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28051770/disentangling-the-representation-of-identity-from-head-view-along-the-human-face-processing-pathway
#9
J Swaroop Guntupalli, Kelsey G Wheeler, M Ida Gobbini
Neural models of a distributed system for face perception implicate a network of regions in the ventral visual stream for recognition of identity. Here, we report a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) neural decoding study in humans that shows that this pathway culminates in the right inferior frontal cortex face area (rIFFA) with a representation of individual identities that has been disentangled from variable visual features in different images of the same person. At earlier stages in the pathway, processing begins in early visual cortex and the occipital face area with representations of head view that are invariant across identities, and proceeds to an intermediate level of representation in the fusiform face area in which identity is emerging but still entangled with head view...
November 23, 2016: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28011742/the-superior-temporal-sulcus-is-causally-connected-to-the-amygdala-a-combined-tbs-fmri-study
#10
David Pitcher, Shruti Japee, Lionel Rauth, Leslie G Ungerleider
: Non-human primate neuroanatomical studies have identified a cortical pathway from the superior temporal sulcus (STS) projecting into dorsal sub-regions of the amygdala, but whether this same pathway exists in humans is unknown. Here, we addressed this question by combining thetaburst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TBS) with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to test the prediction that the STS and amygdala are functionally connected during face perception. Human participants (N=17) were scanned, over two sessions, while viewing 3-second video clips of moving faces, bodies and objects...
December 23, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27989842/recognizing-approaching-walkers-neural-decoding-of-person-familiarity-in-cortical-areas-responsive-to-faces-bodies-and-biological-motion
#11
Carina A Hahn, Alice J O'Toole
In natural viewing environments, we recognize other people as they move through the world. Behavioral studies indicate that the face, body, and gait all contribute to recognition. We examined the neural basis of person recognition using a decoding approach aimed at discriminating the patterns of neural activity elicited in response to seeing visually familiar versus unfamiliar people in motion. Participants learned 30 identities by viewing multiple videos of the people in action. Recognition was tested inside a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanner using 8-second videos of 60 people (30 learned and 30 novel) approaching from a distance (~13 m)...
October 27, 2016: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27956263/functional-modulation-of-contralateral-bias-in-early-and-object-selective-areas-after-stroke-of-the-occipital-ventral-cortices
#12
Maren Praß, Cathleen Grimsen, Manfred Fahle
Object agnosia is a rare symptom, occurring mainly after bilateral damage of the ventral visual cortex. Most patients suffering from unilateral ventral lesions are clinically non-agnosic. Here, we studied the effect of unilateral occipito-temporal lesions on object categorization and its underlying neural correlates in visual areas. Thirteen non-agnosic stroke patients and twelve control subjects performed an event-related rapid object categorization task in the fMRI scanner where images were presented either to the left or to the right of a fixed point...
December 9, 2016: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27923928/visual-sampling-predicts-hippocampal-activity
#13
Zhong-Xu Liu, Kelly Shen, Rosanna K Olsen, Jennifer D Ryan
: Eye movements serve to accumulate information from the visual world, contributing to the formation of coherent memory representations that support cognition and behaviour. The hippocampus and the oculomotor network are well connected anatomically through an extensive set of polysynaptic pathways. However, the extent to which visual sampling behaviour is related to functional responses in the hippocampus during encoding has not been directly studied in human neuroimaging. In the current study, participants engaged in a face processing task while brain responses were recorded with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and eye movements were simultaneously monitored...
December 6, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27909005/repetition-suppression-and-memory-for-faces-is-reduced-in-adults-with-autism-spectrum-conditions
#14
Michael P Ewbank, Philip J Pell, Thomas E Powell, Elisabeth A H von dem Hagen, Simon Baron-Cohen, Andrew J Calder
Autism spectrum conditions (ASC) are associated with a number of atypicalities in face processing, including difficulties in face memory. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this difficulty are unclear. In neurotypical individuals, repeated presentation of the same face is associated with a reduction in activity, known as repetition suppression (RS), in the fusiform face area (FFA). However, to date, no studies have investigated RS to faces in individuals with ASC, or the relationship between RS and face memory...
November 30, 2016: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27843696/position-selectivity-in-face-sensitive-visual-cortex-to-facial-and-nonfacial-stimuli-an-fmri-study
#15
David F Nichols, Lisa R Betts, Hugh R Wilson
BACKGROUND: Evidence for position sensitivity in object-selective visual areas has been building. On one hand, most of the relevant studies have utilized stimuli for which the areas are optimally selective and examine small sections of cortex. On the other hand, visual field maps established with nonspecific stimuli have been found in increasingly large areas of visual cortex, though generally not in areas primarily responsive to faces. METHODS: fMRI was used to study the position sensitivity of the occipital face area (OFA) and the fusiform face area (FFA) to both standard rotating wedge retinotopic mapping stimuli and quadrant presentations of synthetic facial stimuli...
November 2016: Brain and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27810354/human-sensory-cortex-structure-and-top-down-controlling-brain-network-determine-individual-differences-in-perceptual-alternations
#16
Na Sang, Lijie Zhang, Lei Hao, Yongchao Wang, Xiaogang Wang, Fan Zhang, Hui Huang, Xin Hou, Yu Mao, Taiyong Bi, Jiang Qiu
Bistable perception is a type of subjective perception that spontaneously alternates between two perceptual interpretations of an ambiguous sensory input. Past functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have examined the activation patterns underlying bistable perception, yet the variability between individuals in the alternations is not well understood. Therefore, voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was introduced in this study to correlate the GM of the sensory cortex with the alternations of Rubin face-vase illusion in a large group of young adults...
January 1, 2017: Neuroscience Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27781139/mandarin-functional-mri-language-paradigms
#17
He Ci, Andre van Graan, Gloria Gonzálvez, Pamela Thompson, Andrea Hill, John S Duncan
OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to implement convenient, fast, and accurate Mandarin task paradigms for functional MRI, and to locate the Chinese language functional areas in frontal and temporal lobes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Nineteen healthy Chinese volunteers participated in this study, which utilized a block design with four language tasks: auditory naming (AN), picture naming (PN), verbal fluency-character (VFC), and verbal fluency-letter (VFL). All functional images were preprocessed by SPM 8, followed by first- and second-level analyses and lateralization index calculation...
October 2016: Brain and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27779618/a-studyforrest-extension-retinotopic-mapping-and-localization-of-higher-visual-areas
#18
Ayan Sengupta, Falko R Kaule, J Swaroop Guntupalli, Michael B Hoffmann, Christian Häusler, Jörg Stadler, Michael Hanke
The studyforrest (http://studyforrest.org) dataset is likely the largest neuroimaging dataset on natural language and story processing publicly available today. In this article, along with a companion publication, we present an update of this dataset that extends its scope to vision and multi-sensory research. 15 participants of the original cohort volunteered for a series of additional studies: a clinical examination of visual function, a standard retinotopic mapping procedure, and a localization of higher visual areas-such as the fusiform face area...
October 25, 2016: Scientific Data
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27756696/preferential-coding-of-eye-hand-motor-actions-in-the-human-ventral-occipito-temporal-cortex
#19
Annalisa Tosoni, Roberto Guidotti, Cosimo Del Gratta, Giorgia Committeri, Carlo Sestieri
The human ventral occipito-temporal cortex (OTC) contains areas specialized for particular perceptual/semantic categories, such as faces (fusiform face area, FFA) and places (parahippocampal place area, PPA). This organization has been interpreted as reflecting the visual structure of the world, i.e. perceptual similarity and/or eccentricity biases. However, recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have shown not only that regions of the OTC are modulated by non-visual, action-related object properties but also by motor planning and execution, although the functional role and specificity of this motor-related activity are still unclear...
December 2016: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27748031/functional-connectivity-differences-in-autism-during-face-and-car-recognition-underconnectivity-and-atypical-age-related-changes
#20
Andrew C Lynn, Aarthi Padmanabhan, Daniel Simmonds, William Foran, Michael N Hallquist, Beatriz Luna, Kirsten O'Hearn
Face recognition abilities improve between adolescence and adulthood over typical development (TD), but plateau in autism, leading to increasing face recognition deficits in autism later in life. Developmental differences between autism and TD may reflect changes between neural systems involved in the development of face encoding and recognition. Here, we focused on whole-brain connectivity with the fusiform face area (FFA), a well-established face-preferential brain region. Older children, adolescents, and adults with and without autism completed the Cambridge Face Memory Test, and a matched car memory test, during fMRI scanning...
October 16, 2016: Developmental Science
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