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Spinal dysraphism

S M Lee, J-E Cheon, Y H Choi, I-O Kim, W S Kim, H-H Cho, J Y Lee, K-C Wang
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: While limited dorsal myeloschisis is a distinctive form of spinal dysraphism, it may be confused with congenital dermal sinus. The aim of this study was to describe clinical and MR imaging findings of limited dorsal myeloschisis that can distinguish it from congenital dermal sinus. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed the clinical and MR imaging findings of 12 patients with limited dorsal myeloschisis and 10 patients with congenital dermal sinus...
October 20, 2016: AJNR. American Journal of Neuroradiology
Anand Pandey, Vipin Gupta, Shailendra P Singh, Vijendra Kumar, Rajesh Verma
A trophic ulcer is a pressure ulcer caused by external trauma to a part of the body that is compromised due to disease, vascular insufficiency, or loss of afferent nerve fibers. Spinal dysraphism (ie, neural tube defects [NTD]) such as meningomyelocele is a risk factor for developing these ulcers in adults and pediatric patients. Information regarding the occurrence of trophic ulcers in pediatric patients with NTD is lacking. A review of the English-language literature on skin/neuropathic ulcers in patients with NTDs, irrespective of study design, published between 1975 and 2014, was undertaken using the PubMed database...
December 2015: Ostomy/wound Management
Awder A Khazendar, Hemin M Hama Ameen, Nzar I Jabbar, Seerwan O Hasan, Talar S Ahmed, Alaa A Ali
BACKGROUND: Intradural extramedullary spinal teratoma (IEST) is a rare condition in adult patients with male predominance. It is commonly associated with spinal dysraphism, lumbar puncture and prior spinal surgeries. The study presents a 37-year-old male diagnosed with upper lumbar intradural extramedullary mature cystic teratoma without dysraphism or prior surgical interventions. CASE DESCRIPTION: Patient's symptoms included a lumbar backache which progressed to the toes, as well as the anterior region of both the thighs...
September 15, 2016: World Neurosurgery
Paul Clark, Laurence Davidson
A pseudotail is a very rare, dermal appendage arising from the lumbosacral region with an association with spinal dysraphism. We report a case of a pseudotail in a healthy newborn female with sonographic imaging of a tethered cord and dermal sinus tract with MRI and surgical correlation.
September 2016: Journal of Ultrasound
Usha D Nagaraj, Karin S Bierbrauer, Jose L Peiro, Beth M Kline-Fath
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to identify differences in findings between open and closed spinal dysraphisms seen on fetal MR images. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A single-institution retrospective analysis of fetal MR images for spinal dysraphism was performed. Postnatal images and clinical and operative reports were reviewed. RESULTS: Sixteen fetuses with postnatally confirmed closed spinal dysraphisms were included. Of these, 25% (4/16) had posterior fossa anomalies, 12...
September 9, 2016: AJR. American Journal of Roentgenology
Nishanth Sadashiva, Manish Beniwal, Dhaval Shukla, Dwarakanath Srinivas
A human tail or a caudal appendage is a rare condition with preconceived notions and stigmata. They could be either true tails or "pseudotails" based on their embryology. Clinically, they are considered as a marker of occult spinal dysraphism. We report two such cases with tethering of cord, one of which was associated with a lipomeningomyelocele. These patients are in need of meticulous evaluation and appropriate management.
April 2016: Journal of Pediatric Neurosciences
Francisco Funes Díaz, Verónica Gaete Pinto
UNLABELLED: Adolescents with complex diseases may have a higher frequency of risk behaviors than their healthy peers. AIM: To characterize risk behaviors in adolescents with complex chronic diseases. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Risk behaviors were assessed by means of a self-administered questionnaire designed for this purpose, in adolescents aged 10 to 19 years, who attended a pediatrics specialties clinic due to cystic fibrosis, congenital craniofacial anomalies, liver transplantation, kidney transplantation and spinal dysraphism...
June 2016: Revista Médica de Chile
Natalie S Valeur, Ramesh S Iyer, Gisele E Ishak
Cervical dysraphism is rare, and the 3 recognized subtypes manifest as cystic, skin-covered masses. To our knowledge, no case of cervical lipomyelocele has been reported in the literature so far. We present a case of surgically and pathologically confirmed cervical lipomyelocele in a patient with spondylocostal dysostosis and multiple other congenital anomalies and a brief review of the literature. In this case, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrates fat extension into a dysraphic cervical spinal canal, allowing for preoperative diagnosis...
September 2016: Radiology case reports
Peyton Wilson, Erin Hayes, Andrew Barber, Jacob Lohr
Sacral dimples are common physical examination findings among newborns and are rarely associated with spinal dysraphism. Screening ultrasonography for simple sacral dimples in the absence of other physical findings leads to unnecessary health care costs and undue stress on families. This study was a retrospective chart review of infants with a sacral dimple on examination who underwent spinal ultrasonography in the first week of life. The documented indication for ultrasonography was compared to standard guidelines...
October 2016: Clinical Pediatrics
Anna Morandi, Irene Borzani, Francesco Macchini, Giulia Brisighelli, Dario Consonni, Ernesto Leva
BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: To assess the anatomical results after posterior sagittal anorectoplasty (PSARP) by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and to evaluate the correlation of these findings with clinical outcomes. METHODS: Patients followed-up at our center after PSARP, being at least 6year old, with neither evidence of sacral abnormalities nor spinal dysraphisms were prospectively included. Complex ARMs were excluded. MRI was performed on a 1.5T unit. T1- and T2-weighted sequences were acquired, in orthogonal planes, according to the anal canal orientation...
November 2016: Journal of Pediatric Surgery
C Corbett Wilkinson, Arianne J Boylan
INTRODUCTION: The most commonly used classification system for caudal appendages (aka human tails) dates from the 1980s and classifies appendages (tails) as either true tails or pseudotails. Advances in neuroimaging since the 1980s, however, as well as an ever-increasing number of reported cases, have made this system outdated. Sacrococcygeal eversion is a condition in which the distal sacral and coccygeal vertebrae are curved in a retroverted rather than anteverted direction. It can give rise to one type of caudal appendage...
August 6, 2016: Child's Nervous System: ChNS: Official Journal of the International Society for Pediatric Neurosurgery
Khadija Sellami, Hend Chaabane, Hela Fourati, Abderrahmen Masmoudi, Zeineb Mnif, Madiha Mseddi, Hamida Turki
Dermoid cysts of the central nervous system can cause devastating complications because of the mass effect of meningitis due to sinus tract. We report the case of a 5-month-old girl who presented with a crusted lesion of the occipital region of the scalp. Clinical examination noted skin abnormalities suggestive of occult dysraphism. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was recommended, however, 40 days after this evaluation, and before the MRI could be performed, the girl presented with neurologic complications...
September 2016: Pediatric Dermatology
Lena Naffaa, Neville Irani, Charbel Saade, Gayathi Sreedher
Congenital malformations of the lumbosacral spine include spinal dysraphism and caudal anomalies. Most often, these malformations are discovered prenatally or in early infancy, but some are not diagnosed until late childhood or adulthood. The purpose of this pictorial review is to illustrate the multi-modality imaging characteristics in these complex anomalies and to provide a systematic radiological approach aiming at improving diagnostic accuracy.
July 28, 2016: Journal of Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology
Soichiro Takamiya, Kazutoshi Hida, Shunsuke Yano, Toru Sasamori, Toshitaka Seki, Hisatoshi Saito
Spinal lipomas are rare, accounting for less than 1% of all spinal tumors. Most are associated with spinal dysraphism. Spinal lipomas without spinal dysraphism are uncommon;they are typically subpial tumors. Some tumors are located both inside and outside the dura mater (so-called "dumbbell-type"). Herein, we report a patient with a dumbbell-type thoracic spinal lipoma. A man in his 50's complained of progressive gait disturbance, dysesthesia in his left leg, and hyperesthesia in his right leg. His symptoms were worsened by exercise...
June 2016: No Shinkei Geka. Neurological Surgery
Laxminadh Sivaraju, Sumit Thakar, Nandita Ghosal, Alangar S Hegde
The occurrence of epidermoids within the spinal canal is uncommon. Most of the reported spinal epidermoids (SEs) have been described in the thoracic or lumbar regions. They occur either following trauma or in the setting of coexistent spinal dysraphism. The authors describe an unusual case of a 28-year-old lady who presented with long-standing back pain and urinary incontinence. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of her spine demonstrated a sacral SE without any coexistent spinal dysraphism. The diagnosis of an epidermoid was confirmed by histopathological examination following laminectomy and excision...
April 2016: Journal of Craniovertebral Junction and Spine
JiaDe Yu, Mohit Maheshwari, Andrew B Foy, Casey M Calkins, Beth A Drolet
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
August 2016: Journal of Pediatrics
I Pérez-López, A Martinez-López, G Blasco-Morente, R Ruiz-Villaverde
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 18, 2016: Actas Dermo-sifiliográficas
Juliette Hascoet, Andrea Manunta, Charlène Brochard, Alexis Arnaud, Mireille Damphousse, Hélène Menard, Jacques Kerdraon, Hubert Journel, Isabelle Bonan, Sylvie Odent, Benjamin Fremond, Laurent Siproudhis, Xavier Gamé, Benoit Peyronnet
CONTEXT: Bladder management in spina bifida patients relies on clean intermittent catheterization and oral antimuscarinics with a significant failure rate. The efficacy of intradetrusor injections of botulinum toxin has been confirmed in patients with spinal cord injury or multiple sclerosis but not in patients with myelomeningocele. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a systematic review of current evidence regarding the efficacy of intra-detrusor injections of Botulinum Toxin A (BTX-A) in spina bifida patients with neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) refractory to antimuscarinics...
May 17, 2016: Neurourology and Urodynamics
Stéphanie Friszer, Ferdinand Dhombres, Baptiste Morel, Michel Zerah, Jean-Marie Jouannic, Catherine Garel
OBJECTIVE: To determine the ultrasonographic characteristics of limited dorsal myeloschisis (LDM) at prenatal ultrasound (US) and to highlight the main features that may help differentiate LDM and myelomeningocele (MMC). METHODS: In a tertiary reference center in fetal medicine, we prospectively collected the medical data and ultrasonographic characteristics of all patients referred for in utero prenatal repair of MMC between November 1, 2013 and April 30, 2015...
May 5, 2016: Fetal Diagnosis and Therapy
Gerald F Tuite, Ethan G Polsky, Yves Homsy, Margaret A Reilly, Carolyn M Carey, S Parrish Winesett, Luis F Rodriguez, Bruce B Storrs, Sarah J Gaskill, Lisa L Tetreault, Denise G Martinez, Ernest K Amankwah
OBJECTIVE Xiao et al. and other investigators have studied an intradural somatic-to-autonomic (e.g., L-5 to S3-4) nerve transfer as a method to create a reflex arc to allow bladder emptying in response to cutaneous stimulation (the Xiao procedure). In previous clinical studies of patients with spinal dysraphism who underwent the Xiao procedure, high success rates (70%-85%) were reported for the establishment of a "skin-CNS-bladder" reflex arc that allows spontaneous, controlled voiding in children with neurogenic bladder dysfunction...
August 2016: Journal of Neurosurgery. Pediatrics
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