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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875357/optimal-timing-of-endoscopic-retrograde-cholangiopancreatography-in-acute-cholangitis
#1
Linda A Hou, Loren Laine, Nima Motamedi, Ara Sahakian, Christianne Lane, James Buxbaum
OBJECTIVES: Acute cholangitis mandates resuscitation, antibiotic therapy, and biliary decompression. Our aim was to define the optimal timing of endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for patients with acute cholangitis. METHODS: Clinical data on all cases of cholangitis managed by ERCP were prospectively collected from September 2010 to July 2013. The clinical impact of the time to ERCP, defined as the time from presentation in the emergency department to the commencement of the ERCP, was determined...
November 21, 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27826633/air-embolisms-in-pulmonary-artery-right-atrium-and-portal-vein-an-unusual-case-of-decompression-sickness
#2
Cristina Murcia-Gubianas, Claudia Vera Ching, Josep-Maria Sirvent
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 8, 2016: Intensive Care Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27795792/aseptic-necrosis-of-the-femoral-head-after-pregnancy-a-case-report
#3
Kawtar Nassar, Wafae Rachidi, Saadia Janani, Ouafa Mkinsi
A documented case of beginning aseptic necrosis of the femoral head associated with pregnancy together with a review of the literature about this rare complication of pregnancy is presented. The known risk factors of osteonecrosis are; steroid use, alcoholism, organ transplantation, especially after kidney transplant or bone marrow transplantation bone, systemic lupus erythematosus, dyslipidemia especially hypertriglyceridemia, dysbaric decompression sickness, drepanocytosis and Gaucher's disease. Among the less established factors, we mention procoagulations abnormalities, HIV infection, chemotherapy...
2016: Pan African Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27748209/hyperbaric-oxygen-therapy-for-sudden-sensorineural-hearing-loss-in-divers
#4
A W Van Der Wal, P J A M Van Ooij, J A De Ru
OBJECTIVE: Sudden sensorineural hearing loss in divers may be caused by either inner-ear barotrauma or inner-ear decompression sickness. There is no consensus on the best treatment option. This study aimed to evaluate the therapeutic value of hyperbaric oxygen therapy for sudden sensorineural hearing loss in divers. METHOD: A literature review and three cases of divers with sudden sensorineural hearing loss treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy are presented. RESULTS: Hyperbaric oxygen therapy resulted in hearing improvement in 80 per cent of patients: 39 per cent had hearing improvement and 41 per cent had full recovery...
November 2016: Journal of Laryngology and Otology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27727851/clinical-profile-of-decompression-sickness-in-deep-sea-divers
#5
Ajinkya Borhade, S Arulrhaj, B Kannan, Rakesh Sonavane
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27634609/initial-severity-scoring-and-residual-deficit-in-scuba-divers-with-inner-ear-decompression-sickness
#6
Emmanuel Gempp, Pierre Louge, Sébastien de Maistre, Jean-Baptiste Morvan, Nicolas Vallée, Jean-Eric Blatteau
BACKGROUND: Inner ear decompression sickness (IEDCS) in scuba diving results in residual vestibulocochlear deficits with a potential impact on health-related quality of life. The aim of this study was to determine the predictive factors for poor clinical recovery and to try to establish a prognostic score on initial physical examination. METHODS: The medical records of injured divers with IEDCS treated in our facility between 2009 and 2014 were retrospectively analyzed...
August 2016: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27633737/gut-fermentation-seems-to-promote-decompression-sickness-in-humans
#7
Sébastien de Maistre, Nicolas Vallée, Emmanuel Gempp, Pierre Louge, Claude H B Duchamp, Jean-Eric Blatteau
Introduction Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS) that can result in neurological disorders. In experimental dives using hydrogen as the diluent gas, decreasing the body's H2 burden by inoculating hydrogen-metabolizing microbes into the gut reduces the risk of DCS. In contrast, we have shown that gut bacterial fermentation in rats on a standard diet promotes DCS through endogenous hydrogen production. So we set out to test these experimental results in humans. Materials and methods 39 divers admitted into our hyperbaric center with neurological DCS (Affected Divers) were compared with 39 healthy divers (Unaffected Divers)...
September 15, 2016: Journal of Applied Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27616622/to-close-or-not-to-close-contemporary-indications-for-patent-foramen-ovale-closure
#8
Lucas S Zier, Horst Sievert, Vaikom S Mahadevan
INTRODUCTION: Patent foramen ovale (PFO) is a common congenital cardiac abnormality and that has been associated with several disease processes including transient ischemic attacks (TIA), stroke, migraine headaches with aura, decompression sickness, platypnea-orthodeoxia syndrome, and shunt induced cyanosis. Controversy exists regarding closure of PFO as a therapeutic treatment modality for these disease processes. This review addresses the contemporary clinical indications for PFO closure...
September 10, 2016: Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27608154/yo-yo-diving-and-risk-of-decompression-sickness-in-trainee-military-divers
#9
Emmanuel Gempp, Christophe Pény
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27562522/updating-a-gas-dynamics-model-using-estimates-for-california-sea-lions-zalophus-californianus
#10
Matthew R Hodanbosi, Blair Sterba-Boatwright, Andreas Fahlman
Theoretical models are used to predict how breath-hold diving vertebrates manage O2, CO2, and N2 while underwater. One recent gas dynamics model used available lung and tracheal compliance data from various species. As variation in respiratory compliance significantly affects alveolar compression and pulmonary shunt, the current study objective was to evaluate changes in model output when using species-specific parameters from California sea lions (Zalophus californianus). We explored the effects of lung and dead space compliance on the uptake of N2, O2, and CO2 in various tissues during a series of hypothetical dives...
August 22, 2016: Respiratory Physiology & Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27493634/bubbles-quantified-in-vivo-by-ultrasound-relates-to-amount-of-gas-detected-post-mortem-in-rabbits-decompressed-from-high-pressure
#11
Yara Bernaldo de Quirós, Andreas Møllerløkken, Marianne B Havnes, Alf O Brubakk, Oscar González-Díaz, Antonio Fernández
The pathophysiological mechanism of decompression sickness is not fully understood but there is evidence that it can be caused by intravascular and autochthonous bubbles. Doppler ultrasound at a given circulatory location is used to detect and quantify the presence of intravascular gas bubbles as an indicator of decompression stress. In this manuscript we studied the relationship between presence and quantity of gas bubbles by echosonography of the pulmonary artery of anesthetized, air-breathing New Zealand White rabbits that were compressed and decompressed...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27450603/inner-ear-barotrauma-after-underwater-pool-competency-training-without-the-use-of-compressed-air-case-and-review
#12
Sean McIntire, Lee Boujie
Inner ear barotrauma can occur when the gas-filled chambers of the ear have difficulty equalizing pressure with the outside environment after changes in ambient pressure. This can transpire even with small pressure changes. Hypobaric or hyperbaric environments can place significant stress on the structures of the middle and inner ear. If methods to equalize pressure between the middle ear and other connected gas-filled spaces (i.e., Valsalva maneuver) are unsuccessful, middle ear overpressurization can occur...
2016: Journal of Special Operations Medicine: a Peer Reviewed Journal for SOF Medical Professionals
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27416694/delayed-hepatobiliary-injury-in-a-decompression-sickness-patient-after-scuba-diving-case-report
#13
Hee Duck Kim, Sang Hwan Lee, Huisu Eom, Young Joong Kang
We report here the first case of liver injury in a 51-year-old man following a dive to a depth of 40 meters. He presented with typical neurological symptoms affecting the lower limbs. Five days later, he experienced delayed abdominal pain, followed by rapidly progressive liver and adjacent organ injury due to air emboli in the intrahepatic portal vein. He received supportive care and hyperbaric therapy with a U.S. Navy Treatment Table 6 and recovered. Decompression sickness is a disease of protean manifestations...
May 2016: Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine: Journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27368044/pathophysiological-and-diagnostic-implications-of-cardiac-biomarkers-and-antidiuretic-hormone-release-in-distinguishing-immersion-pulmonary-edema-from-decompression-sickness
#14
Pierre Louge, Mathieu Coulange, Frederic Beneton, Emmanuel Gempp, Olivier Le Pennetier, Maxime Algoud, Lorene Dubourg, Pierre Naibo, Marion Marlinge, Pierre Michelet, Donato Vairo, Nathalie Kipson, François Kerbaul, Yves Jammes, Ian M Jones, Jean-Guillaume Steinberg, Jean Ruf, Régis Guieu, Alain Boussuges, Emmanuel Fenouillet
Immersion pulmonary edema (IPE) is a misdiagnosed environmental illness caused by water immersion, cold, and exertion. IPE occurs typically during SCUBA diving, snorkeling, and swimming. IPE is sometimes associated with myocardial injury and/or loss of consciousness in water, which may be fatal. IPE is thought to involve hemodynamic and cardiovascular disturbances, but its pathophysiology remains largely unclear, which makes IPE prevention difficult. This observational study aimed to document IPE pathogenesis and improve diagnostic reliability, including distinguishing in some conditions IPE from decompression sickness (DCS), another diving-related disorder...
June 2016: Medicine (Baltimore)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27334999/inner-ear-decompression-sickness-in-nine-trimix-recreational-divers
#15
Silvia Guenzani, Diego Mereu, Mark Messersmith, Diego Olivari, Mario Arena, Andrea Spanò
INTRODUCTION: Recreational technical diving, including the use of helium-based mixes (trimix) and the experimentation of new decompression algorithms, has become increasingly popular. Inner-ear decompression sickness (DCS) can occur as an isolated clinical entity or as part of a multi-organ presentation in this population. Physiological characteristics of the inner ear make it selectively vulnerable to DCS. The inner ear has a slower gas washout than the brain thus potentially making it more vulnerable to deleterious effects of any bubbles that cross a persistent foramen ovale (PFO) and enter the basilar artery, whilst the inner ear remains supersaturated but the brain does not...
June 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27334993/perilymphatic-fistula-after-underwater-diving-a-series-of-11-cases
#16
Jean-Baptiste Morvan, Emmanuel Gempp, Damien Rivière, Pierre Louge, Nicolas Vallee, Pierre Verdalle
INTRODUCTION: Onset of cochleovestibular symptoms (hearing loss, dizziness or instability, tinnitus) after a dive (scuba or breath-hold diving) warrants emergency transfer to an otology department. One priority is to investigate the possibility of the development of decompression sickness with a view to hyperbaric oxygen treatment of bubble-induced inner-ear damage. If this injury is ruled out, inner-ear barotrauma should be considered together with its underlying specific injury pattern, perilymphatic fistula...
June 2016: Diving and Hyperbaric Medicine: the Journal of the South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27265987/echocardiographic-evaluation-of-intracardiac-venous-gas-emboli-following-in-water-recompression
#17
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
J Dituri, R Sadler, F Siddiqi, C Sadler, N Javeed, H Annis, H Whelan
Decompression sickness is a potentially fatal illness. Optimal treatment is dry recompression with hyperbaric oxygen. In-water recompression (IWR) offers expedited treatment but has insufficient evidence to recommend it as a treatment option. This trial compares IWR to standard surface oxygen treatment using 2D echocardiography as the semi-quantitative measurement for inert gas loading. Divers were randomly assigned to either IWR or normobaric oxygen (NBO2). A provocative dive profile to 33.5 meters for 25 minutes was used to stimulate bubble formation...
March 2016: Undersea & Hyperbaric Medicine: Journal of the Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society, Inc
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27246598/can-asthmatic-subjects-dive
#18
Yochai Adir, Alfred A Bove
Recreational diving with self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) has grown in popularity. Asthma is a common disease with a similar prevalence in divers as in the general population. Due to theoretical concern about an increased risk for pulmonary barotrauma and decompression sickness in asthmatic divers, in the past the approach to asthmatic diver candidates was very conservative, with scuba disallowed. However, experience in the field and data in the current literature do not support this dogmatic approach...
June 2016: European Respiratory Review: An Official Journal of the European Respiratory Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27242609/correlation-between-patent-foramen-ovale-cerebral-lesions-and-neuropsychometric-testing-in-experienced-sports-divers-does-diving-damage-the-brain
#19
Costantino Balestra, Peter Germonpré
SCUBA diving exposes divers to decompression sickness (DCS). There has been considerable debate whether divers with a Patent Foramen Ovale of the heart have a higher risk of DCS because of the possible right-to-left shunt of venous decompression bubbles into the arterial circulation. Symptomatic neurological DCS has been shown to cause permanent damage to brain and spinal cord tissue; it has been suggested that divers with PFO may be at higher risk of developing subclinical brain lesions because of repeated asymptomatic embolization of decompression-induced nitrogen bubbles...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27234535/differentiation-at-necropsy-between-in-vivo-gas-embolism-and-putrefaction-using-a-gas-score
#20
Yara Bernaldo de Quirós, Pedro Saavedra, Andreas Møllerløkken, Alf O Brubakk, Arve Jørgensen, Oscar González-Díaz, Jose L Martín-Barrasa, Antonio Fernández
Gas bubble lesions consistent with decompression sickness in marine mammals were described for the first time in beaked whales stranded in temporal and spatial association with military exercises. Putrefaction gas is a post-mortem artifact, which hinders the interpretation of gas found at necropsy. Gas analyses have been proven to help differentiating putrefaction gases from gases formed after hyperbaric exposures. Unfortunately, chemical analysis cannot always be performed. Post-mortem computed tomography is used to study gas collections, but many different logistical obstacles and obvious challenges, like the size of the animal or the transport of the animal from the stranding location to the scanner, limit its use in stranded marine mammals...
June 2016: Research in Veterinary Science
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