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Dance training

Ummuhan Isoglu-Alkac, M Numan Ermutlu, Gökçer Eskikurt, İlker Yücesir, Sernaz Demirel Temel, Tan Temel
Physical exercise and the training effects of repeated practice of skills over an extended period of time may have additive effects on brain networks and functions. Various motor skills and attentional styles can be developed by athletes engaged in different sports. In this study, the effects of fast ball sports and dance training on attention were investigated by event related potentials (ERP). ERP were recorded in auditory and visual tasks in professional dancer, professional fast ball sports athlete (FBSA) and healthy control volunteer groups consisting of twelve subjects each...
April 2018: Cognitive Neurodynamics
Elizabeth A Ashley, Judith Recht, Arlene Chua, David Dance, Mehul Dhorda, Nigel V Thomas, Nisha Ranganathan, Paul Turner, Philippe J Guerin, Nicholas J White, Nicholas P Day
Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) shoulder the bulk of the global burden of infectious diseases and drug resistance. We searched for supranational networks performing antimicrobial resistance (AMR) surveillance in LMICs and assessed their organization, methodology, impacts and challenges. Since 2000, 72 supranational networks for AMR surveillance in bacteria, fungi, HIV, TB and malaria have been created that have involved LMICs, of which 34 are ongoing. The median (range) duration of the networks was 6 years (1-70) and the number of LMICs included was 8 (1-67)...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy
Sarah Beck, Matthew A Wyon, Emma Redding
Beck, S, Wyon, MA, and Redding, E. Changes in energy demand of dance activity and cardiorespiratory fitness during 1 year of vocational contemporary dance training. J Strength Cond Res 32(3): 841-848, 2018-Previous literature has demonstrated that the intensity of dance class as well as its discontinuous nature is not sufficient to elicit an aerobic training response and that the aerobic capacity of dancers is relatively low. These findings have raised questions on the suitability of training, through class and rehearsal, as adequate preparation for the physical demands of performance and a sustained, successful career in dance...
March 2018: Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research
Catherine Turner, Sarah Crow, Thomas Crowther, Brittany Keating, Trenton Saupan, Jason Pyfer, Kimberly Vialpando, Szu-Ping Lee
OBJECTIVES: To investigate the effects of dance experience and movement instruction on lower extremity kinematics and muscle activation during a landing task. DESIGN: Cross-sectional case control. SETTING: Laboratory setting. PARTICIPANTS: 27 female subjects (age 18-25) in 2 groups: dancers (n = 12) and non-dancers (n = 15). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Lower extremity biomechanics during drop landing were analyzed...
December 23, 2017: Physical Therapy in Sport
Ivonne Rudolph, Thorsten Schmidt, Tobias Wozniak, Thomas Kubin, Dana Ruetters, Jutta Huebner
BACKGROUND: Physical activity has positive effects on cancer patients. Dancing addresses diverse bio-psycho-social aspects. Our aim was to assess the evidence on ballroom dancing and to develop the setting for a pilot project. METHODS: We performed a systematic review, extracted the data and designed a pilot training based on standard curricula. We included cancer patients during or after therapy. Training duration was 90 min with one regular pause and individual pauses as needed...
February 8, 2018: Journal of Cancer Research and Clinical Oncology
Amanda Greene, Andrea Lasner, Rajwinder Deu, Seth Oliphant, Kenneth Johnson
Reliable methods of measuring turnout in dancers and comparing active turnout (used in class) with functional (uncompensated) turnout are needed. Authors have suggested measurement techniques but there is no clinically useful, easily reproducible technique with established inter-rater and intra-rater reliability. We adapted a technique based on previous research, which is easily reproducible. We hypothesized excellent inter-rater and intra-rater reliability between experienced physical therapists (PTs) and a briefly trained faculty member from a university's department of dance...
February 2, 2018: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
Yi-Huang Su, Peter E Keller
Motor simulation has been implicated in how musicians anticipate the rhythm of another musician's action to achieve interpersonal synchronization. Here, we investigated whether similar mechanisms govern a related form of rhythmic action: dance. We examined (1) whether synchronization with visual dance stimuli was influenced by movement agency, (2) whether music training modulated simulation efficiency, and (3) what cues were relevant for simulating the dance rhythm. Participants were first recorded dancing the basic Charleston steps paced by a metronome, and later in a synchronization task they tapped to the rhythm of their own point-light dance stimuli, stimuli of another physically matched participant or one matched in movement kinematics, and a quantitative average across individuals...
January 29, 2018: Psychological Research
Vladimir Berezutsky
The literature review comprises information about application of kinesio taping in prevention of professional dancers' injuries. The relevance of the study is determined by frequent dance related and overuse injuries and lack of organized information about this issue. The purpose of the study is to assess the impact of kinesio taping on the musculoskeletal system of dancers basing on the scientific research data of the years 2015-2017. The analysis revealed that kinesio taping can effectively reduce muscle spasms, rebuild muscle strength of the injured extremity, improve static and dynamic balance and ease the pain, due to its ability to improve the proprioception of the joints and regulate muscle tone...
January 26, 2018: International Journal of Occupational Safety and Ergonomics: JOSE
Léa A S Chauvigné, Michel Belyk, Steven Brown
Many forms of joint action involve physical coupling between the participants, such as when moving a sofa together or dancing a tango. We report the results of a novel two-person functional MRI study in which trained couple dancers engaged in bimanual contact with an experimenter standing next to the bore of the magnet, and in which the two alternated between being the leader and the follower of joint improvised movements. Leading showed a general pattern of self-orientation, being associated with brain areas involved in motor planning, navigation, sequencing, action monitoring, and error correction...
2018: PloS One
Anna Streber, Karim Abu-Omar, Christian Hentschke, Alfred Rütten
Prevention of dementia is a public health priority. Physical activity (PA) can reduce the risk of dementia, but the majority of people remain sedentary. We conducted a multicenter controlled study with older adults (60+ years). We hypothesized that an evidence-based PA intervention - GEhen, Spielen und Tanzen Als Lebenslange Tätigkeiten - kompakt [walking, playing and dancing as lifelong activities-compact] (GESTALT-kompakt) - would lead to significantly larger improvements in PA levels (step counts/Fitbit Zip™), cognitive functions (DemTect) and social activities (Social Activity Log), compared to an active control group...
2017: Clinical Interventions in Aging
Nicolò F Bernardi, Antoine Bellemare-Pepin, Isabelle Peretz
Dancing emphasizes the motor expression of emotional experiences. The bodily expression of emotions can modulate the subjective experience of emotions, as when adopting emotion-specific postures and faces. Thus, dancing potentially offers a ground for emotional coping through emotional enhancement and regulation. Here we investigated the emotional responses to music in individuals without any prior dance training while they either freely danced or refrained from movement. Participants were also tested while imitating their own dance movements but in the absence of music as a control condition...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Sarah J Kenny, Luz Palacios-Derflingher, Jackie L Whittaker, Carolyn A Emery
Study Design Cohort study. Background Multiple operational definitions of injury exist in dance research. The influence that these different injury definitions have on epidemiological estimations of injury burden among dancers warrants investigation. Objective To describe the influence of injury definition on injury prevalence, incidence, and severity in preprofessional ballet and contemporary dancers. Methods Dancers registered in full-time preprofessional ballet (n = 85; 77 female; median age, 15 years; range, 11-19 years) and contemporary (n = 60; 58 female; median age, 19 years; range, 17-30 years) training completed weekly online questionnaires (modified Oslo Sports Trauma Research Centre questionnaire on health problems) using 3 injury definitions: (1) time loss (unable to complete 1 or more classes/rehearsals/performances for 1 or more days beyond onset), (2) medical attention, and (3) any complaint...
March 2018: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy
Fernando Wario, Benjamin Wild, Raúl Rojas, Tim Landgraf
The waggle dance is one of the most popular examples of animal communication. Forager bees direct their nestmates to profitable resources via a complex motor display. Essentially, the dance encodes the polar coordinates to the resource in the field. Unemployed foragers follow the dancer's movements and then search for the advertised spots in the field. Throughout the last decades, biologists have employed different techniques to measure key characteristics of the waggle dance and decode the information it conveys...
2017: PloS One
Agnieszka Z Burzynska, Karolina Finc, Brittany K Taylor, Anya M Knecht, Arthur F Kramer
Dance - as a ritual, therapy, and leisure activity - has been known for thousands of years. Today, dance is increasingly used as therapy for cognitive and neurological disorders such as dementia and Parkinson's disease. Surprisingly, the effects of dance training on the healthy young brain are not well understood despite the necessity of such information for planning successful clinical interventions. Therefore, this study examined actively performing, expert-level trained college students as a model of long-term exposure to dance training...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Songee Jung, Yoshiro Okubo, Yosuke Osuka, Satoshi Seino, Joonsung Park, Hosung Nho, Kiyoji Tanaka
AIM: We aimed to compare the level of physical function (PF) and habitual exercise between older Japanese and Korean adults. METHODS: A comparative study was carried out on 1069 community-dwelling older Japanese and Korean adults (mean age 73.9 ± 5.2 years). The participants were asked to complete a self-reported questionnaire regarding habitual exercise and covariates. PF age, a composite measure of PF, was derived from the 12 items, using principal component analysis...
December 7, 2017: Geriatrics & Gerontology International
Ann Van de Winckel, Yu-Ting Tseng, Daniel Chantigian, Kaitlyn Lorant, Zinat Zarandi, Jeffrey Buchanan, Thomas A Zeffiro, Mia Larson, Becky Olson-Kellogg, Jürgen Konczak, Manda L Keller-Ross
Perception of limb and body positions is known as proprioception. Sensory feedback, especially from proprioceptive receptors, is essential for motor control. Aging is associated with a decline in position sense at proximal joints, but there is inconclusive evidence of distal joints being equally affected by aging. In addition, there is initial evidence that physical activity attenuates age-related decline in proprioception. Our objectives were, first, to establish wrist proprioceptive acuity in a large group of seniors and compare their perception to young adults, and second, to determine if specific types of training or regular physical activity are associated with preserved wrist proprioception...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Maria Guadalupe Soares Amorim, Maurício Dias de Oliveira, Daiane Santos Soares, Leandro da Silva Borges, Alexandre Dermargos, Elaine Hatanaka
The aim of this study was to examine the effects of exergaming on the cardiovascular risk factors and adipokine levels of women engaged in the music video game Just Dance using the Xbox 360 Kinect console. Triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, FFA, CRP, TNF-α, Il-1β, IL-6, leptin, and resistin were measured in sedentary women before and 1 month after the practice of exergaming. We also evaluated anthropometric parameters. Our results indicate that total serum cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL were reduced by 64, 29, and 12%, respectively...
November 30, 2017: Journal of Physiological Sciences: JPS
Kristen L Sowalsky, Jill Sonke, Lori J P Altmann, Leonardo Almeida, Chris J Hass
OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to measure the effects of a dance training program on subjective and objective balance and gait measures in a person with Parkinson's disease. DESIGN AND SETTING: The participant was measured via clinical scales and biomechanical balance and gait analyses pre- and post-16 weeks of dance participation at the University Center for Arts in Medicine. The dance program consisted of 75 minute sessions three days a week. RESULTS: Improved clinical scales included the Schwab and England scale (+10%), falls efficacy scale (-11 points), six-minute walk (+15...
November 2017: Explore: the Journal of Science and Healing
Emily Junck, Megan Richardson, Faye Dilgen, Marijeanne Liederbach
An injury that causes a dancer to take time away from training or performance can be career ending, and thus it is important for dancers to have accurate expectations when considering treatment options. Thus far, few studies have reported functional outcomes after injury in dancers, which may be different than for the general athletic population. Therefore, our study sought to determine functional outcomes in dancers after operative and non-operative treatment for common dance injuries. Our outcome measures included a subjective assessment of the degree to which a dancer had returned to his or her previous level of dance, the SF-12 survey, and the WHO functional outcome scale modified for dance...
December 15, 2017: Journal of Dance Medicine & Science
Paige E Rice, Herman van Werkhoven, Denzel J Dejournette, Reed D Gurchiek, John W Mackall, Jeffrey M McBride
Dance involves a high volume of aesthetic, stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) actions, which may cause unique adaptations to performance. The strength dancers possess to withstand such frequency of SSCs remains elusive. The extensive training that dancers experience from a young age, however, yields anatomical and strength development that may contrast with that of untrained individuals. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate differences in musculo-articular stiffness and maximal isometric plantar flexion and knee extension force between dancers and untrained individuals...
December 15, 2017: Journal of Dance Medicine & Science
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