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CAR T-Cells

Paulina J Paszkiewicz, Simon P Fräßle, Shivani Srivastava, Daniel Sommermeyer, Michael Hudecek, Ingo Drexler, Michel Sadelain, Lingfeng Liu, Michael C Jensen, Stanley R Riddell, Dirk H Busch
The adoptive transfer of T cells that have been genetically modified to express a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is effective for treating human B cell malignancies. However, the persistence of functional CD19 CAR T cells causes sustained depletion of endogenous CD19+ B cells and hypogammaglobulinemia. Thus, there is a need for a mechanism to ablate transferred T cells after tumor eradication is complete to allow recovery of normal B cells. Previously, we developed a truncated version of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRt) that is coexpressed with the CAR on the T cell surface...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Clinical Investigation
Linan Wang, Ning Ma, Sachiko Okamoto, Yasunori Amaishi, Eiichi Sato, Naohiro Seo, Junichi Mineno, Kazutoh Takesako, Takuma Kato, Hiroshi Shiku
Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cell surface antigen highly expressed in various cancer cell types and in healthy tissues. It has the potential to be a target for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell therapy; however, the safety of this approach in terms of on-target/off-tumor effects needs to be determined. To address this issue in a clinically relevant model, we used a mouse model in which the T cells expressing CEA-specific CAR were transferred into tumor-bearing CEA-transgenic (Tg) mice that physiologically expressed CEA as a self-antigen...
2016: Oncoimmunology
Mark W Lowdell, Amy Thomas
Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) represent the current pinnacle of 'patient-specific medicines' and will change the nature of medicine in the near future. They fall into three categories; somatic cell-therapy products, gene therapy products and cells or tissues for regenerative medicine, which are termed 'tissue engineered' products. The term also incorporates 'combination products' where a human cell or tissue is combined with a medical device. Plainly, many of these new medicines share similarities with conventional haematological stem cell transplant products and donor lymphocyte infusions as well as solid organ grafts and yet ATMPs are regulated as medicines and their development has remained predominantly in academic settings and within specialist centres...
October 17, 2016: British Journal of Haematology
Noelle V Frey, David L Porter
Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are engineered molecules that can be introduced into T cells to enable them to target specific tumor antigens. CAR T cells targeting CD19 have shown promise in patients with relapsed and refractory B-cell neoplasms, including those with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Notably, durable responses have been observed in patients who had not undergone consolidative stem cell transplant, a finding that correlates with reports of T-cell persistence and B-cell aplasia in studies of anti-CD19 treatment in vivo...
October 15, 2016: Oncology (Williston Park, NY)
Daniel H Li, James B Whitmore, Wentian Guo, Yuan Ji
Recent trials of adoptive cell therapy (ACT), such as the chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cells therapy, have demonstrated promising therapeutic effects for cancer patients. A main issue in the product development is to decide appropriate dose of ACT. Traditional phase 1 trial designs for cytotoxic agents explicitly assume that toxicity increases monotonically with dose levels and implicitly assume the same for efficacy to justify dose escalation. ACT usually induces rapid responses, and the monotonic dose-response assumption is unlikely to hold due to its immunobiological activities...
October 14, 2016: Clinical Cancer Research: An Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Emili Montserrat, Tycho Bauman, Julio Delgado
Medicine has been 'personalized' (i.e. centred in persons) since its foundation. Recently, however, the term 'personalized medicine' (or, better, 'precision medicine') has been introduced to define 'a form of medicine that uses information about a person's genes, proteins, and environment to prevent, diagnose, and treat disease'. This concept has gained momentum thanks to next-generation-sequencing (NGS) techniques that allow identification of molecular characteristics unique to the patient and to the tumour...
March 2016: Best Practice & Research. Clinical Haematology
Preeti Sharma, David M Kranz
Adoptive T-cell therapies have shown exceptional promise in the treatment of cancer, especially B-cell malignancies. Two distinct strategies have been used to redirect the activity of ex vivo engineered T cells. In one case, the well-known ability of the T-cell receptor (TCR) to recognize a specific peptide bound to a major histocompatibility complex molecule has been exploited by introducing a TCR against a cancer-associated peptide/human leukocyte antigen complex. In the other strategy, synthetic constructs called chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that contain antibody variable domains (single-chain fragments variable) and signaling domains have been introduced into T cells...
2016: F1000Research
Michele Moschetta, Yawara Kawano, Klaus Podar
Unprecedented advances in multiple myeloma (MM) therapy during the last 15 years are predominantly based on our increasing understanding of the pathophysiologic role of the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment. Indeed, new treatment paradigms, which incorporate thalidomide, immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs), and proteasome inhibitors, target the tumor cell as well as its BM microenvironment. Ongoing translational research aims to understand in more detail how disordered BM-niche functions contribute to MM pathogenesis and to identify additional derived targeting agents...
2016: Cancer Treatment and Research
Nikolaos Papadantonakis, Anjali S Advani
This is an exciting time in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) given the advances in the relapsed/refractory setting. The development of antibody treatments (including antibody drug conjugates with toxins) offers a different treatment approach compared with conventional chemotherapy regimens. Moreover, the use of bispecific T-cell-engager antibodies (BiTEs) such as blinatumomab harness the cytotoxic activity of T cells against CD19-positive lymphoblasts. Another strategy involves the use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells...
October 2016: Therapeutic Advances in Hematology
Michael Boice, Darin Salloum, Frederic Mourcin, Viraj Sanghvi, Rada Amin, Elisa Oricchio, Man Jiang, Anja Mottok, Nicolas Denis-Lagache, Giovanni Ciriello, Wayne Tam, Julie Teruya-Feldstein, Elisa de Stanchina, Wing C Chan, Sami N Malek, Daisuke Ennishi, Renier J Brentjens, Randy D Gascoyne, Michel Cogné, Karin Tarte, Hans-Guido Wendel
The HVEM (TNFRSF14) receptor gene is among the most frequently mutated genes in germinal center lymphomas. We report that loss of HVEM leads to cell-autonomous activation of B cell proliferation and drives the development of GC lymphomas in vivo. HVEM-deficient lymphoma B cells also induce a tumor-supportive microenvironment marked by exacerbated lymphoid stroma activation and increased recruitment of T follicular helper (TFH) cells. These changes result from the disruption of inhibitory cell-cell interactions between the HVEM and BTLA (B and T lymphocyte attenuator) receptors...
October 6, 2016: Cell
Lorenz Jahn, Renate S Hagedoorn, Dirk M van der Steen, Pleun Hombrink, Michel G D Kester, Marjolein P Schoonakker, Daniëlle de Ridder, Peter A van Veelen, J H Frederik Falkenburg, Mirjam H M Heemskerk
CD22 is currently evaluated as a target-antigen for the treatment of B-cell malignancies using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T-cells or monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). CAR- and mAbs-based immunotherapies have been successfully applied targeting other antigens, however, occurrence of refractory disease to these interventions urges the identification of additional strategies. Here, we identified a TCR recognizing the CD22-derived peptide RPFPPHIQL (CD22RPF) presented in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B*07:02...
September 26, 2016: Oncotarget
C J DeSelm, M Hamieh, M Sadelain
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 1, 2016: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
M A Cortez, A B Korngold, D R Valdecanas, H G Caruso, S Niknam, L Cooper, J W Welsh
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 1, 2016: International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics
Christoph Bisig, Michèle Roth, Loretta Müller, Pierre Comte, Norbert Heeb, Andreas Mayer, Jan Czerwinski, Alke Petri-Fink, Barbara Rothen-Rutishauser
Ethanol can be produced from biomass and as such is renewable, unlike petroleum-based fuel. Almost all gasoline cars can drive with fuel containing 10% ethanol (E10), flex-fuel cars can even use 85% ethanol (E85). Brazil and the USA already include 10-27% ethanol in their standard fuel by law. Most health effect studies on car emissions are however performed with diesel exhausts, and only few data exists for other fuels. In this work we investigated possible toxic effects of exhaust aerosols from ethanol-gasoline blends using a multi-cellular model of the human lung...
September 23, 2016: Environmental Research
Nafees N Malik, Matthew B Durdy
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 17, 2016: Drug Discovery Today
Nafees N Malik, Matthew B Durdy
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Drug Discovery Today
Zygmunt Zdrojewicz, Ewelina Pachura, Paulina Pachura
Medical science seems to be on the threshold of a revolution: It seems possible that in twenty years, doctors will be able to replace organs in the human body like parts in a car. This is thanks to the recent achievement of a team from the Medical Research Council Center for Regenerative Medicine in Edinburgh, Scotland - the group of researchers tried to regenerate the thymus gland in mice. The thymus gland is an essential organ for the development of the immune system, but very few people have any idea that it exists...
March 2016: Advances in Clinical and Experimental Medicine: Official Organ Wroclaw Medical University
Challice L Bonifant, Hollie J Jackson, Renier J Brentjens, Kevin J Curran
T cells can be genetically modified to target tumors through the expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Most notably, CAR T cells have demonstrated clinical efficacy in hematologic malignancies with more modest responses when targeting solid tumors. However, CAR T cells also have the capacity to elicit expected and unexpected toxicities including: cytokine release syndrome, neurologic toxicity, "on target/off tumor" recognition, and anaphylaxis. Theoretical toxicities including clonal expansion secondary to insertional oncogenesis, graft versus host disease, and off-target antigen recognition have not been clinically evident...
2016: Molecular Therapy Oncolytics
David Killock
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2016: Nature Reviews. Clinical Oncology
Yanling Wu, Shibo Jiang, Tianlei Ying
INTRODUCTION: A variety of approaches are being pursued to improve the safety and antitumor potency of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy. However, most engineering efforts have thus far been focused on its intracellular signaling domain, while its extracellular antigen-binding domain has received less attention. AREAS COVERED: Herein, the authors summarize the current knowledge of CAR T-cell therapy. Accordingly, they focus on its antigen-binding domain, discuss key considerations for selecting an optimal single-chain variable fragment (scFv) when designing a CAR, and suggest potential directions aimed at developing the next-generation CARs...
September 19, 2016: Expert Opinion on Biological Therapy
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