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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28439077/unravelling-the-drastic-range-retraction-of-an-emblematic-songbird-of-north-africa-potential-threats-to-afro-palearctic-migratory-birds
#1
Rassim Khelifa, Rabah Zebsa, Hichem Amari, Mohammed Khalil Mellal, Soufyane Bensouilah, Abdeldjalil Laouar, Hayat Mahdjoub
Understanding how culture may influence biodiversity is fundamental to ensure effective conservation, especially when the practice is local but the implications are global. Despite that, little effort has been devoted to documenting cases of culturally-related biodiversity loss. Here, we investigate the cultural domestication of the European goldfinch (Carduelis carduelis) in western Maghreb (Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia) and the effects of long-term poaching of wild populations (1990-2016) on range distribution, socio-economic value, international trading and potential collateral damage on Afro-Palearctic migratory birds...
April 24, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28434197/multi-modal-signalling-in-estrildid-finches-song-dance-and-colour-are-associated-with-different-ecological-and-life-history-traits
#2
Ana Cristina R Gomes, Caterina Funghi, Masayo Soma, Michael D Sorenson, Gonçalo C Cardoso
Sexual traits (e.g., visual ornaments, acoustic signals, courtship behaviour) are often displayed together as multi-modal signals. Some hypotheses predict joint evolution of different sexual signals (e.g., to increase the efficiency of communication), or that different signals trade-off with each other (e.g., due to limited resources). Alternatively, multiple signals may evolve independently for different functions, or to communicate different information (multiple message hypothesis). We evaluated these hypotheses with a comparative study in the family Estrildidae, one of the largest songbird radiations, and one that includes many model species for research in sexual selection and communication...
April 23, 2017: Journal of Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28428855/conditions-on-the-mexican-moulting-grounds-influence-feather-colour-and-carotenoids-in-bullock-s-orioles-icterus-bullockii
#3
Kaitlin L Sparrow, Kingsley K Donkor, Nancy J Flood, Peter P Marra, Andrew G Pillar, Matthew W Reudink
Carotenoid-based plumage coloration plays a critical role for both inter- and intrasexual communication. Habitat and diet during molt can have important consequences for the development of the ornamental signals used in these contexts. When molt occurs away from the breeding grounds (e.g., pre-alternate molt on the wintering grounds, or stopover molt), discerning the influence of habitat and diet can be particularly important, as these effects may result in important carryover effects that influence territory acquisition or mate choice in subsequent seasons...
April 2017: Ecology and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28424316/correction-lombard-effect-onset-times-reveal-the-speed-of-vocal-plasticity-in-a-songbird
#4
Samuel I Hardman, Sue Anne Zollinger, Klemen Koselj, Stefan Leitner, Rupert C Marshall, Henrik Brumm
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 15, 2017: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28420877/proximate-effects-of-temperature-versus-evolved-intrinsic-constraints-for-embryonic-development-times-among-temperate-and-tropical-songbirds
#5
Riccardo Ton, Thomas E Martin
The relative importance of intrinsic constraints imposed by evolved physiological trade-offs versus the proximate effects of temperature for interspecific variation in embryonic development time remains unclear. Understanding this distinction is important because slow development due to evolved trade-offs can yield phenotypic benefits, whereas slow development from low temperature can yield costs. We experimentally increased embryonic temperature in free-living tropical and north temperate songbird species to test these alternatives...
April 18, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28412929/testosterone-territorial-response-and-song-in-seasonally-breeding-tropical-and-temperate-stonechats
#6
Beate Apfelbeck, Kim G Mortega, Heiner Flinks, Juan Carlos Illera, Barbara Helm
BACKGROUND: Testosterone facilitates physiological, morphological, and behavioral changes required for breeding in male vertebrates. However, testosterone concentrations and the link between its seasonal changes and those in reproductive behaviors vary greatly among species. To better understand the impact of tropical and temperate environments and life history factors on this variation, we have compared testosterone, territorial behavior and song performance across sequential stages of the breeding season in males of 16 closely related taxa of East African tropical and West European temperate stonechats (Saxicola spp), which all breed during a short breeding season, but differ in migratory behavior, seasonal territory-acquisition and pace of life...
April 17, 2017: BMC Evolutionary Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28403555/seasonal-fecundity-and-costs-to-%C3%AE-are-more-strongly-affected-by-direct-than-indirect-predation-effects-across-species
#7
Joseph A LaManna, Thomas E Martin
Increased perceived predation risk can cause behavioral and physiological responses to reduce direct predation mortality, but these responses can also cause demographic costs through reduced reproductive output. Such indirect costs of predation risk have received increased attention in recent years, but the relative importance of direct versus indirect predation costs to population growth (λ) across species remains unclear. We measured direct nest predation rates as well as indirect benefits (i.e. reduced predation rates) and costs (i...
April 12, 2017: Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28393311/discrimination-of-acoustically-similar-conspecific-and-heterospecific-vocalizations-by-black-capped-chickadees-poecile-atricapillus
#8
Allison H Hahn, Kimberley A Campbell, Jenna V Congdon, John Hoang, Neil McMillan, Erin N Scully, Joshua J H Yong, Julie E Elie, Christopher B Sturdy
Chickadees produce a multi-note chick-a-dee call in multiple socially relevant contexts. One component of this call is the D note, which is a low-frequency and acoustically complex note with a harmonic-like structure. In the current study, we tested black-capped chickadees on a between-category operant discrimination task using vocalizations with acoustic structures similar to black-capped chickadee D notes, but produced by various songbird species, in order to examine the role that phylogenetic distance plays in acoustic perception of vocal signals...
April 9, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28391488/selective-auditory-grouping-by-zebra-finches-testing-the-iambic-trochaic-law
#9
Michelle Spierings, Jeroen Hubert, Carel Ten Cate
Humans have a strong tendency to spontaneously group visual or auditory stimuli together in larger patterns. One of these perceptual grouping biases is formulated as the iambic/trochaic law, where humans group successive tones alternating in pitch and intensity as trochees (high-low and loud-soft) and alternating in duration as iambs (short-long). The grouping of alternations in pitch and intensity into trochees is a human universal and is also present in one non-human animal species, rats. The perceptual grouping of sounds alternating in duration seems to be affected by native language in humans and has so far not been found among animals...
April 8, 2017: Animal Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28386436/a-novel-locus-on-chromosome-1-underlies-the-evolution-of-a-melanic-plumage-polymorphism-in-a-wild-songbird
#10
Yann X C Bourgeois, Boris Delahaie, Mathieu Gautier, Emeline Lhuillier, Pierre-Jean G Malé, Joris A M Bertrand, Josselin Cornuault, Kazumasa Wakamatsu, Olivier Bouchez, Claire Mould, Jade Bruxaux, Hélène Holota, Borja Milá, Christophe Thébaud
Understanding the mechanisms responsible for phenotypic diversification within and among species ultimately rests with linking naturally occurring mutations to functionally and ecologically significant traits. Colour polymorphisms are of great interest in this context because discrete colour patterns within a population are often controlled by just a few genes in a common environment. We investigated how and why phenotypic diversity arose and persists in the Zosterops borbonicus white-eye of Reunion (Mascarene archipelago), a colour polymorphic songbird in which all highland populations contain individuals belonging to either a brown or a grey plumage morph...
February 2017: Royal Society Open Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28376915/cold-spell-en-route-delays-spring-arrival-and-decreases-apparent-survival-in-a-long-distance-migratory-songbird
#11
Martins Briedis, Steffen Hahn, Peter Adamík
BACKGROUND: Adjusting the timing of annual events to gradual changes in environmental conditions is necessary for population viability. However, adaptations to weather extremes are poorly documented in migratory species. Due to their vast seasonal movements, long-distance migrants face unique challenges in responding to changes as they rely on an endogenous circannual rhythm to cue the timing of their migration. Furthermore, the exact mechanisms that explain how environmental factors shape the migration schedules of long-distance migrants are often unknown...
April 4, 2017: BMC Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28374674/rules-and-mechanisms-for-efficient-two-stage-learning-in-neural-circuits
#12
Tiberiu Teşileanu, Bence Ölveczky, Vijay Balasubramanian
Trial-and-error learning requires evaluating variable actions and reinforcing successful variants. In songbirds, vocal exploration is induced by LMAN, the output of a basal ganglia-related circuit that also contributes a corrective bias to the vocal output. This bias is gradually consolidated in RA, a motor cortex analogue downstream of LMAN. We develop a new model of such two-stage learning. Using stochastic gradient descent, we derive how the activity in 'tutor' circuits (e.g., LMAN) should match plasticity mechanisms in 'student' circuits (e...
April 4, 2017: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28361169/magnetic-activation-in-the-brain-of-the-migratory-northern-wheatear-oenanthe-oenanthe
#13
D Elbers, M Bulte, F Bairlein, H Mouritsen, D Heyers
Behavioural and neurobiological evidence suggests the involvement of the visual and trigeminal sensory systems in avian magnetoreception. The constantly growing array of new genetic approaches becoming available to scientists would bear great potential to contribute to a generally accepted understanding of the mechanisms underlying this ability, but would require to breed migratory birds in captivity. Here we show that the transcontinental night-migratory Northern Wheatear (Oenanthe oenanthe), which is currently the only migratory songbird successfully being bred in reasonable numbers in captivity, shows magnetic-field-induced neuronal activation in the trigeminal brainstem areas receiving their input through the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve...
March 30, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28355241/effects-of-shallow-natural-gas-well-structures-and-associated-roads-on-grassland-songbird-reproductive-success-in-alberta-canada
#14
Jenny Yoo, Nicola Koper
Grassland songbird populations across North America have experienced dramatic population declines due to habitat loss and degradation. In Canada, energy development continues to fragment and disturb prairie habitat, but effects of oil and gas development on reproductive success of songbirds in North American mixed-grass prairies remains largely unknown. From 2010-2012, in southeastern Alberta, Canada, we monitored 257 nests of two ground-nesting grassland songbird species, Savannah sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis) and chestnut-collared longspur (Calcarius ornatus)...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28344630/flexible-reaction-norms-to-environmental-variables-along-the-migration-route-and-the-significance-of-stopover-duration-for-total-speed-of-migration-in-a-songbird-migrant
#15
Heiko Schmaljohann, Simeon Lisovski, Franz Bairlein
BACKGROUND: Predicting the consequences of continuing anthropogenic changes in the environment for migratory behaviours such as phenology remains a major challenge. Predictions remain particularly difficult, because our knowledge is based on studies from single-snapshot observations at specific stopover sites along birds' migration routes. However, a general understanding on how birds react to prevailing environmental conditions, e.g. their 'phenotypic reaction norm', throughout the annual cycle and along their entire migration routes is required to fully understand how migratory birds respond to rapid environmental change...
2017: Frontiers in Zoology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28343237/actogram-analysis-of-free-flying-migratory-birds-new-perspectives-based-on-acceleration-logging
#16
REVIEW
Johan Bäckman, Arne Andersson, Lykke Pedersen, Sissel Sjöberg, Anders P Tøttrup, Thomas Alerstam
The use of accelerometers has become an important part of biologging techniques for large-sized birds with accelerometer data providing information about flight mode, wing-beat pattern, behaviour and energy expenditure. Such data show that birds using much energy-saving soaring/gliding flight like frigatebirds and swifts can stay airborne without landing for several months. Successful accelerometer studies have recently been conducted also for free-flying small songbirds during their entire annual cycle. Here we review the principles and possibilities for accelerometer studies in bird migration...
March 25, 2017: Journal of Comparative Physiology. A, Neuroethology, Sensory, Neural, and Behavioral Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28331007/advantages-of-comparative-studies-in-songbirds-to-understand-the-neural-basis-of-sensorimotor-integration
#17
Karagh Murphy, Logan S James, Jon T Sakata, Jonathan F Prather
Sensorimotor integration is the process through which the nervous system creates a link between motor commands and associated sensory feedback. This process allows for the acquisition and refinement of many behaviors, including learned communication behaviors like speech and birdsong. Consequently, it is important to understand fundamental mechanisms of sensorimotor integration, and comparative analyses of this process can provide vital insight. Songbirds offer a powerful comparative model system to study how the nervous system links motor and sensory information for learning and control...
March 22, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317843/winter-temperatures-limit-population-growth-rate-of-a-migratory-songbird
#18
Bradley K Woodworth, Nathaniel T Wheelwright, Amy E Newman, Michael Schaub, D Ryan Norris
Understanding the factors that limit and regulate wildlife populations requires insight into demographic and environmental processes acting throughout the annual cycle. Here, we combine multi-year tracking data of individual birds with a 26-year demographic study of a migratory songbird to evaluate the relative effects of density and weather at the breeding and wintering grounds on population growth rate. Our results reveal clear support for opposing forces of winter temperature and breeding density driving population dynamics...
March 20, 2017: Nature Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314822/topography-and-lateralized-effect-of-acute-aromatase-inhibition-on-auditory-processing-in-a-seasonal-songbird
#19
Geert De Groof, Jacques Balthazart, Charlotte A Cornil, Annemie Van der Linden
It is increasingly recognized that brain-derived estrogens (neuroestrogens) can regulate brain physiology and behavior much faster than what was previously known from the transcriptional action of estrogens on nuclear receptors. One of the best examples of such neuromodulation by neuroestrogens concerns the acute regulation of sensory coding by the auditory cortex as demonstrated by electrophysiological studies of selected neurons in zebra finches. Yet, the spatial extent of such modulation by neuroestrogens is not known...
April 19, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28293176/muscarinic-receptors-are-responsible-for-the-cholinergic-modulation-of-projection-neurons-in-the-song-production-brain-nucleus-ra-of-zebra-finches
#20
Wei Meng, Songhua Wang, Lihua Yao, Nan Zhang, Dongfeng Li
Songbirds are a useful model for the study of learned vocal behavior in vertebrates. The robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA) is a premotor nucleus in the vocal motor pathway. It receives excitatory synaptic inputs from the anterior forebrain pathway. RA also receives cholinergic inputs from the ventral paleostriatum of the basal forebrain. Our previous study showed that carbachol, a non-selective cholinergic receptor agonist, modulates the electrophysiology of RA projection neurons (PNs), indicating that cholinergic modulation of RA may play an important role in song production...
2017: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
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