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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28230159/diversity-in-mixed-species-groups-improves-success-in-a-novel-feeder-test-in-a-wild-songbird-community
#1
Todd M Freeberg, Shannon K Eppert, Kathryn E Sieving, Jeffrey R Lucas
Mixed-species groups are common and are thought to provide benefits to group members via enhanced food finding and antipredator abilities. These benefits could accrue due to larger group sizes in general but also to the diverse species composition in the groups. We tested these possibilities using a novel feeder test in a wild songbird community containing three species that varied in their dominant-subordinate status and in their nuclear-satellite roles: Carolina chickadees (Poecile carolinensis), tufted titmice (Baeolophus bicolor), and white-breasted nuthatches (Sitta carolinensis)...
February 23, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28229973/female-conspecifics-restore-rhythmic-singing-behaviour-in-arrhythmic-male-zebra-finches
#2
Neelu Anand Jha, Vinod Kumar
The present study investigated whether pairing with a conspecific female would restore rhythmicity in the singing behaviour of arrhythmic male songbirds. We recorded the singing and, as the circadian response indicator, monitored the activity-rest pattern in male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata) housed without or with a conspecific female under 12 h light: 12 h darkness (12L:12D) or constant bright light (LL bright). Both unpaired and paired birds exhibited a significant daily rhythm in the singing and activity behaviour, but paired birds, under 12L:12D, showed a ~2 h extension in the evening...
March 2017: Journal of Biosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28221825/ecological-and-social-factors-constrain-spatial-and-temporal-opportunities-for-mating-in-a-migratory-songbird
#3
Sara A Kaiser, Benjamin B Risk, T Scott Sillett, Michael S Webster
Many studies of sexual selection assume that individuals have equal mating opportunities and that differences in mating success result from variation in sexual traits. However, the inability of sexual traits to explain variation in male mating success suggests that other factors moderate the strength of sexual selection. Extrapair paternity is common in vertebrates and can contribute to variation in mating success and thus serves as a model for understanding the operation of sexual selection. We developed a spatially explicit, multifactor model of all possible female-male pairings to test the hypothesis that ecological (food availability) and social (breeding density, breeding distance, and the social mate's nest stage) factors influence an individual's opportunity for extrapair paternity in a socially monogamous bird, the black-throated blue warbler, Setophaga caerulescens...
March 2017: American Naturalist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28199421/correction-within-site-variation-in-feather-stable-hydrogen-isotope-%C3%AE-2hf-values-of-boreal-songbirds-implications-for-assignment-to-molt-origin
#4
Cameron J Nordell, Samuel Haché, Erin M Bayne, Péter Sólymos, Kenneth R Foster, Christine M Godwin, Richard Krikun, Peter Pyle, Keith A Hobson
[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0163957.].
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28193557/birds-and-flame-retardants-a-review-of-the-toxic-effects-on-birds-of-historical-and-novel-flame-retardants
#5
REVIEW
Mélanie F Guigueno, Kim J Fernie
Flame retardants (FRs) are a diverse group of chemicals, many of which persist in the environment and bioaccumulate in biota. Although some FRs have been withdrawn from manufacturing and commerce (e.g., legacy FRs), many continue to be detected in the environment; moreover, their replacements and/or other novel FRs are also detected in biota. Here, we review and summarize the literature on the toxic effects of various FRs on birds. Birds integrate chemical information (exposure, effects) across space and time, making them ideal sentinels of environmental contamination...
February 10, 2017: Environmental Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28188699/maturation-dependent-control-of-vocal-temporal-plasticity-in-a-songbird
#6
Ryosuke O Tachibana, Miki Takahasi, Neal A Hessler, Kazuo Okanoya
Birdsong is a unique model to address learning mechanisms of the timing control of sequential behaviors, with characteristic temporal structures consisting of serial sequences of brief vocal elements (syllables) and silent intervals (gaps). Understanding the neural mechanisms for plasticity of such sequential behavior should be aided by characterization of its developmental changes. Here, we assessed the level of acute vocal plasticity between young and adult Bengalese finches, and also quantified developmental change in variability of temporal structure...
February 11, 2017: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28188629/orthogonal-topography-in-the-parallel-input-architecture-of-songbird-hvc
#7
Kevin C Elliott, Wei Wu, Richard Bertram, Richard L Hyson, Frank Johnson
Neural activity within the cortical premotor nucleus HVC (acronym is name) encodes the learned songs of adult male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata). HVC activity is driven and/or modulated by a group of five afferent nuclei (the Medial Magnocellular nucleus of the Anterior Nidopallium, MMAN; Nucleus Interface, NIf; nucleus Avalanche, Av; the Robust nucleus of the Arcopallium, RA; the Uvaeform nucleus, Uva). While earlier evidence suggested that HVC receives a uniformly distributed and non-topographic pattern of afferent input, recent evidence suggests this view is incorrect (Basista et al...
February 11, 2017: Journal of Comparative Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28170164/perineuronal-nets-and-vocal-plasticity-in-songbirds-a-proposed-mechanism-to-explain-the-difference-between-closed-ended-and-open-ended-learning
#8
Gilles Cornez, Farrah N Madison, Annemie Van der Linden, Charlotte Cornil, Kathleen M Yoder, Gregory F Ball, Jacques Balthazart
Perineuronal nets (PNN) are aggregations of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans surrounding the soma and proximal processes of neurons, mostly GABAergic interneurons expressing parvalbumin. They limit the plasticity of their afferent synaptic connections. In zebra finches PNN develop in an experience-dependent manner in the song control nuclei HVC and RA (nucleus robustus arcopallialis) when young birds crystallize their song. Because songbird species that are open-ended learners tend to recapitulate each year the different phases of song learning until their song crystallizes at the beginning of the breeding season, we tested whether seasonal changes in PNN expression would be found in the song control nuclei of a seasonally breeding species such as the European starling...
February 7, 2017: Developmental Neurobiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28168699/the-role-of-sexual-and-natural-selection-in-shaping-patterns-of-sexual-dichromatism-in-the-largest-family-of-songbirds-aves-thraupidae
#9
Allison J Shultz, Kevin J Burns
Males and females can be under different evolutionary pressures if sexual and natural selection is differentially operating in each sex. As a result, many species have evolved sexual dichromatism, or differences in coloration between sexes. Although sexual dichromatism is often used as an index of the magnitude of sexual selection, sexual dichromatism is a composite trait. Here, we examine the evolution of sexual dichromatism in one of the largest and most ecologically diverse families of birds, the tanagers, using the avian visual perspective and a species-level phylogeny...
February 7, 2017: Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28165890/enterobacteriaceae-harboring-ampc-blacmy-and-esbl-blactx-m-in-migratory-and-nonmigratory-wild-songbird-populations-on-ohio-dairies
#10
Dimitria A Mathys, Blake A Mathys, Dixie F Mollenkopf, Joshua B Daniels, Thomas E Wittum
Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) confer bacterial resistance to critically important antimicrobials, including extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs). Livestock are important reservoirs for the zoonotic food-borne transmission of ESC-resistant enteric bacteria. Our aim is to describe the potential role of migratory and resident wild birds in the epidemiology of ESBL-mediated bacterial resistance on dairy farms. Using mist nets, we sampled wild migratory and resident birds either immediately adjacent to or 600 ft away from free-stall barns on three Ohio dairy farms during the 2014 and 2015 spring migrations...
February 6, 2017: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28163325/social-calls-provide-novel-insights-into-the-evolution-of-vocal-learning
#11
Kendra B Sewall, Anna M Young, Timothy F Wright
Learned song is among the best-studied models of animal communication. In oscine songbirds, where learned song is most prevalent, it is used primarily for intrasexual selection and mate attraction. Learning of a different class of vocal signals, known as contact calls, is found in a diverse array of species, where they are used to mediate social interactions among individuals. We argue that call learning provides a taxonomically rich system for studying testable hypotheses for the evolutionary origins of vocal learning...
October 2016: Animal Behaviour
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28159910/temperature-manipulation-in-songbird-brain-implicates-the-premotor-nucleus-hvc-in-birdsong-syntax
#12
Yisi S Zhang, Jason D Wittenbach, Dezhe Z Jin, Alexay A Kozhevnikov
: Variable motor sequences of animals are often structured and can be described by probabilistic transition rules between action elements. Examples include the songs of many songbird species such as the Bengalese finch, which consist of stereotypical syllables sequenced according to probabilistic rules (song syntax). The neural mechanisms behind such rules are poorly understood. Here we investigate where the song syntax is encoded in the brain of the Bengalese finch by rapidly and reversibly manipulating the temperature in the song production pathway...
February 3, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28152581/bridging-of-cryptic-borrelia-cycles-in-european-songbirds
#13
Dieter Heylen, Aleksandra Krawczyk, Isabel Lopes de Carvalho, Maria Sofia Núncio, Hein Sprong, Ana Cláudia Norte
The principal European vector for Borrelia burgdorferi s.l., the causative agents of Lyme disease, is the host-generalist tick Ixodes ricinus. Almost all terrestrial host-specialist ticks have been supposed not to contribute to the terrestrial Borrelia transmission cycles. Through an experiment with blackbirds, we show successful transmission by the widespread I. frontalis, an abundant bird-specialized tick that infests a broad range of songbirds. In the first phase of the experiment, we obtained Borrelia-infected I...
February 2, 2017: Environmental Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28147243/song-associated-reward-correlates-with-endocannabinoid-related-gene-expression-in-male-european-starlings-sturnus-vulgaris
#14
Allison H Hahn, Devin P Merullo, Jeremy A Spool, Caroline S Angyal, Sharon A Stevenson, Lauren V Riters
Vocal communication is required for successful social interactions in numerous species. During the breeding season, songbirds produce songs that are reinforced by behavioral consequences (e.g., copulation). However, some songbirds also produce songs not obviously directed at other individuals. The consequences maintaining or reinforcing these songs are less obvious and the neural mechanisms associated with undirected communication are not well-understood. Previous studies indicate that undirected singing is intrinsically rewarding and mediated by opioid or dopaminergic systems; however, endocannabinoids are also involved in regulating reward and singing behavior...
January 29, 2017: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28144622/the-effects-of-pitch-shifts-on-delay-induced-changes-in-vocal-sequencing-in-a-songbird
#15
MacKenzie Wyatt, Emily A Berthiaume, Conor W Kelly, Samuel J Sober
Like human speech, vocal behavior in songbirds depends critically on auditory feedback. In both humans and songbirds, vocal skills are acquired by a process of imitation whereby current vocal production is compared to an acoustic target. Similarly, performance in adulthood relies strongly on auditory feedback, and online manipulations of auditory signals can dramatically alter acoustic production even after vocalizations have been well learned. Artificially delaying auditory feedback can disrupt both speech and birdsong, and internal delays in auditory feedback have been hypothesized as a cause of vocal dysfluency in persons who stutter...
January 2017: ENeuro
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28141859/studies-of-hvc-plasticity-in-adult-canaries-reveal-social-effects-and-sex-differences-as-well-as-limitations-of-multiple-markers-available-to-assess-adult-neurogenesis
#16
Olesya T Shevchouk, Gregory F Ball, Charlotte A Cornil, Jacques Balthazart
In songbirds, neurogenesis in the song control nucleus HVC is sensitive to the hormonal and social environment but the dynamics of this process is difficult to assess with a single exogenous marker of new neurons. We simultaneously used three independent markers to investigate HVC neurogenesis in male and female canaries. Males were castrated, implanted with testosterone and housed either alone (M), with a female (M-F) or with another male (M-M) while females were implanted with 17β-estradiol and housed with a male (F-M)...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28129381/comparative-cytogenetics-between-two-important-songbird-models-the-zebra-finch-and-the-canary
#17
Michelly da Silva Dos Santos, Rafael Kretschmer, Carolina Frankl-Vilches, Antje Bakker, Manfred Gahr, Patricia C M O Brien, Malcolm A Ferguson-Smith, Edivaldo H C de Oliveira
Songbird species (order Passeriformes, suborder Oscines) are important models in various experimental fields spanning behavioural genomics to neurobiology. Although the genomes of some songbird species were sequenced recently, the chromosomal organization of these species is mostly unknown. Here we focused on the two most studied songbird species in neuroscience, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) and the canary (Serinus canaria). In order to clarify these issues and also to integrate chromosome data with their assembled genomes, we used classical and molecular cytogenetics in both zebra finch and canary to define their chromosomal homology, localization of heterochromatic blocks and distribution of rDNA clusters...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28120803/vocal-matching-the-what-the-why-and-the-how
#18
REVIEW
Stephanie L King, Peter K McGregor
Over the years, vocal matching has progressed beyond being an interesting behavioural phenomenon to one that now has relevance to a wide range of fields. In this review, we use birds and cetaceans to explain what vocal matching is, why animals vocally match and how vocal matching can be identified. We show that while the functional aspects of vocal matching are similar, the contexts in which matching is used can differ between taxa. Whereas vocal matching in songbirds facilitates mate attraction and the immediate defence of resources, in parrots and cetaceans it plays a role in the maintenance of social bonds and the promotion of behavioural synchrony...
October 2016: Biology Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28120319/sexual-communication-and-domestication-may-give-rise-to-the-signal-complexity-necessary-for-the-emergence-of-language-an-indication-from-songbird-studies
#19
Kazuo Okanoya
For language to be a vehicle of thought, protolanguage must develop a degree of complexity that allows for the syntactic manipulation of symbol sequences. Thus, before language emerged, a process in which signals became complex must have occurred. Here, we submit a scenario describing the process in which courtship songs gained in complexity during the course of domestication of Bengalese finches. By comparing domesticated Bengalese finches with their wild strain, white-rumped munias, we found that female preferences for complex songs were coupled with domesticated relaxed environments to give rise to song complexity...
January 24, 2017: Psychonomic Bulletin & Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28114902/two-new-genera-of-songbirds-represent-endemic-radiations-from-the-shola-sky-islands-of-the-western-ghats-india
#20
V V Robin, C K Vishnudas, Pooja Gupta, Frank E Rheindt, Daniel M Hooper, Uma Ramakrishnan, Sushma Reddy
BACKGROUND: A long-standing view of Indian biodiversity is that while rich in species, there are few endemics or in-situ radiations within the subcontinent. One exception is the Western Ghats biodiversity hotspot, an isolated mountain range with many endemic species. Understanding the origins of the montane-restricted species is crucial to illuminate both taxonomic and environmental history. RESULTS: With evidence from genetic, morphometric, song, and plumage data, we show that two songbird lineages endemic to the Western Ghats montane forest each have diversified into multiple distinct species...
January 23, 2017: BMC Evolutionary Biology
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