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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318286/asking-better-questions-how-presentation-formats-influence-information-search
#1
Charley M Wu, Björn Meder, Flavia Filimon, Jonathan D Nelson
While the influence of presentation formats have been widely studied in Bayesian reasoning tasks, we present the first systematic investigation of how presentation formats influence information search decisions. Four experiments were conducted across different probabilistic environments, where subjects (N = 2,858) chose between 2 possible search queries, each with binary probabilistic outcomes, with the goal of maximizing classification accuracy. We studied 14 different numerical and visual formats for presenting information about the search environment, constructed across 6 design features that have been prominently related to improvements in Bayesian reasoning accuracy (natural frequencies, posteriors, complement, spatial extent, countability, and part-to-whole information)...
March 20, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. Learning, Memory, and Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284798/interactions-between-the-anterior-cingulate-insula-network-and-the-fronto-parietal-network-during-perceptual-decision-making
#2
Ganesh B Chand, Mukesh Dhamala
Information processing in the human brain during cognitively demanding goal-directed tasks is thought to involve several large-scale brain networks, including the anterior cingulate-insula network (aCIN) and the fronto-parietal network (FPN). Recent functional MRI (fMRI) studies have provided clues that the aCIN initiates activity changes in the FPN. However, when and how often these networks interact remains largely unknown to date. Here, we systematically examined the oscillatory interactions between the aCIN and the FPN by using the spectral Granger causality analysis of reconstructed brain source signals from the scalp electroencephalography (EEG) recorded from human participants performing a face-house perceptual categorization task...
March 8, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28282740/video-based-training-to-improve-perceptual-cognitive-decision-making-performance-of-australian-football-umpires
#3
Paul Larkin, Christopher Mesagno, Jason Berry, Michael Spittle, Jack Harvey
Decision-making is a central component of the in-game performance of Australian football umpires; however, current umpire training focuses largely on physiological development with decision-making skills development conducted via explicit lecture-style meetings with limited practice devoted to making actual decisions. Therefore, this study investigated the efficacy of a video-based training programme, aimed to provide a greater amount of contextualised visual experiences without explicit instruction, to improve decision-making skills of umpires...
March 4, 2017: Journal of Sports Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28256514/pupil-linked-arousal-is-driven-by-decision-uncertainty-and-alters-serial-choice-bias
#4
Anne E Urai, Anke Braun, Tobias H Donner
While judging their sensory environments, decision-makers seem to use the uncertainty about their choices to guide adjustments of their subsequent behaviour. One possible source of these behavioural adjustments is arousal: decision uncertainty might drive the brain's arousal systems, which control global brain state and might thereby shape subsequent decision-making. Here, we measure pupil diameter, a proxy for central arousal state, in human observers performing a perceptual choice task of varying difficulty...
March 3, 2017: Nature Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28250149/perceptual-and-categorical-decision-making-goal-relevant-representation-of-two-domains-at-different-levels-of-abstraction
#5
Swetha Shankar, Andrew S Kayser
To date it has been unclear whether perceptual decision making and rule-based categorization reflect activation of similar cognitive processes and brain regions. On the one hand, both map potentially ambiguous stimuli to a smaller set of motor responses. On the other, decisions about perceptual salience typically concern concrete sensory representations derived from a noisy stimulus, while categorization is typically conceptualized as an abstract decision about membership in a potentially arbitrary set. Previous work has primarily examined these types of decisions in isolation...
March 1, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28242798/visuospatial-asymmetries-arise-from-differences-in-the-onset-time-of-perceptual-evidence-accumulation
#6
Daniel P Newman, Gerard M Loughnane, Simon P Kelly, Redmond G O'Connell, Mark A Bellgrove
Healthy subjects tend to exhibit a bias of visual attention whereby left hemifield stimuli are processed more quickly and accurately than stimuli appearing in the right hemifield. It has long been held that this phenomenon arises from the dominant role of the right cerebral hemisphere in regulating attention, however, methods that would allow for a more precise understanding of the mechanisms underpinning visuospatial bias have remained elusive. We sought to finely trace the temporal evolution of spatial biases by leveraging a novel bilateral dot motion detection paradigm...
February 27, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28238657/frogs-exploit-statistical-regularities-in-noisy-acoustic-scenes-to-solve-cocktail-party-like-problems
#7
Norman Lee, Jessica L Ward, Alejandro Vélez, Christophe Micheyl, Mark A Bee
Noise is a ubiquitous source of errors in all forms of communication [1]. Noise-induced errors in speech communication, for example, make it difficult for humans to converse in noisy social settings, a challenge aptly named the "cocktail party problem" [2]. Many nonhuman animals also communicate acoustically in noisy social groups and thus face biologically analogous problems [3]. However, we know little about how the perceptual systems of receivers are evolutionarily adapted to avoid the costs of noise-induced errors in communication...
March 6, 2017: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28231459/multisensory-conflict-resolution-should-i-stay-or-should-i-go
#8
Daniel B Polley
Swift action is often required in the face of indeterminate sensory evidence. In this issue of Neuron, Song et al. (2017) describe an inhibitory circuit in the posterior parietal cortex that evaluates conflicting auditory and visual cues and supports resolute perceptual decision making.
February 22, 2017: Neuron
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28223519/robust-sampling-of-decision-information-during-perceptual-choice
#9
Hildward Vandormael, Santiago Herce Castañón, Jan Balaguer, Vickie Li, Christopher Summerfield
Humans move their eyes to gather information about the visual world. However, saccadic sampling has largely been explored in paradigms that involve searching for a lone target in a cluttered array or natural scene. Here, we investigated the policy that humans use to overtly sample information in a perceptual decision task that required information from across multiple spatial locations to be combined. Participants viewed a spatial array of numbers and judged whether the average was greater or smaller than a reference value...
March 7, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28209980/the-contribution-of-the-human-posterior-parietal-cortex-to-episodic-memory
#10
REVIEW
Carlo Sestieri, Gordon L Shulman, Maurizio Corbetta
The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is traditionally associated with attention, perceptual decision making and sensorimotor transformations, but more recent human neuroimaging studies support an additional role in episodic memory retrieval. In this Opinion article, we present a functional-anatomical model of the involvement of the PPC in memory retrieval. Parietal regions involved in perceptual attention and episodic memory are largely segregated and often show a push-pull relationship, potentially mediated by prefrontal regions...
February 17, 2017: Nature Reviews. Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203355/who-is-the-usual-suspect-evidence-of-a-selection-bias-toward-faces-that-make-direct-eye-contact-in-a-lineup-task
#11
Jessica Taubert, Celine van Golde, Frans A J Verstraten
The speed and ease with which we recognize the faces of our friends and family members belies the difficulty we have recognizing less familiar individuals. Nonetheless, overconfidence in our ability to recognize faces has carried over into various aspects of our legal system; for instance, eyewitness identification serves a critical role in criminal proceedings. For this reason, understanding the perceptual and psychological processes that underlie false identification is of the utmost importance. Gaze direction is a salient social signal and direct eye contact, in particular, is thought to capture attention...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28185587/local-self-governance-in-health-a-study-of-it-s-functioning-in-odisha-india
#12
Bhuputra Panda, Sanjay P Zodpey, Harshad P Thakur
BACKGROUND: Local decision making is linked to several service quality improvement parameters. Rogi Kalyan Samitis (RKS) at peripheral decision making health units (DMHU) are composite bodies that are mandated to ensure accountability and transparency in governance, improve quality of services, and facilitate local responsiveness. There is scant literature on the nature of functioning of these institutions in Odisha. This study aimed to assess the perception of RKS members about their roles, involvement and practices with respect to local decision making and management of DMHUs; it further examined perceptual and functional differences between priority and non-priority district set-ups; and identified predictors of involvement of RKS members in local governance of health units...
October 31, 2016: BMC Health Services Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28179477/perceptual-precision-of-passive-body-tilt-is-consistent-with-statistically-optimal-cue-integration
#13
Koeun Lim, Faisal Karmali, Keyvan Nicoucar, Daniel M Merfeld
When making perceptual decisions, humans have been shown to optimally integrate independent noisy multisensory information - matching maximum likelihood (ML) limits. Such ML estimators provide a theoretic limit to perceptual precision (i.e., minimal thresholds). However, how the brain combines two interacting (i.e., not independent) sensory cues remains an open question. To study the precision achieved when combining interacting sensory signals, we measured perceptual roll tilt and roll rotation thresholds between 0 and 5Hz in 6 normal human subjects...
February 8, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28179164/metacognitive-ability-correlates-with-hippocampal-and-prefrontal-microstructure
#14
Micah Allen, James C Glen, Daniel Müllensiefen, Dietrich Samuel Schwarzkopf, Francesca Fardo, Darya Frank, Martina F Callaghan, Geraint Rees
The ability to introspectively evaluate our experiences to form accurate metacognitive beliefs, or insight, is an essential component of decision-making. Previous research suggests individuals vary substantially in their level of insight, and that this variation is related to brain volume and function, particularly in the anterior prefrontal cortex (aPFC). However, the neurobiological mechanisms underlying these effects are unclear, as qualitative, macroscopic measures such as brain volume can be related to a variety of microstructural features...
February 4, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28163007/vestibular-contributions-to-high-level-sensorimotor-functions
#15
W Pieter Medendorp, Luc J P Selen
The vestibular system, which detects motion and orientation of the head in space, is known to be important in controlling gaze to stabilize vision, to ensure postural stability and to provide our sense of self-motion. While the brain's computations underlying these functions are extensively studied, the role of the vestibular system in higher level sensorimotor functions is less clear. This review covers new research on the vestibular influence on perceptual judgments, motor decisions, and the ability to learn multiple motor actions...
February 2, 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28162897/opposite-effects-of-recent-history-on-perception-and-decision
#16
Matthias Fritsche, Pim Mostert, Floris P de Lange
Recent studies claim that visual perception of stimulus features, such as orientation, numerosity, and faces, is systematically biased toward visual input from the immediate past [1-3]. However, the extent to which these positive biases truly reflect changes in perception rather than changes in post-perceptual processes is unclear [4, 5]. In the current study we sought to disentangle perceptual and decisional biases in visual perception. We found that post-perceptual decisions about orientation were indeed systematically biased toward previous stimuli and this positive bias did not strongly depend on the spatial location of previous stimuli (replicating previous work [1])...
February 20, 2017: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28151976/transient-emotional-events-and-individual-affective-traits-affect-emotion-recognition-in-a-perceptual-decision-making-task
#17
Emilie Qiao-Tasserit, Maria Garcia Quesada, Lia Antico, Daphne Bavelier, Patrik Vuilleumier, Swann Pichon
Both affective states and personality traits shape how we perceive the social world and interpret emotions. The literature on affective priming has mostly focused on brief influences of emotional stimuli and emotional states on perceptual and cognitive processes. Yet this approach does not fully capture more dynamic processes at the root of emotional states, with such states lingering beyond the duration of the inducing external stimuli. Our goal was to put in perspective three different types of affective states (induced affective states, more sustained mood states and affective traits such as depression and anxiety) and investigate how they may interact and influence emotion perception...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28150431/should-learners-reason-one-step-at-a-time-a-randomised-trial-of-two-diagnostic-scheme-designs
#18
Sarah Blissett, Deric Morrison, David McCarty, Matthew Sibbald
CONTEXT: Making a diagnosis can be difficult for learners as they must integrate multiple clinical variables. Diagnostic schemes can help learners with this complex task. A diagnostic scheme is an algorithm that organises possible diagnoses by assigning signs or symptoms (e.g. systolic murmur) to groups of similar diagnoses (e.g. aortic stenosis and aortic sclerosis) and provides distinguishing features to help discriminate between similar diagnoses (e.g. carotid pulse). The current literature does not identify whether scheme layouts should guide learners to reason one step at a time in a terminally branching scheme or weigh multiple variables simultaneously in a hybrid scheme...
February 2, 2017: Medical Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28146180/perceptional-gaps-among-women-husbands-and-family-members-about-intentions-for-birthplace-a-cross-sectional-study
#19
Yoko Shimpuku, Frida Elikana Madeni, Shigeko Horiuchi, Sebalda Charles Leshabari
Objective: women are more likely to give birth at a health facility when their families agree with the birthplace. However, in rural areas of Tanzania, women are often marginalized from decision-making. This study predicted birthplace intention and identified factors to reduce perceptional gaps among pregnant women, husbands and family members. Method: explanatory cross-sectional survey was conducted in three villages in North Eastern Tanzania. Participants were 138 pregnant women and their families who answered the Birth Intention Questionnaire (BIQ), measuring knowledge, attitude, perceived behavioral control, subjective norms and intention for birthplace...
January 30, 2017: Revista Latino-americana de Enfermagem
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28137358/distinct-mechanisms-mediate-speed-accuracy-adjustments-in-cortico-subthalamic-networks
#20
Damian M Herz, Huiling Tan, John-Stuart Brittain, Petra Fischer, Binith Cheeran, Alexander L Green, James FitzGerald, Tipu Z Aziz, Keyoumars Ashkan, Simon Little, Thomas Foltynie, Patricia Limousin, Ludvic Zrinzo, Rafal Bogacz, Peter Brown
Optimal decision-making requires balancing fast but error-prone and more accurate but slower decisions through adjustments of decision thresholds. Here, we demonstrate two distinct correlates of such speed-accuracy adjustments by recording subthalamic nucleus (STN) activity and electroencephalography in 11 Parkinson's disease patients during a perceptual decision-making task; STN low-frequency oscillatory (LFO) activity (2-8 Hz), coupled to activity at prefrontal electrode Fz, and STN beta activity (13-30 Hz) coupled to electrodes C3/C4 close to motor cortex...
January 31, 2017: ELife
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