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perceptual decision making

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28635378/people-with-autism-spectrum-conditions-make-more-consistent-decisions
#1
George D Farmer, Simon Baron-Cohen, William J Skylark
People with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) show reduced sensitivity to contextual stimuli in many perceptual and cognitive tasks. We investigated whether this also applies to decision making by examining adult participants' choices between pairs of consumer products that were presented with a third, less desirable "decoy" option. Participants' preferences between the items in a given pair frequently switched when the third item in the set was changed, but this tendency was reduced among individuals with ASC, which indicated that their choices were more consistent and conventionally rational than those of control participants...
June 1, 2017: Psychological Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28614849/perceptual-learning-is-specific-beyond-vision-and-decision-making
#2
Lukasz Grzeczkowski, Aline Cretenoud, Michael H Herzog, Fred W Mast
Perceptual learning is usually assumed to occur within sensory areas or when sensory evidence is mapped onto decisions. Subsequent procedural and motor processes, involved in most perceptual learning experiments, are thought to play no role in the learning process. Here, we show that this is not the case. Observers trained with a standard three-line bisection task and indicated the offset direction of the central line by pressing either a left or right push button. Before and after training, observers adjusted the central line of the same bisection stimulus using a computer mouse...
June 1, 2017: Journal of Vision
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28611387/visuotactile-integration-modulates-motor-performance-in-a-perceptual-decision-making-task
#3
Klaudia Grechuta, Jelena Guga, Giovanni Maffei, Belen Ballester Rubio, Paul F M J Verschure
Body ownership is critically dependent on multimodal integration as for instance revealed in the Rubber Hand Illusion (RHI) and a number of studies which have addressed the neural correlates of the processes underlying this phenomenon. Both experimental and clinical research have shown that the structures underlying body ownership seem to significantly overlap with those of motor control including the parietal and ventral premotor cortices, Temporal Parietal Junction (TPJ) and the insula. This raises the question of whether this structural overlap between body ownership and motor control structures is of any functional significance...
June 13, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28606805/decision-ambiguity-is-mediated-by-a-late-positive-potential-originating-from-cingulate-cortex
#4
Sai Sun, Shanshan Zhen, Zhongzheng Fu, Daw-An Wu, Shinsuke Shimojo, Ralph Adolphs, Rongjun Yu, Shuo Wang
People often make decisions in the face of ambiguous information, but it remains unclear how ambiguity is represented in the brain. We used three types of ambiguous stimuli and combined EEG and fMRI to examine the neural representation of perceptual decisions under ambiguity. We identified a late positive potential, the LPP, which differentiated levels of ambiguity, and which was specifically associated with behavioral judgments about choices that were ambiguous, rather than passive perception of ambiguous stimuli...
June 9, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28597236/bayesian-analysis-of-the-piecewise-diffusion-decision-model
#5
William R Holmes, Jennifer S Trueblood
Most past research on sequential sampling models of decision-making have assumed a time homogeneous process (i.e., parameters such as drift rates and boundaries are constant and do not change during the deliberation process). This has largely been due to the theoretical difficulty in testing and fitting more complex models. In recent years, the development of simulation-based modeling approaches matched with Bayesian fitting methodologies has opened the possibility of developing more complex models such as those with time-varying properties...
June 8, 2017: Behavior Research Methods
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28593461/self-prioritization-and-perceptual-matching-the-effects-of-temporal-construal
#6
Marius Golubickis, Johanna K Falben, Arash Sahraie, Aleksandar Visokomogilski, William A Cunningham, Jie Sui, C Neil Macrae
Recent research has revealed that self-referential processing enhances perceptual judgments - the so-called self-prioritization effect. The extent and origin of this effect remains unknown, however. Noting the multifaceted nature of the self, here we hypothesized that temporal influences on self-construal (i.e., past/future-self continuity) may serve as an important determinant of stimulus prioritization. Specifically, as representations of the self increase in abstraction as a function of temporal distance (i...
June 7, 2017: Memory & Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28585159/need-for-closure-is-associated-with-urgency-in-perceptual-decision-making
#7
Nathan J Evans, Babette Rae, Maxim Bushmakin, Mark Rubin, Scott D Brown
Constant decision-making underpins much of daily life, from simple perceptual decisions about navigation through to more complex decisions about important life events. At many scales, a fundamental task of the decision-maker is to balance competing needs for caution and urgency: fast decisions can be more efficient, but also more often wrong. We show how a single mathematical framework for decision-making explains the urgency/caution balance across decision-making at two very different scales. This explanation has been applied at the level of neuronal circuits (on a time scale of hundreds of milliseconds) through to the level of stable personality traits (time scale of years)...
June 5, 2017: Memory & Cognition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28573716/painful-decisions-how-classifying-sensations-can-change-the-experience-of-pain
#8
M A van der Meulen, F Anton, S Petersen
BACKGROUND: Categorizing perceptual stimuli is a mechanism for facilitating the processing of sensory input from our environment. This facilitation of perception is achieved through generalization (assimilation) of stimulus characteristics within categories and accentuation between categories. These categorization processes have been demonstrated in visual, auditory, tactile and social perception, but never in pain perception. METHOD: We presented participants with six thermal noxious stimuli, increasing in steps of 0...
June 2, 2017: European Journal of Pain: EJP
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28566360/social-information-is-integrated-into-value-and-confidence-judgments-according-to-its-reliability
#9
Benedetto De Martino, Sebastian Bobadilla-Suarez, Takao Nouguchi, Tali Sharot, Bradley C Love
How much we like something, whether it be a bottle of wine or a new film, is affected by the opinions of others. However, the social information we receive can be contradictory and vary in its reliability. Here we test whether the brain incorporates these statistics when judging value and confidence. Participants provided value judgments about consumer goods in the presence of online reviews. We found participants updated their initial value and confidence judgments in a Bayesian fashion, taking into account both the uncertainty of their initial beliefs and the reliability of the social information...
May 31, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28560245/assistive-lesion-emphasis-system-an-assistive-system-for-fundus-image-readers
#10
Samrudhdhi B Rangrej, Jayanthi Sivaswamy
Computer-assisted diagnostic (CAD) tools are of interest as they enable efficient decision-making in clinics and the screening of diseases. The traditional approach to CAD algorithm design focuses on the automated detection of abnormalities independent of the end-user, who can be an image reader or an expert. We propose a reader-centric system design wherein a reader's attention is drawn to abnormal regions in a least-obtrusive yet effective manner, using saliency-based emphasis of abnormalities and without altering the appearance of the background tissues...
April 2017: Journal of Medical Imaging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28559801/parsing-heterogeneous-striatal-activity
#11
REVIEW
Kae Nakamura, Long Ding
The striatum is an input channel of the basal ganglia and is well known to be involved in reward-based decision making and learning. At the macroscopic level, the striatum has been postulated to contain parallel functional modules, each of which includes neurons that perform similar computations to support selection of appropriate actions for different task contexts. At the single-neuron level, however, recent studies in monkeys and rodents have revealed heterogeneity in neuronal activity even within restricted modules of the striatum...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroanatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28553219/a-bayesian-reformulation-of-the-extended-drift-diffusion-model-in-perceptual-decision-making
#12
Pouyan R Fard, Hame Park, Andrej Warkentin, Stefan J Kiebel, Sebastian Bitzer
Perceptual decision making can be described as a process of accumulating evidence to a bound which has been formalized within drift-diffusion models (DDMs). Recently, an equivalent Bayesian model has been proposed. In contrast to standard DDMs, this Bayesian model directly links information in the stimulus to the decision process. Here, we extend this Bayesian model further and allow inter-trial variability of two parameters following the extended version of the DDM. We derive parameter distributions for the Bayesian model and show that they lead to predictions that are qualitatively equivalent to those made by the extended drift-diffusion model (eDDM)...
2017: Frontiers in Computational Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28546309/inferential-learning-of-serial-order-of-perceptual-categories-by-rhesus-monkeys-macaca-mulatta
#13
Natalie Tanner, Greg Jensen, Vincent P Ferrera, Herbert S Terrace
Category learning in animals is typically trained explicitly, in most instances by varying the exemplars of a single category in a matching-to-sample task. Here, we show that male rhesus macaques can learn categories by a transitive inference paradigm in which novel exemplars of five categories were presented throughout training. Instead of requiring decisions about a constant set of repetitively presented stimuli, we studied the macaque's ability to determine the relative order of multiple exemplars of particular stimuli that were rarely repeated...
May 25, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544409/mind-the-gap-temporal-discrimination-and-dystonia
#14
A Sadnicka, C Daum, C Cordivari, K P Bhatia, J C Rothwell, S Manohar, M J Edwards
BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: One of the most widely studied perceptual measures of sensory dysfunction in dystonia is the temporal discrimination threshold (TDT) (the shortest interval at which subjects can perceive that there are two stimuli rather than one). However the elevated thresholds described may be due to a number of potential mechanisms as current paradigms test not only temporal discrimination but also extraneous sensory and decision-making parameters. In this study two paradigms designed to better quantify temporal processing are presented and a decision-making model is used to assess the influence of decision strategy...
June 2017: European Journal of Neurology: the Official Journal of the European Federation of Neurological Societies
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28533182/biased-visceral-perception-through-fear-learning-biased-intensity-judgements-of-visceral-sensations-after-learning-to-fear-visceral-stimuli-a-drift-diffusion-approach
#15
Jonas Zaman, Victoria J Madden, Julie Iven, Katja Wiech, Nathalie Weltens, Huynh Giao Ly, Johan W S Vlaeyen, Lukas Van Oudenhove, Ilse Van Diest
A growing body of research has identified fear of visceral sensations as a potential mechanism in the development and maintenance of visceral pain disorders. However, the extent to which such learned fear affects visceroception remains unclear. To address this question, we used a differential fear conditioning paradigm with non-painful esophageal balloon distensions of two different intensities as conditioning stimuli (CSs). The experiment comprised pre-acquisition, acquisition and post-acquisition phases during which participants categorized the CSs with respect to their intensity...
May 19, 2017: Journal of Pain: Official Journal of the American Pain Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28532348/perceptual-learning-use-dependent-cortical-plasticity
#16
Wu Li
Our perceptual abilities significantly improve with practice. This phenomenon, known as perceptual learning, offers an ideal window for understanding use-dependent changes in the adult brain. Different experimental approaches have revealed a diversity of behavioral and cortical changes associated with perceptual learning, and different interpretations have been given with respect to the cortical loci and neural processes responsible for the learning. Accumulated evidence has begun to put together a coherent picture of the neural substrates underlying perceptual learning...
October 14, 2016: Annual Review of Vision Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28516294/does-seeing-an-asian-face-make-speech-sound-more-accented
#17
Yi Zheng, Arthur G Samuel
Prior studies have reported that seeing an Asian face makes American English sound more accented. The current study investigates whether this effect is perceptual, or if it instead occurs at a later decision stage. We first replicated the finding that showing static Asian and Caucasian faces can shift people's reports about the accentedness of speech accompanying the pictures. When we changed the static pictures to dubbed videos, reducing the demand characteristics, the shift in reported accentedness largely disappeared...
May 17, 2017: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28506359/humans-treat-unreliable-filled-in-percepts-as-more-real-than-veridical-ones
#18
Benedikt V Ehinger, Katja Häusser, José P Ossandón, Peter König
Humans often evaluate sensory signals according to their reliability for optimal decision-making. However, how do we evaluate percepts generated in the absence of direct input that are, therefore, completely unreliable? Here, we utilize the phenomenon of filling-in occurring at the physiological blind-spots to compare partially inferred and veridical percepts. Subjects chose between stimuli that elicit filling-in, and perceptually equivalent ones presented outside the blind-spots, looking for a Gabor stimulus without a small orthogonal inset...
May 16, 2017: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28495597/the-learned-reinterpretation-of-fluency-in-amnesia
#19
Marie Geurten, Sylvie Willems
Fluency is one of many cues that are involved in memory decisions. To date, however, the extent to which fluency-based decisions are preserved in amnesia is not yet clear. In this study, we tested and found differences in how patients with amnesia (n=8) and control participants (n=16) use fluency when making recognition decisions (Experiment 1). Our results suggested that these differences could be due to changes in the readiness with which patients attribute the subjective feeling of fluency to pre-exposure when an alternative explanation is available (i...
May 8, 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28490500/the-wisdom-of-crowds-for-visual-search
#20
Mordechai Z Juni, Miguel P Eckstein
Decision-making accuracy typically increases through collective integration of people's judgments into group decisions, a phenomenon known as the wisdom of crowds. For simple perceptual laboratory tasks, classic signal detection theory specifies the upper limit for collective integration benefits obtained by weighted averaging of people's confidences, and simple majority voting can often approximate that limit. Life-critical perceptual decisions often involve searching large image data (e.g., medical, security, and aerial imagery), but the expected benefits and merits of using different pooling algorithms are unknown for such tasks...
May 23, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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