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perceptual decision making

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28813350/anxiety-and-performance-perceptual-motor-behavior-in-high-pressure-contexts
#1
REVIEW
Arne Nieuwenhuys, Raôul Rd Oudejans
When the pressure is on and anxiety levels increase it is not easy to perform well. In search of mechanisms explaining the anxiety-performance relationship, we revisit the integrated model of anxiety and perceptual-motor performance (Nieuwenhuys and Oudejans, 2012) and provide a critical review of contemporary literature. While there is increasing evidence that changes in attentional control affect the execution of goal-directed action, based on our model and emerging evidence from different scientific disciplines, we argue for a more integrated, process-based approach...
August 2017: Current Opinion in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812307/the-development-of-perceptual-averaging-learning-what-to-do-not-just-how-to-do-it
#2
Pete R Jones, Tessa M Dekker
The mature visual system condenses complex scenes into simple summary statistics (e.g., average size, location, orientation, etc.). However, children, often perform poorly on perceptual averaging tasks. Children's difficulties are typically thought to represent the suboptimal implementation of an adult-like strategy. This paper examines another possibility: that children actually make decisions in a qualitatively different way to adults (optimal implementation of a non-ideal strategy). Ninety children (6-7, 8-9, 10-11 years) and 30 adults were asked to locate the middle of randomly generated dot-clouds...
August 15, 2017: Developmental Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28777728/rat-prefrontal-cortex-inactivations-during-decision-making-are-explained-by-bistable-attractor-dynamics
#3
Alex T Piet, Jeffrey C Erlich, Charles D Kopec, Carlos D Brody
Two-node attractor networks are flexible models for neural activity during decision making. Depending on the network configuration, these networks can model distinct aspects of decisions including evidence integration, evidence categorization, and decision memory. Here, we use attractor networks to model recent causal perturbations of the frontal orienting fields (FOF) in rat cortex during a perceptual decision-making task (Erlich, Brunton, Duan, Hanks, & Brody, 2015). We focus on a striking feature of the perturbation results...
August 4, 2017: Neural Computation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28772104/the-role-of-the-lateral-intraparietal-area-in-the-study-of-decision-making
#4
Alexander C Huk, Leor N Katz, Jacob L Yates
Over the past two decades, neurophysiological responses in the lateral intraparietal area (LIP) have received extensive study for insight into decision making. In a parallel manner, inferred cognitive processes have enriched interpretations of LIP activity. Because of this bidirectional interplay between physiology and cognition, LIP has served as fertile ground for developing quantitative models that link neural activity with decision making. These models stand as some of the most important frameworks for linking brain and mind, and they are now mature enough to be evaluated in finer detail and integrated with other lines of investigation of LIP function...
July 25, 2017: Annual Review of Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28768151/tuned-by-experience-how-orientation-probability-modulates-early-perceptual-processing
#5
Syaheed B Jabar, Alex Filipowicz, Britt Anderson
Probable stimuli are more often and more quickly detected. While stimulus probability is known to affect decision-making, it can also be explained as a perceptual phenomenon. Using spatial gratings, we have previously shown that probable orientations are also more precisely estimated, even while participants remained naive to the manipulation. We conducted an electrophysiological study to investigate the effect that probability has on perception and visual-evoked potentials. In line with previous studies on oddballs and stimulus prevalence, low-probability orientations were associated with a greater late positive 'P300' component which might be related to either surprise or decision-making...
September 2017: Vision Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28758998/functional-dissection-of-signal-and-noise-in-mt-and-lip-during-decision-making
#6
Jacob L Yates, Il Memming Park, Leor N Katz, Jonathan W Pillow, Alexander C Huk
During perceptual decision-making, responses in the middle temporal (MT) and lateral intraparietal (LIP) areas appear to map onto theoretically defined quantities, with MT representing instantaneous motion evidence and LIP reflecting the accumulated evidence. However, several aspects of the transformation between the two areas have not been empirically tested. We therefore performed multistage systems identification analyses of the simultaneous activity of MT and LIP during individual decisions. We found that monkeys based their choices on evidence presented in early epochs of the motion stimulus and that substantial early weighting of motion was present in MT responses...
July 24, 2017: Nature Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28756951/piercing-of-consciousness-as-a-threshold-crossing-operation
#7
Yul H R Kang, Frederike H Petzschner, Daniel M Wolpert, Michael N Shadlen
Many decisions arise through an accumulation of evidence to a terminating threshold. The process, termed bounded evidence accumulation (or drift diffusion), provides a unified account of decision speed and accuracy, and it is supported by neurophysiology in human and animal models. In many situations, a decision maker may not communicate a decision immediately and yet feel that at some point she had made up her mind. We hypothesized that this occurs when an accumulation of evidence reaches a termination threshold, registered, subjectively, as an "aha" moment...
August 7, 2017: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28747627/metacognitive-impairments-extend-perceptual-decision-making-weaknesses-in-compulsivity
#8
Tobias U Hauser, Micah Allen, Geraint Rees, Raymond J Dolan
Awareness of one's own abilities is of paramount importance in adaptive decision making. Psychotherapeutic theories assume such metacognitive insight is impaired in compulsivity, though this is supported by scant empirical evidence. In this study, we investigate metacognitive abilities in compulsive participants using computational models, where these enable a segregation between metacognitive and perceptual decision making impairments. We examined twenty low-compulsive and twenty high-compulsive participants, recruited from a large population-based sample, and matched for other psychiatric and cognitive dimensions...
July 26, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28747465/unbounded-evidence-accumulation-characterizes-subjective-visual-vertical-svv-forced-choice-perceptual-choice-and-confidence
#9
Koeun Lim, Wei Wang, Daniel M Merfeld
Humans can subjectively yet quantitatively assess choice confidence based on perceptual precision even when a perceptual decision is made without an immediate reward or feedback. However, surprisingly little is known about choice confidence. Here we investigate the dynamics of choice confidence by merging two parallel conceptual frameworks of decision-making, signal detection theory and sequential analyses (i.e., drift diffusion modeling). Specifically, in order to capture end-point statistics of binary choice and confidence, we built on a previous study that defined choice confidence in terms of psychophysics derived from signal detection theory...
July 26, 2017: Journal of Neurophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28732659/eye-tracking-measures-of-uncertainty-during-perceptual-decision-making
#10
Tad T Brunyé, Aaron L Gardony
Perceptual decision making involves gathering and interpreting sensory information to effectively categorize the world and inform behavior. For instance, a radiologist distinguishing the presence versus absence of a tumor, or a luggage screener categorizing objects as threatening or non-threatening. In many cases, sensory information is not sufficient to reliably disambiguate the nature of a stimulus, and resulting decisions are done under conditions of uncertainty. The present study asked whether several oculomotor metrics might prove sensitive to transient states of uncertainty during perceptual decision making...
July 18, 2017: International Journal of Psychophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28723947/the-effect-of-order-of-dwells-on-the-first-dwell-gaze-bias-for-eventually-chosen-items
#11
Takuya Onuma, Yuwadee Penwannakul, Jun Fuchimoto, Nobuyuki Sakai
The relationship between choice and eye movement has gained marked interest. The gaze bias effect, i.e., the tendency to look longer at items that are eventually chosen, has been shown to occur in the first dwell (initial cohesion of fixations for an item). In the two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) paradigm, participants would look at one of the items first (defined as first look; FL), and they would then move and look at another item (second look; SL). This study investigated how the order in which the chosen items were looked at modulates the first dwell gaze bias effect...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28699831/motivated-malleability-frontal-cortical-asymmetry-predicts-the-susceptibility-to-social-influence
#12
Robert Schnuerch, Stefan Pfattheicher
Humans, just as many other animals, regulate their behavior in terms of approaching stimuli associated with pleasure and avoiding stimuli linked to harm. A person's current and chronic motivational direction-that is, approach versus avoidance orientation-is reliably reflected in the asymmetry of frontal cortical low-frequency oscillations. Using resting electroencephalography (EEG), we show that frontal asymmetry is predictive of the tendency to yield to social influence: Stronger right- than left-side frontolateral activation during a resting-state session prior to the experiment was robustly associated with a stronger inclination to adopt a peer group's judgments during perceptual decision-making (Study 1)...
July 12, 2017: Social Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28692700/noise-multisensory-integration-and-previous-response-in-perceptual-disambiguation
#13
Cesare V Parise, Marc O Ernst
Sensory information about the state of the world is generally ambiguous. Understanding how the nervous system resolves such ambiguities to infer the actual state of the world is a central quest for sensory neuroscience. However, the computational principles of perceptual disambiguation are still poorly understood: What drives perceptual decision-making between multiple equally valid solutions? Here we investigate how humans gather and combine sensory information-within and across modalities-to disambiguate motion perception in an ambiguous audiovisual display, where two moving stimuli could appear as either streaming through, or bouncing off each other...
July 2017: PLoS Computational Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28688073/the-integration-of-occlusion-and-disparity-information-for-judging-depth-in-autism-spectrum-disorder
#14
Danielle Smith, Danielle Ropar, Harriet A Allen
In autism spectrum disorder (ASD), atypical integration of visual depth cues may be due to flattened perceptual priors or selective fusion. The current study attempts to disentangle these explanations by psychophysically assessing within-modality integration of ordinal (occlusion) and metric (disparity) depth cues while accounting for sensitivity to stereoscopic information. Participants included 22 individuals with ASD and 23 typically developing matched controls. Although adults with ASD were found to have significantly poorer stereoacuity, they were still able to automatically integrate conflicting depth cues, lending support to the idea that priors are intact in ASD...
July 7, 2017: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28681758/basal-ganglia-their-role-in-complex-cognitive-procedures-in-experimental-models-and-in-clinical-practice
#15
Rita Moretti, Paola Caruso, Elena Crisman, Silvia Gazzin
Apart from the well known role of the basal ganglia (BG) in motor control, their important role in regulating the cognitive functions is emerging. This article traces the scientific work that explores this role of BG in reinforcement learning, perceptual decision making, and other nonmotor pathways (speech fluency, cognition, attention and behaviour). It also highlights the important role played by the BG networks in determining the development of a child's brain. It retraces the various pathways and connections of the BG with the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and other regions that may be utilized in the establishment of complex cognitive procedures...
July 2017: Neurology India
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28673881/a-multimodal-encoding-model-applied-to-imaging-decision-related-neural-cascades-in-the-human-brain
#16
REVIEW
Jordan Muraskin, Truman R Brown, Jennifer M Walz, Tao Tu, Bryan Conroy, Robin I Goldman, Paul Sajda
Perception and cognition in the brain are naturally characterized as spatiotemporal processes. Decision-making, for example, depends on coordinated patterns of neural activity cascading across the brain, running in time from stimulus to response and in space from primary sensory regions to the frontal lobe. Measuring this cascade is key to developing an understanding of brain function. Here we report on a novel methodology that employs multi-modal imaging for inferring this cascade in humans at unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution...
June 30, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28669719/changing-similarity-stable-and-flexible-modulations-of-psychological-dimensions
#17
Michael Dieciuc, Nelson A Roque, Jonathan R Folstein
Successfully categorizing objects requires discriminating between relevant and irrelevant dimensions (e.g., shape, color). Categorization can lead to changes in the visual system that stretch psychological space, making relevant dimensions more distinct and irrelevant dimensions more similar. These changes are known as dimensional modulation (DM) and they can be both stable and flexible in nature. The current study examined the interaction between stable DM and flexible DM, as well as the time course of relative changes in similarity...
June 29, 2017: Brain Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28668981/implicit-valuation-of-the-near-miss-is-dependent-on-outcome-context
#18
Parker J Banks, Matthew S Tata, Patrick J Bennett, Allison B Sekuler, Aaron J Gruber
Gambling studies have described a "near-miss effect" wherein the experience of almost winning increases gambling persistence. The near-miss has been proposed to inflate the value of preceding actions through its perceptual similarity to wins. We demonstrate here, however, that it acts as a conditioned stimulus to positively or negatively influence valuation, dependent on reward expectation and cognitive engagement. When subjects are asked to choose between two simulated slot machines, near-misses increase valuation of machines with a low payout rate, whereas they decrease valuation of high payout machines...
July 1, 2017: Journal of Gambling Studies
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28648171/breaking-down-hierarchies-of-decision-making-in-primates
#19
Alexandre Hyafil, Rubén Moreno-Bote
Possible options in a decision often organize as a hierarchy of subdecisions. A recent study concluded that perceptual processes in primates mimic this hierarchical structure and perform subdecisions in parallel. We argue that a flat model that directly selects between final choices accounts more parsimoniously for the reported behavioral and neural data. Critically, a flat model is characterized by decision signals integrating evidence at different hierarchical levels, in agreement with neural recordings showing this integration in localized neural populations...
June 26, 2017: ELife
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28635378/people-with-autism-spectrum-conditions-make-more-consistent-decisions
#20
George D Farmer, Simon Baron-Cohen, William J Skylark
People with autism spectrum conditions (ASC) show reduced sensitivity to contextual stimuli in many perceptual and cognitive tasks. We investigated whether this also applies to decision making by examining adult participants' choices between pairs of consumer products that were presented with a third, less desirable "decoy" option. Participants' preferences between the items in a given pair frequently switched when the third item in the set was changed, but this tendency was reduced among individuals with ASC, which indicated that their choices were more consistent and conventionally rational than those of control participants...
August 2017: Psychological Science
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