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bacterias genome

Li Fang, Qiong Chen, Keren Shi, Xi Li, Qiucheng Shi, Fang He, Jiancang Zhou, Yunsong Yu, Xiaoting Hua
Klebsiella pneumoniae is a gram-negative bacterium that causes numerous diseases, including pneumonia and urinary tract infections. An increase in multidrug resistance has complicated the treatment of these bacterial infections, and although tigecycline shows activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria, resistant strains have emerged. In this study, the whole genomes of two clinical and six laboratory-evolved strains were sequenced to identify putative mutations related to tigecycline resistance. Of seven tigecycline-resistant strains, seven (100%) had ramR mutations, five (71...
2016: PloS One
Kazuo Kobayashi, Yu Kanesaki, Hirofumi Yoshikawa
Bacteria have developed various motility mechanisms to adapt to a variety of solid surfaces. A rhizosphere isolate, Paenibacillus sp. NAIST15-1, exhibited unusual motility behavior. When spotted onto 1.5% agar media, Paenibacillus sp. formed many colonies, each of which moved around actively at a speed of 3.6 μm/sec. As their density increased, each moving colony began to spiral, finally forming a static round colony. Despite its unusual motility behavior, draft genome sequencing revealed that both the composition and organization of flagellar genes in Paenibacillus sp...
October 2016: PLoS Genetics
Jing-Jing Khoo, Fang-Shiang Lim, Fezshin Chen, Wai-Hong Phoon, Chee-Sieng Khor, Brian L Pike, Li-Yen Chang, Sazaly AbuBakar
Recent studies have shown that ticks harbor Coxiella-like bacteria, which are potentially tick-specific endosymbionts. We recently described the detection of Coxiella-like bacteria and possibly Coxiella burnetii in ticks found from rural areas in Malaysia. In the present study, we collected ticks, including Haemaphysalis bispinosa, Haemaphysalis hystricis, Dermacentor compactus, Dermacentor steini, and Amblyomma sp. from wildlife and domesticated goats from four different locations in Malaysia. Coxiella 16s rRNA genomic sequences were detected by PCR in 89% of ticks tested...
October 20, 2016: Vector Borne and Zoonotic Diseases
Abhishek Srivastava, Katherine D McMahon, Ramunas Stepanauskas, Hans-Peter Grossart
The National Center for Biotechnology Information [] database enlists more than 15,500 bacterial species. But this also includes a plethora of uncultured bacterial representations. Owing to their metabolism, they directly influence biogeochemical cycles, which underscores the the important status of bacteria on our planet. To study the function of a gene from an uncultured bacterium, we have undertaken a de novo gene synthesis approach. Actinobacteria of the acI-B subcluster are important but yet uncultured members of the bacterioplankton in temperate lakes of the northern hemisphere such as oligotrophic Lake Stechlin (NE Germany)...
December 2015: International Microbiology: the Official Journal of the Spanish Society for Microbiology
Kai Tang, Yujie Yang, Dan Lin, Shuhui Li, Wenchu Zhou, Yu Han, Keshao Liu, Nianzhi Jiao
Roseobacter clade bacteria are ubiquitous in marine environments and now thought to be significant contributors to carbon and sulfur cycling. However, only a few strains of roseobacters have been isolated from the deep-sea water column and have not been thoroughly investigated. Here, we present the complete genomes of phylogentically closed related Thiobacimonas profunda JLT2016 and Pelagibaca abyssi JLT2014 isolated from deep-sea water of the Southeastern Pacific. The genome sequences showed that the two deep-sea roseobacters carry genes for versatile metabolisms with functional capabilities such as ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase-mediated carbon fixation and inorganic sulfur oxidation...
October 20, 2016: Scientific Reports
Christopher J Day, Rebecca M King, Lucy K Shewell, Greg Tram, Tahria Najnin, Lauren E Hartley-Tassell, Jennifer C Wilson, Aaron D Fleetwood, Igor B Zhulin, Victoria Korolik
A rare chemotaxis receptor, Tlp11, has been previously identified in invasive strains of Campylobacter jejuni, the most prevalent cause of bacterial gastroenteritis worldwide. Here we use glycan and small-molecule arrays, as well as surface plasmon resonance, to show that Tlp11 specifically interacts with galactose. Tlp11 is required for the chemotactic response of C. jejuni to galactose, as shown using wild type, allelic inactivation and addition mutants. The inactivated mutant displays reduced virulence in vivo, in a model of chicken colonization...
October 20, 2016: Nature Communications
Laure D Sultan, Daria Mileshina, Felix Grewe, Katarzyna Rolle, Sivan Abudraham, Paweł Głodowicz, Adnan Khan Niazi, Ido Keren, Sofia Shevtsov, Liron Klipcan, Jan Barciszewski, Jeffrey P Mower, Andre Dietrich, Oren Ostersetzer
Group II introns are large catalytic RNAs that are ancestrally related to nuclear spliceosomal introns. Sequences corresponding to group II RNAs are found in many prokaryotes and are particularly prevalent within plants organellar genomes. Proteins encoded within the introns themselves (maturases) facilitate the splicing of their own host pre-RNAs. Mitochondrial introns in plants have diverged considerably in sequence and have lost their maturases. In angiosperms, only a single maturase has been retained in the mitochondrial DNA: the matR gene found within NADH dehydrogenase 1 (nad1) intron 4...
October 19, 2016: Plant Cell
Awa Diop, Saber Khelaifia, Nicholas Armstrong, Noémie Labas, Pierre-Edouard Fournier, Didier Raoult, Matthieu Million
BACKGROUND: Microbial culturomics represents an ongoing revolution in the characterization of environmental and human microbiome. METHODS: By using three media containing high salt concentration (100, 150, and 200 g/L), the halophilic microbial culturome of a commercial table salt was determined. RESULTS: Eighteen species belonging to the Terrabacteria group were isolated including eight moderate halophilic and 10 halotolerant bacteria. Gracilibacillus massiliensis sp...
2016: Microbial Ecology in Health and Disease
Pooja Gopal, Michelle Yee, Jickky Sarathy, Jian Liang Low, Jansy P Sarathy, Firat Kaya, Véronique Dartois, Martin Gengenbacher, Thomas Dick
Pyrazinamide (PZA) is a critical component of first- and second-line treatments of tuberculosis (TB), yet its mechanism of action largely remains an enigma. We carried out a genetic screen to isolate Mycobacterium bovis BCG mutants resistant to pyrazinoic acid (POA), the bioactive derivative of PZA, followed by whole genome sequencing of 26 POA resistant strains. Rather than finding mutations in the proposed candidate targets fatty acid synthase I and ribosomal protein S1, we found resistance conferring mutations in two pathways: missense mutations in aspartate decarboxylase panD, involved in the synthesis of the essential acyl carrier coenzyme A (CoA), and frameshift mutations in the vitro nonessential polyketide synthase genes mas and ppsA-E, involved in the synthesis of the virulence factor phthiocerol dimycocerosate (PDIM)...
September 9, 2016: ACS Infectious Diseases
Tetsuo Kubota, Hajime Matsushita, Takeo Tomita, Saori Kosono, Minoru Yoshida, Tomohisa Kuzuyama, Makoto Nishiyama
Regulation of amino acid metabolism (RAM) domains are widely distributed among prokaryotes. In most cases, a RAM domain fuses with a DNA-binding domain to act as a transcriptional regulator. The extremely thermophilic bacterium, Thermus thermophilus, only carries a single gene encoding a RAM domain-containing protein on its genome. This protein is a stand-alone RAM domain protein (SraA) lacking a DNA-binding domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that SraA, which senses amino acids through its RAM domain, may interact with other proteins to modify its functions...
October 19, 2016: Extremophiles: Life Under Extreme Conditions
Ia Kusradze, Natia Karumidze, Sophio Rigvava, Teona Dvalidze, Malkhaz Katsitadze, Irakli Amiranashvili, Marina Goderdzishvili
Acinetobacter baumannii is a gram-negative, non-motile bacterium that, due to its multidrug resistance, has become a major nosocomial pathogen. The increasing number of multidrug resistant (MDR) strains has renewed interest in phage therapy. The aim of our study was to assess the effectiveness of phage administration in Acinetobacter baumannii wound infections in an animal model to demonstrate phage therapy as non-toxic, safe and alternative antibacterial remedy. Using classical methods for the study of bacteriophage properties, we characterized phage vB-GEC_Ab-M-G7 as a dsDNA myovirus with a 90 kb genome size...
2016: Frontiers in Microbiology
Jeremy B Yoder
Decades of research on the evolution of mutualism has generated a wealth of possible ways whereby mutually beneficial interactions between species persist in spite of the apparent advantages to individuals that accept the benefits of mutualism without reciprocating - but identifying how any particular empirical system is stabilized against cheating remains challenging. Different hypothesized models of mutualism stability predict different forms of coevolutionary selection, and emerging high-throughput sequencing methods allow examination of the selective histories of mutualism genes and, thereby, the form of selection acting on those genes...
October 18, 2016: American Journal of Botany
Erica L Heipertz, Jourdan Harper, Wendy E Walker
IFN regulatory factor (IRF)3 plays a detrimental role in the cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) mouse model of sepsis. However, it is unclear which pathway activates IRF3 in this context. In this report we investigate two pathways that activate IRF3: the Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING) pathway (which senses cytosolic DNA) and the TIR-domain-containing adapter-inducing interferon-β (TRIF) pathway (which sense dsRNA and LPS via Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 and 4). Initially, we examine the impact of these pathways using a severe CLP model (∼90% mortality)...
October 17, 2016: Shock
Yanhua Cui, Tingting Xu, Xiaojun Qu, Tong Hu, Xu Jiang, Chunyu Zhao
Streptococcus thermophilus is one of the most valuable homo-fermentative lactic acid bacteria, which, for a long time, has been widely used as a starter for the production of fermented dairy products. The key production characteristics of S. thermophilus, for example the production of extracellular polysaccharide, proteolytic enzymes and flavor substances as well as acidifying capacity etc., have an important effect on the quality of dairy products. The acidification capacity of the strains determines the manufacturing time and quality of dairy products...
October 12, 2016: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Yizhi Song, Anne-Kristin Kaster, John Vollmers, Yanqing Song, Paul A Davison, Martinique Frentrup, Gail M Preston, Ian P Thompson, J Colin Murrell, Huabing Yin, C Neil Hunter, Wei E Huang
Cell sorting coupled with single-cell genomics is a powerful tool to circumvent cultivation of microorganisms and reveal microbial 'dark matter'. Single-cell Raman spectra (SCRSs) are label-free biochemical 'fingerprints' of individual cells, which can link the sorted cells to their phenotypic information and ecological functions. We employed a novel Raman-activated cell ejection (RACE) approach to sort single bacterial cells from a water sample in the Red Sea based on SCRS. Carotenoids are highly diverse pigments and play an important role in phototrophic bacteria, giving strong and distinctive Raman spectra...
October 17, 2016: Microbial Biotechnology
Stefanie P Glaeser, Swapnil Doijad, Muaz Hijazin, Trinad Chakraborty, Enevold Falsen, Val Hall, Peter Kämpfer
During the years 1994-2011 five strictly anaerobic, Gram-stain-positive, diphtheroid bacteria (strains CCUG 31793(T), CCUG 44221, CCUG 61255, CCUG 45114, and CCUG 44993) were isolated from different clinical samples in Sweden and the United Kingdom. Comparative analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences showed that the five strains shared 99-100% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity among each other and 98.3-98.6% sequence similarity to Varibaculum cambriense DSM 15806(T). Genomic fingerprint patterns generated with ERIC-, BOX-, and RAPD-PCR, and whole genome sequence (WGS) based comparison by in silico DNA-DNA hybridization (isDDH), average nucleotide identity (ANI) analysis and six housekeeping gene (atpA, rpoB, pgi, metG, gltA and gyrA) based multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) showed that the strains could be differentiated from V...
September 20, 2016: Systematic and Applied Microbiology
Teija Ojala, Pia K S Laine, Terhi Ahlroos, Jarna Tanskanen, Saara Pitkänen, Tuomas Salusjärvi, Matti Kankainen, Soile Tynkkynen, Lars Paulin, Petri Auvinen
Propionibacterium freudenreichii is a commercially important bacterium that is essential for the development of the characteristic eyes and flavor of Swiss-type cheeses. These bacteria grow actively and produce large quantities of flavor compounds during cheese ripening at warm temperatures but also appear to contribute to the aroma development during the subsequent cold storage of cheese. Here, we advance our understanding of the role of P. freudenreichii in cheese ripening by presenting the 2.68-Mbp annotated genome sequence of P...
September 26, 2016: International Journal of Food Microbiology
Jia-Yun C Tsai, Jacelyn M S Loh, Fiona Clow, Natalie Lorenz, Thomas Proft
Group A Streptococcus (GAS), or Streptococcus pyogenes, is a human pathogen that causes diseases ranging from skin and soft tissue infections to severe invasive diseases, such as toxic shock syndrome. Each GAS strain carries a particular pilus type encoded in the variable fibronectin-binding, collagen-binding, T antigen (FCT) genomic region. Here we describe the functional analysis of the serotype M2 pilus encoded in the FCT-6 region. We found that, in contrast to other investigated GAS pili, the ancillary pilin 1 lacks adhesive properties...
October 14, 2016: Molecular Microbiology
Nurdan Tözün, Eser Vardareli
Gastrointestinal (GI) cancers are the leading cause of mortality worldwide. These cancers are the end result of a complex interplay between gene and environment. Bacteria, parasites, and viruses have been implicated in some cancers. Recent data have put at focus the gut microbiome as the key player firing tumorigenesis. Experimental and human studies have provided evidence on the role of microbiota in cancer development. Although subject to changes in different settings such as antibiotic treatment, diet or lifestyle, our microbiome is quite stable and is capable of increasing susceptibility to cancer or decrease and halt its progression...
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Chiara Valsecchi, Sara Carlotta Tagliacarne, Annamaria Castellazzi
Intestinal microbiota is composed by symbiotic innocuous bacteria and potential pathogens also called pathobionts. The human gut normally hosts roughly 1014 bacterial organisms of up to 1000 different species. The genome size of this microbial organ, collectively named microbiome, exceeds the size of the human nuclear genome by 2 orders of magnitude.
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
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