keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Tortoise

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28331618/movement-of-leopard-tortoises-in-response-to-environmental-and-climatic-variables-in-a-semi-arid-environment
#1
Martyn Drabik-Hamshare, Colleen T Downs
BACKGROUND: Tortoises (Testudinidae) occur in a wide range of environments, providing important ecosystem functions, such as seed dispersal and refuge in the form of burrows. Tortoise movement has previously been shown to be related to resource availability, reproductive status and local environmental conditions. However, understanding of the variables that drive their movement remains comparatively low. We investigated aspects of movement in leopard tortoises Stigmochelys pardalis-the largest and most abundant tortoise species in sub-Saharan Africa-in response to environmental, climatic and individual variables in the semi-arid Karoo, South Africa...
2017: Movement Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28327883/chapiniella-variabilis-nematoda-parasitizing-chelonoidis-carbonarius-and-c-denticulatus-testudinidae-in-the-state-of-piau%C3%A3
#2
Simone Mousinho Freire, Anangela Ravena da Silva Leal, Marcelo Knoff, Delir Corrêa Gomes, Jeannie Nascimento Dos Santos, Elane Guerreiro Giese, Reinaldo José da Silva, Ivete Lopes Mendonça
Chapiniella variabilis (Chapin, 1924), a strongylid nematode, was collected parasitizing the large intestine of the tortoises Chelonoidis carbonarius (Spix, 1824) (Cc) and C. denticulatus (Linnaeus, 1766) (Cd) in the Zoobotanical Park of the municipality of Teresina, state of Piauí, Brazil. The taxonomic identification was based on morphological and morphometric features, using bright-field and scanning electron microscopy. The present study adds new observations on the morphology, mainly relating to the mouth papillae, external and internal leaf-crown elements, excretory pore, deirids and male and female posterior end...
March 16, 2017: Revista Brasileira de Parasitologia Veterinária, Brazilian Journal of Veterinary Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28316068/contribution-by-vertebrates-to-seed-dispersal-effectiveness-in-the-gal%C3%A3-pagos-islands-a-community-wide-approach
#3
M Nogales, A González-Castro, B Rumeu, A Traveset, P Vargas, P Jaramillo, J M Olesen, R Heleno
Seed dispersal and seedling recruitment are crucial phases in the life cycle of all spermatophyte plants. The net contribution of seed dispersers to plant establishment is known as seed dispersal effectiveness (SDE) and is defined as the product of a quantitative (number of seeds dispersed) and a qualitative (probability of recruitment) component. In Galápagos, we studied the direct contribution to SDE (number of seeds dispersed and effect on seedling emergence) provided by the five island groups of frugivores (giant tortoises, lizards, medium-sized passerine birds, small non-finch passerine birds and finches) in the two main habitats in this archipelago: the lowland and the highland zones, and found 16 vertebrate species dispersing 58 plant species...
March 17, 2017: Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28281776/parasites-of-domestic-and-wild-animals-in-south-africa-li-ticks-infesting-leopard-tortoises-i-stigmochelys-pardalis-i-hingeback-tortoises-i-kinixys-zombensis-i-and-angulate-tortoises-i-chersina-angulata-i
#4
Ivan G Horak, Ashley Pearcy, Kyle J Lloyd
The objective of the study was to record the tick species collected from three species of tortoise, each in a different province of South Africa. Ticks were collected from leopard tortoises, Stigmochyles pardalis, in the southern region of the Kruger National Park, Mpumalanga province; from hingeback tortoises, Kinixys zombensis, in the Enseleni Nature Reserve, KwaZulu-Natal province and from angulate tortoises, Chersina angulata, in the West Coast National Park, Western Cape province. Of the 63 leopard tortoises examined, 58 were infested with Amblyomma marmoreum and 49 with Amblyomma hebraeum, and all stages of development of both species were recovered...
February 28, 2017: Onderstepoort Journal of Veterinary Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28273135/low-tortoise-abundances-in-pine-forest-plantations-in-forest-shrubland-transition-areas
#5
Roberto C Rodríguez-Caro, Cornelia S Oedekoven, Eva Graciá, José D Anadón, Stephen T Buckland, Miguel A Esteve-Selma, Julia Martinez, Andrés Giménez
In the transition between Mediterranean forest and the arid subtropical shrublands of the southeastern Iberian Peninsula, humans have transformed habitat since ancient times. Understanding the role of the original mosaic landscapes in wildlife species and the effects of the current changes as pine forest plantations, performed even outside the forest ecological boundaries, are important conservation issues. We studied variation in the density of the endangered spur-thighed tortoise (Testudo graeca) in three areas that include the four most common land types within the species' range (pine forests, natural shrubs, dryland crop fields, and abandoned crop fields)...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28238545/drawing-a-line-in-the-sand-effectiveness-of-off-highway-vehicle-management-in-california-s-sonoran-desert
#6
Nathan A Custer, Lesley A DeFalco, Kenneth E Nussear, Todd C Esque
Public land policies manage multiple uses while striving to protect vulnerable plant and wildlife habitats from degradation; yet the effectiveness of such policies are infrequently evaluated, particularly for remote landscapes that are difficult to monitor. We assessed the use and impacts of recreational vehicles on Mojave Desert washes (intermittent streams) in the Chemehuevi Desert Wildlife Management Area (DWMA) of southern California. Wash zones designated as open and closed to off-highway vehicle (OHV) activity were designed in part to protect Mojave desert tortoise (Gopherus agassizii) habitat while allowing recreation in designated areas...
May 15, 2017: Journal of Environmental Management
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28171733/microsporidiosis-in-four-tortoises-testudo-hermanni-boettgeri
#7
M Eydner, J Donhauser, A Beineke, P Guenther, S Blahak
Microsporidia are obligate intracellular, spore-forming fungi. A wide range of vertebrate and invertebrate hosts can be infected; however, cases of infected turtles or tortoises have not yet been described. This is the first description of 4 cases in tortoises ( Testudo spp), which showed general signs of illness as well as intestinal and respiratory signs until death occurred or they were euthanized. Granulomatous and necrotizing inflammation was visible in the lung and liver. Fungal organisms were present in heart blood, lung, liver, and intestine...
January 1, 2017: Veterinary Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28169185/reproductive-medicine-in-freshwater-turtles-and-land-tortoises
#8
REVIEW
Sean M Perry, Mark A Mitchell
Chelonian reproductive medicine is an extremely important facet to ensuring captive populations for the pet trade and conservation efforts around the globe. This review covers basic chelonian reproductive anatomy and physiology, natural history, behavior, and sexing chelonians, in addition to discussing reproductive disorders that are commonly seen by veterinarians. Reproductive disorders covered include infertility, dystocia, follicular stasis, egg yolk coelomitis, phallus prolapse, and reproductive neoplasia...
February 4, 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Exotic Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28148835/long-term-memory-of-relative-reward-values
#9
Francesca Soldati, Oliver H P Burman, Elizabeth A John, Thomas W Pike, Anna Wilkinson
Long-term memory can be adaptive as it allows animals to retain information that is crucial for survival, such as the appearance and location of key resources. This is generally examined by comparing choices of stimuli that have value to the animal with those that do not; however, in nature choices are rarely so clear cut. Animals are able to assess the relative value of a resource via direct comparison, but it remains unclear whether they are able to retain this information for a biologically meaningful amount of time...
February 2017: Biology Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28123109/one-foot-out-the-door-limb-function-during-swimming-in-terrestrial-versus-aquatic-turtles
#10
Vanessa K Hilliard Young, Kaitlyn G Vest, Angela R V Rivera, Nora R Espinoza, Richard W Blob
Specialization for a new habitat often entails a cost to performance in the ancestral habitat. Although aquatic lifestyles are ancestral among extant cryptodiran turtles, multiple lineages, including tortoises (Testudinidae) and emydid box turtles (genus Terrapene), independently specialized for terrestrial habitats. To what extent is swimming function retained in such lineages despite terrestrial specialization? Because tortoises diverged from other turtles over 50 Ma, but box turtles did so only 5 Ma, we hypothesized that swimming kinematics for box turtles would more closely resemble those of aquatic relatives than those of tortoises...
January 2017: Biology Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28121010/an-updated-description-of-the-osteology-of-the-pancake-tortoise-malacochersus-tornieri-testudines-testudinidae-with-special-focus-on-intraspecific-variation
#11
Anna-Katharina Mautner, Ashley E Latimer, Uwe Fritz, Torsten M Scheyer
Exceptional variability in the shell of the pancake tortoise Malacochersus tornieri, both in the keratinous surficial scutes and the underlying bones, in addition to its remarkably fenestrated bony shell are unique among tortoises. Based on 14 individuals of different sizes and ages, the observed variation in M. tornieri was described in detail, with additional notes on the typically testudinid skull, inner ear and brain endocast using microCT-scan data, as well as the limbs. Similar degrees of variation have not yet been described in any other extant turtle species and therefore seem notable in M...
January 25, 2017: Journal of Morphology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28089032/rule-of-three-for-esophageal-dilation-like-the-tortoise-versus-the-rabbit-low-and-slow-is-our-friend-and-our-patients-win
#12
EDITORIAL
Joel E Richter
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28080924/selected-plasma-biochemistry-analytes-of-healthy-captive-sulcata-african-spurred-tortoises-centrochelys-sulcata
#13
David Eshar, Ady Y Gancz, Nili Avni-Magen, Effi Wagshal, Lisa M Pohlman, Mark A Mitchell
The sulcata or African spurred tortoise (Centrochelys sulcata) is a large tortoise species that is commonly kept in zoologic collections and as a pet. The objectives of this study were to establish reference intervals for selected biochemical analytes in clinically healthy captive sulcata tortoises and to evaluate the impact of blood sampling site and sex. Blood samples were collected from 60 tortoises from either the dorsal coccygeal (tail) vein or the subcarapacial venous plexus based on their body size. The packed cell volume and refractometric total solids (TS) were determined...
December 2016: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077774/tropical-ancient-dna-reveals-relationships-of-the-extinct-bahamian-giant-tortoise-chelonoidis-alburyorum
#14
Christian Kehlmaier, Axel Barlow, Alexander K Hastings, Melita Vamberger, Johanna L A Paijmans, David W Steadman, Nancy A Albury, Richard Franz, Michael Hofreiter, Uwe Fritz
Ancient DNA of extinct species from the Pleistocene and Holocene has provided valuable evolutionary insights. However, these are largely restricted to mammals and high latitudes because DNA preservation in warm climates is typically poor. In the tropics and subtropics, non-avian reptiles constitute a significant part of the fauna and little is known about the genetics of the many extinct reptiles from tropical islands. We have reconstructed the near-complete mitochondrial genome of an extinct giant tortoise from the Bahamas (Chelonoidis alburyorum) using an approximately 1 000-year-old humerus from a water-filled sinkhole (blue hole) on Great Abaco Island...
January 11, 2017: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28018649/latitudinal-diversity-gradients-in-mesozoic-non-marine-turtles
#15
David B Nicholson, Patricia A Holroyd, Paul Valdes, Paul M Barrett
The latitudinal biodiversity gradient (LBG)-the pattern of increasing taxonomic richness with decreasing latitude-is prevalent in the structure of the modern biota. However, some freshwater taxa show peak richness at mid-latitudes; for example, extant Testudines (turtles, terrapins and tortoises) exhibit their greatest diversity at 25° N, a pattern sometimes attributed to recent bursts of climatically mediated species diversification. Here, we test whether this pattern also characterizes the Mesozoic distribution of turtles, to determine whether it was established during either their initial diversification or as a more modern phenomenon...
November 2016: Royal Society Open Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27933166/sex-specific-ecophysiological-responses-to-environmental-fluctuations-of-free-ranging-hermann-s-tortoises-implication-for-conservation
#16
Adélaïde Sibeaux, Catherine Louise Michel, Xavier Bonnet, Sébastien Caron, Kévin Fournière, Stephane Gagno, Jean-Marie Ballouard
Physiological parameters provide indicators to evaluate how organisms respond to conservation actions. For example, individuals translocated during reinforcement programmes may not adapt to their novel host environment and may exhibit elevated chronic levels of stress hormones and/or decreasing body condition. Conversely, successful conservation actions should be associated with a lack of detrimental physiological perturbation. However, physiological references fluctuate over time and are influenced by various factors (e...
2016: Conservation Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27922064/ancient-tortoise-hunting-in-the-southwest-pacific
#17
Stuart Hawkins, Trevor H Worthy, Stuart Bedford, Matthew Spriggs, Geoffrey Clark, Geoff Irwin, Simon Best, Patrick Kirch
We report the unprecedented Lapita exploitation and subsequent extinction of large megafauna tortoises (?Meiolania damelipi) on tropical islands during the late Holocene over a 281,000 km(2) region of the southwest Pacific spanning from the Vanuatu archipelago to Viti Levu in Fiji. Zooarchaeological analyses have identified seven early archaeological sites with the remains of this distinctive hornless tortoise, unlike the Gondwanan horned meiolaniid radiation to the southwest. These large tortoise radiations in the Pacific may have contributed to the rapid dispersal of early mobile Neolithic hunters throughout southwest Melanesia and on to western Polynesia...
December 6, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27891620/modulation-of-formalin-induced-pain-related-behaviour-by-clonidine-and-yohimbine-in-the-speke-s-hinged-tortoise-kiniskys-spekii
#18
C M Makau, P K Towett, K S P Abelson, T I Kanui
The study was designed to investigate the involvement of noradrenergic and serotonergic receptor systems in the modulation of formalin-induced pain-related behaviour in the Speke's hinged tortoise. Intradermal injection of 100 μL of formalin at a dilution of 12.5% caused pain-related behaviour (hindlimb withdrawal) that lasted for a mean time of 19.28 min (monophasic response). Intrathecal administration of clonidine (α2 -adrenergic receptor agonist) and yohimbine (α2 -adrenergic receptor antagonist) at a dose of 40 μg/kg and 37...
November 27, 2016: Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27890294/oncology-of-reptiles-diseases-diagnosis-and-treatment
#19
REVIEW
Jane Christman, Michael Devau, Heather Wilson-Robles, Sharman Hoppes, Raquel Rech, Karen E Russell, J Jill Heatley
Based on necropsy review, neoplasia in reptiles has a comparable frequency to that of mammals and birds. Reptile neoplasia is now more frequently diagnosed in clinical practice based on increased use of advanced diagnostic techniques and improvements in reptilian husbandry allowing greater longevity of these species. This article reviews the current literature on neoplasia in reptiles, and focuses on advanced diagnostics and therapeutic options for reptilian patientssuffering neoplastic disease. Although most applied clinical reptile oncology is translated from dog and cat oncology, considerations specific to reptilian patients commonly encountered in clinical practice (turtles, tortoises, snakes, and lizards) are presented...
January 2017: Veterinary Clinics of North America. Exotic Animal Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27827334/cryptosporidium-testudinis-sp-n-cryptosporidium-ducismarci-traversa-2010-and-cryptosporidium-tortoise-genotype-iii-apicomplexa-cryptosporidiidae-in-tortoises
#20
Jana Jezkova, Michaela Horcickova, Lenka Hlaskova, Bohumil Sak, Dana Kvetonova, Jan Novak, Lada Hofmannova, John McEvoy, Martin Kvac
Understanding of the diversity of species of Cryptosporidium Tyzzer, 1910 in tortoises remains incomplete due to the limited number of studies on these hosts. The aim of the present study was to characterise the genetic diversity and biology of cryptosporidia in tortoises of the family Testudinidae Batsch. Faecal samples were individually collected immediately after defecation and were screened for presence of cryptosporidia by microscopy using aniline-carbol-methyl violet staining, and by PCR amplification and sequence analysis targeting the small subunit rRNA (SSU), Cryptosporidium oocyst wall protein (COWP) and actin genes...
October 14, 2016: Folia Parasitologica
keyword
keyword
50280
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"