Read by QxMD icon Read


Gene-Jack Wang, Jizheng Zhao, Dardo Tomasi, Ehsan Shokri Kojori, Ruiliang Wang, Corinde E Wiers, Elisabeth C Caparelli, Nora D Volkow
BACKGROUND: The control of food intake in environments with easy access to highly rewarding foods is challenging to most modern societies. The combination of sustained release (SR) naltrexone and SR bupropion (NB32) has been used in weight-loss and obesity management. However, the effects of NB32 on the brain circuits implicated in the regulation of food intake are unknown. Here we used functional connectivity density (FCD) mapping to evaluate the effects of NB32 on resting brain FC. METHODS: Thirty-six healthy women underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before and after 4-week treatment with NB32 (n = 16) or with placebo (n = 20)...
February 23, 2018: International Journal of Obesity: Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity
Farhana Sakloth, S Stevens Negus
Pharmacotherapy to treat stimulant use disorders continues to be an unmet medical need. Some evidence supports both the role of opioids in mediating abuse-related amphetamine effects and the potential utility of opioid antagonists as therapeutic candidates for treating amphetamine abuse. This study used intracranial self-stimulation (ICSS) to evaluate effects of exposure to and termination of naltrexone maintenance on rewarding amphetamine effects in an ICSS procedure in rats. Morphine and cocaine were included as positive and negative controls, respectively...
March 12, 2018: Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology
Mitchell R K L Lie, Janine van der Giessen, Gwenny M Fuhler, Alison de Lima, Maikel P Peppelenbosch, Cokkie van der Ent, C Janneke van der Woude
BACKGROUND: Around 30% of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are refractory to current IBD drugs or relapse over time. Novel treatments are called for, and low dose Naltrexone (LDN) may provide a safe, easily accessible alternative treatment option for these patients. We investigated the potential of LDN to induce clinical response in therapy refractory IBD patients, and investigated its direct effects on epithelial barrier function. METHODS: Patients not in remission and not responding to conventional therapy were offered to initiate LDN as a concomitant treatment...
March 9, 2018: Journal of Translational Medicine
Xiaozheng Zhang, Fengchao Cui, Hongqian Chen, Tianshu Zhang, Kecheng Yang, Yibo Wang, Zhenyan Jiang, Kenner C Rice, Linda R Watkins, Mark R Hutchinson, Yunqi Li, Yinghua Peng, Xiaohui Wang
The opioid inactive isomer (+)-naltrexone is one of the rare Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonists with good blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability, which is a lead with promising potential for treating neuropathic pain and drug addiction. (+)-Naltrexone targets the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) binding pocket of myeloid differentiation protein 2 (MD-2) and blocks innate immune TLR4 signaling. However, the details of the molecular interactions of (+)-naltrexone and its derivatives with MD-2 are not fully understood, which hinders the ligand-based drug discovery...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling
Noriki Kutsumura, Yasuaki Koyama, Yuko Suzuki, Ken-Ichi Tominaga, Naoshi Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi Saitoh, Yasuyuki Nagumo, Hiroshi Nagase
The aldol condensation of naltrexone with various aryl aldehydes gives the corresponding 7-benzylidenenaltrexone derivatives in high yields. However, novel C-ring-contracted morphinan compounds were produced when 2-pyridinecarboxaldehyde or its related analogues were used as a coupling partner. The key structural feature was the existence of the tetrahydrofuran ring (4,5-epoxy ring, E-ring) of the morphinan skeleton. The time-resolved in situ IR spectroscopy of the reaction system indicated the short-lived absorption of the distorted cyclopropanone intermediate...
March 7, 2018: Organic Letters
Karolina de Oliveira Gonçalves, Leandro Ribeiro, Cecilia Maria Alves de Oliveira, Jesiel Freitas Carvalho, Felipe T Martins
Naltrexone [systematic name: (4R,4aS,7aR,12bS)-3-cyclopropylmethyl-4a,9-dihydroxy-2,4,5,6,7a,13-hexahydro-1H-4,12-methanobenzofuro[3,2-e]isoquinolin-7-one] is an important morphine-related drug used for combating alcoholism and opioid dependence. Of the eight crystal forms of naltrexone known thus far, only one exists in the neutral form and it crystallizes as a monohydrate. We have isolated the naltrexone free base as two new solvate forms, i.e. the ethyl acetate 0.33-solvate, C20 H23 NO4 ·0.33C4 H8 O2 , (I), and the diethyl ether hemisolvate, C20 H23 NO4 ·0...
March 1, 2018: Acta Crystallographica. Section C, Structural Chemistry
Yan Zhou, Rachel Crowley, Thomas Prisinzano, Mary Jeanne Kreek
Alcohol relapse plays a major role in alcohol dependence and is an important focus for the treatment of alcoholism. The alcohol deprivation effect (ADE) is a widely used paradigm in rodents to model the relapse episodes that occur in human alcoholics. Mesyl Salvinorin B (MSB) is a potent and selective kappa opioid receptor (KOP-r) full agonist, with fewer side effects (e.g., sedation or anhedonia) than classic KOP-r full agonists and a longer duration of action in mice than the structurally similar salvinorin A...
February 26, 2018: Neuroscience Letters
Andrew J Saxon, Sarah C Akerman, Chih Chin Liu, Maria A Sullivan, Bernard L Silverman, Frank J Vocci
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX), a μ-opioid receptor antagonist for prevention of relapse to opioid dependence, has demonstrated efficacy compared with placebo and comparative effectiveness with buprenorphine-naloxone. We report outcomes for XR-NTX in Vivitrol's Cost and Treatment Outcomes Registry. DESIGN: Observational, open-label, single-arm, multicenter registry assessing baseline characteristics and clinical and health-related quality-of-life outcomes associated with XR-NTX treatment in clinical practice...
March 1, 2018: Addiction
Steven J Nieto, Cana B Quave, Therese A Kosten
BACKGROUND: The mu-opioid antagonist, naltrexone (NTX), is a FDA-approved treatment for alcohol use disorder (AUD); however, the data on whether it differentially affects males vs. females are mixed. NTX increases hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity that associates with subjective responses to alcohol and craving in individuals with AUD. The present study tested for sex differences in the ability of NTX to decrease appetitive and consummatory behaviors in rats in operant alcohol self-administration...
February 24, 2018: Pharmacology, Biochemistry, and Behavior
Zhenhao Shi, An-Li Wang, Kanchana Jagannathan, Victoria P Fairchild, Charles P O'Brien, Anna Rose Childress, Daniel D Langleben
BACKGROUND: Heightened response to drug-related cues is a hallmark of addiction. Extended-release naltrexone (XR-NTX) is a US Food and Drug Administration-approved pharmacotherapy for relapse prevention in patients with opioid use disorder (OUD). In these patients, XR-NTX has been shown to reduce brain responses to opioid-related visual stimuli. To assess the biomarker potential of this phenomenon, it is necessary to determine whether this effect is limited to opioid-related stimuli and whether it is associated with key OUD symptoms...
February 23, 2018: Journal of Psychiatry & Neuroscience: JPN
Said A Hassan, Sherif A Abdel-Gawad
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 22, 2018: Spectrochimica Acta. Part A, Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy
Sarah L Withey, Carol A Paronis, Jack Bergman
Although the clinical application of opioids for pain management is often hindered by undesired behavioral impairment, preclinical assays of antinociception typically do not provide information regarding the behaviorally disruptive effects of opioids that may accompany their antinociceptive effects. To address this, we modified a warm water tail withdrawal procedure to determine concurrently the effects of opioids on tail withdrawal latency (antinociception) and indices of food-maintained operant behavior (rates of responding and reinforcement density) in squirrel monkeys...
February 22, 2018: Journal of Pain: Official Journal of the American Pain Society
Karen Chan Osilla, Katherine E Watkins, Elizabeth J D'Amico, Colleen M McCullough, Allison J Ober
OBJECTIVE: Primary care (PC) may be an opportune setting to engage patients with opioid and alcohol use disorders (OAUDs) in treatment. We examined whether motivational interviewing (MI) fidelity was associated with engagement in primary care-based OAUD treatment in an integrated behavioral health setting. METHODS: We coded 42 first session therapy recordings and examined whether therapist MI global ratings and behavior counts were associated with patient engagement, defined as the patient receiving one shot of extended-release injectable naltrexone or any combination of at least two additional behavioral therapy, sublingual buprenorphine/naloxone prescriptions, or OAUD-related medical visits within 30days of their initial behavioral therapy visit...
April 2018: Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment
Donna T Chen, Tomohiro M Ko, Ashleigh A Allen, Richard J Bonnie, Colleen E Suratt, Paul S Appelbaum, Edward V Nunes, Peter D Friedmann, Joshua D Lee, Michael S Gordon, Ryan McDonald, Donna Wilson, Tamara Y Boney, Sean M Murphy, Charles P O'Brien
Individuals must feel free to exert personal control over decisions regarding research participation. We present an examination of participants' perceived personal control over, as well as reported pressures and threats from others, influencing their decision to join a study assessing the effectiveness of extended-release naltrexone in preventing opioid dependence relapse. Most participants endorsed a strong sense of control over the decision; few reported pressures or threats. Although few in number, participants' brief narrative descriptions of the pressures and threats are illuminating and provide context for their perceptions of personal control...
February 1, 2018: Journal of Empirical Research on Human Research Ethics: JERHRE
Joseph V Pergolizzi, Robert Taylor, Jo Ann LeQuang, Robert B Raffa
Proper management of severe pain represents one of the most challenging clinical dilemmas. Two equally important goals must be attained: the humanitarian/medical goal to relieve suffering and the societal/legal goal to not contribute to the drug abuse problem. This is an age-old problem, and the prevailing emphasis placed on one or the other goal has resulted in pendulum swings that have resulted in either undertreatment of pain or the current epidemic of misuse and abuse. In an effort to provide efficacious strong pain relievers (opioids) that are more difficult to abuse by the most dangerous routes of administration, pharmaceutical companies are developing products in which the opioid is manufactured in a formulation that is designed to be tamper resistant...
2018: Journal of Pain Research
Belin G Teklezgi, Annapurna Pamreddy, Sooraj Baijnath, Hendrik G Kruger, Tricia Naicker, Nirmala D Gopal, Thavendran Govender
Opioid addiction is a serious public health concern with severe health and social implications; therefore, extensive therapeutic efforts are required to keep users drug free. The two main pharmacological interventions, in the treatment of addiction, involve management with methadone an mu (μ)-opioid agonist and treatment with naltrexone, μ-opioid, kappa (κ)-opioid and delta (δ)-opioid antagonist. MET and NAL are believed to help individuals to derive maximum benefit from treatment and undergo a full recovery...
February 14, 2018: Addiction Biology
Robert West, Maria Guevara, Charles Mikel
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 2017: Journal of Opioid Management
Walter Roberts, Julia M Shi, Jeanette M Tetrault, Sherry A McKee
OBJECTIVES: Heavy-drinking tobacco users are less likely to successfully quit smoking than their moderate-drinking counterparts, even when they are prescribed smoking cessation medication. One strategy for improving treatment outcomes in this subgroup of tobacco users may be to combine medication therapies to target both alcohol and tobacco use simultaneously. Adding naltrexone to frontline smoking cessation treatments may improve treatment outcomes in this group. METHOD: This double-blind, placebo-controlled human laboratory study examined the effects of varenicline (2 mg/d) and varenicline (2 mg/d), combined with a low dose of naltrexone (25 mg/d) on alcohol-primed smoking behavior in a laboratory model of smoking relapse in heavy-drinking tobacco users (n = 30)...
February 12, 2018: Journal of Addiction Medicine
Giulia A Aldi, Giuly Bertoli, Francesca Ferraro, Aldo Pezzuto, Fiammetta Cosci
BACKGROUND: Smokers with major depressive disorder (MDD) or depressive symptoms (DS) represent a subgroup in need of attention since they have specific clinical features and prognosis. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature (Cochrane, MEDLINE, ScienceDirect, Web Of Science databases from inception to June 2017) of randomized clinical trials assessing the effectiveness of pharmacological, psychological or combined interventions for smoking cessation in subjects with current or past MDD/DS without medical or comorbid psychiatric disorder(s) was run following the PRISMA guidelines...
February 13, 2018: Substance Abuse
Raymond F Anton, Patricia K Latham, Konstantin E Voronin, Patrick K Randall, Sarah W Book, Michaela Hoffman, Joseph P Schacht
BACKGROUND: The opioid antagonist naltrexone is not efficacious for every alcohol treatment seeker. However, various individual factors, such as genetic differences and nicotine-use/smoking status, have been suggested as predictors of naltrexone response. In a randomized clinical trial, we previously reported that nicotine-use/smoking status might be a stronger predictor of naltrexone efficacy than OPRM1 A118G single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotype. In this report, we further characterize the nicotine-users in that trial, examine other drinking outcomes, examine the influence of smoking change on naltrexone effects on drinking, and validate the result in smokers with disialo carbohydrate-deficient transferrin (%dCDT) change as an independent biomarker of response...
February 12, 2018: Alcoholism, Clinical and Experimental Research
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"