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Jason R Cuomo, Gyanendra K Sharma, Preston D Conger, Neal L Weintraub
Radiation-induced cardiovascular disease (RICVD) is the most common nonmalignant cause of morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors who have undergone mediastinal radiation therapy (RT). Cardiovascular complications include effusive or constrictive pericarditis, cardiomyopathy, valvular heart disease, and coronary/vascular disease. These are pathophysiologically distinct disease entities whose prevalence varies depending on the timing and extent of radiation exposure to the heart and great vessels. Although refinements in RT dosimetry and shielding will inevitably limit future cases of RICVD, the increasing number of long-term cancer survivors, including those treated with older higher-dose RT regimens, will ensure a steady flow of afflicted patients for the foreseeable future...
September 26, 2016: World Journal of Cardiology
Katarzyna Rygiel
Advances in oncologic therapies have allowed many patients with breast cancer to achieve better outcomes and longer survival. However, this progress has been tempered by cardiotoxicity, associated with anticancer therapies, ranging from subclinical abnormalities to irreversible life-threatening complications, such as congestive heart failure or cardiomyopathy. In particular, exposure to chemotherapy (CHT), including anthracyclines and trastuzumab, can lead to cardiac dysfunction with short- or long-term consequences, among patients with breast cancer...
September 2016: Indian Journal of Pharmacology
Michael G Fradley
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 21, 2016: European Heart Journal
José Zamorano
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 21, 2016: European Heart Journal
Jennifer Cautela, Nathalie Lalevée, Chloé Ammar, Stéphane Ederhy, Michael Peyrol, Philippe Debourdeau, Daniel Serin, Yvan Le Dolley, Nicolas Michel, Morgane Orabona, Jérémie Barraud, Marc Laine, Laurent Bonello, Franck Paganelli, Fabrice Barlési, Franck Thuny
Cardiovascular toxicity is a potentially serious complication that can result from the use of various cancer therapies and can impact the short- and long-term prognosis of treated patients as well as cancer survivors. In addition to their potential acute cardiovascular adverse events, new treatments can lead to late toxicity even after their completion because patients who survive longer generally have an increased exposure to the cancer therapies combined to standard cardiovascular risk factors. These complications expose the patient to the risk of cardiovascular morbi-mortality, which makes managing cardiovascular toxicity a significant challenge...
September 17, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
Jean Domercant, Nichole Polin, Eiman Jahangir
BACKGROUND: Cardio-oncology is a collaborative approach between cardiologists and oncologists in the treatment of patients with cancer and heart disease. Radiation and chemotherapy have played a major role in the decreased cancer-related mortality achieved in the past 2 decades. However, anthracycline-, tyrosine kinase-, and radiation-based therapies are each associated with independent cardiovascular (CV) risks, and these risks are cumulative when these therapies are used in combination...
2016: Ochsner Journal
Kelly Shum, Amber Solivan, Parham Parto, Nichole Polin, Eiman Jahangir
BACKGROUND: Because of the improvements in survival rates, patients with breast cancer are now more likely to die from cardiovascular disease than from cancer. Thus, providing appropriate preventive cardiovascular care to patients with cancer is of the utmost importance. METHODS: We retrospectively compared the cardiovascular risk and management of 146 women treated at the Cardio-Oncology (Cardio-Onc) and the Obstetrics and Gynecology (Ob-Gyn) clinics. We calculated cardiovascular risk using the American College of Cardiology (ACC)/American Heart Association (AHA) atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk calculator and the Framingham Risk Score Calculator...
2016: Ochsner Journal
Edith Pituskin, Mark Haykowsky, Margaret McNeely, John Mackey, Neil Chua, Ian Paterson
BACKGROUND: Cancer is the leading cause of premature death in Canada. In the last decade, important gains in cancer survival have been achieved by advances in adjuvant treatment. However, many oncologic treatments also result in cardiovascular "toxicity". Furthermore, cardiac risk factors such as hypertension, dyslipidemia, and diabetes mellitus are known to contribute to the progression of cardiac damage and clinical cardiotoxicity. As such, for many survivors, the risk of death from cardiac disease exceeds that of recurrent cancer...
September 15, 2016: BMC Cancer
Tarek Magdy, Brian T Burmeister, Paul W Burridge
The cardiotoxicity of certain chemotherapeutic agents is now well-established, and has led to the development the field cardio-oncology, increased cardiac screening of cancer patients, and limitation of patients' maximum cumulative chemotherapeutic dose. The effect of chemotherapeutic regimes on the heart largely involves cardiomyocyte death, leading to cardiomyopathy and heart failure, or the induction of arrhythmias. Of these cardiotoxic drugs, those resulting in clinical cardiotoxicity can range from 8 to 26% for doxorubicin, 7-28% for trastuzumab, or 5-30% for paclitaxel...
September 5, 2016: Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Lynn A Beer, Andrew V Kossenkov, Qin Liu, Eline Luning Prak, Susan Domchek, David W Speicher, Bonnie Ky
RATIONALE: There is a critical need to develop robust, mechanistic strategies to identify patients at increased risk of cancer therapeutics-related cardiac dysfunction (CTRCD). OBJECTIVE: We aimed to discover new biomarkers associated with doxorubicin and trastuzumab-induced CTRCD using high-throughput proteomic profiling. METHODS AND RESULTS: Plasma, echocardiograms, and clinical outcomes were collected at standardized intervals in breast cancer patients undergoing doxorubicin and trastuzumab cancer therapy...
August 31, 2016: Circulation Research
Wendy J Bottinor, Christopher K Migliore, Carrie A Lenneman, Marcus F Stoddard
Patients with cancer can present with difficult management issues, as the medicine can sometimes cause sequelae destructive to healthy tissue. As this population lives longer, cardiotoxic effects are beginning to emerge, but the early recognition of this signal can prove difficult, with too late a recognition leading to lifelong cardiac impairment and dysfunction. Cardio-oncology can bridge this difficulty, and echocardiography and its newer imaging abilities are proving efficacious in this population. This article will address common sequelae of cardiotoxic treatment regimens and offer recommendations for echocardiographic surveillance...
October 2016: Current Cardiology Reports
Nicholas G Kounis, Ioanna Koniari, George Hahalis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
November 15, 2016: International Journal of Cardiology
Manuela Fiuza, Leonor Ribeiro, Andreia Magalhães, Ana Rita Sousa, Miguel Nobre Menezes, Marília Jorge, Luís Costa, Fausto José Pinto
Considerable advances in cancer therapies in recent decades have reshaped the prognosis of cancer patients. There are now estimated to be over 20 million cancer survivors in the USA and Europe, numbers unimaginable a few years ago. However, this increase in survival, along with the aging of the patient population, has been accompanied by a rise in adverse cardiovascular effects, particularly when there is a previous history of heart disease. The incidence of cardiotoxicity continues to grow, which can compromise the effectiveness of cancer therapy...
September 2016: Portuguese Journal of Cardiology: An Official Journal of the Portuguese Society of Cardiology
Tracy Hampton
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 26, 2016: Circulation
Barbora Pitekova, Sriram Ravi, Shimoli V Shah, Beata Mladosievicova, Stephen Heitner, Maros Ferencik
Cardiovascular diseases and cancer represent the two most common causes of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries. With the increase in long-term survival of cancer patients, cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of mortality for many cancer survivors. In this article, we will review the most common cardiovascular toxicities of cancer therapies and will describe the role of cardiac CT in the detection and monitoring of cardiovascular disease. While there is limited evidence for the use of CT imaging in cancer patients, we will discuss the utility of cardiac CT in the detection and management of coronary artery disease, pericardial and valvular heart disease...
September 2016: Current Cardiology Reports
Christopher B Johnson, Margot K Davis, Angeline Law, Jeffrey Sulpher
The cardiovascular toxicity of cancer therapy has raised awareness of the importance of heart disease in cancer care among oncologists and cardiologists, leading to the new interdisciplinary field of cardio-oncology. Evidence is accumulating to suggest that risk factors associated with cardiovascular disease are also related to an increased incidence of cancer and excess cancer mortality. We review the epidemiologic evidence that smoking, obesity, poor diet, and inactivity can cause both heart disease and cancer...
July 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Sarah Parent, Edith Pituskin, D Ian Paterson
Improved cancer survivorship has resulted in a growing number of Canadians affected by cancer and cardiovascular disease. As a consequence, cardio-oncology programs are rapidly emerging to treat cancer patients with de novo and preexisting cardiovascular disease. The primary goal of a cardio-oncology program is to preserve cardiovascular health to allow the timely delivery of cancer therapy and achieve disease-free remission. Multidisciplinary programs in oncology and cardiology have been associated with enhanced patient well-being and improved clinical outcomes...
July 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Thomas H Marwick
An increasing awareness of chemotherapy and radiotherapy as preventable causes of cardiac failure among large numbers of patients surviving cancer has contributed to the development of cardio-oncology as a subspecialty. Perhaps the most important driver has been that the aging of the population undergoing cancer therapy has provided an increasing number of patients at risk for the development of heart failure. Cardio-oncology has many unresolved questions. In this article the 6 most important unresolved issues requiring additional research are discussed: (1) the frequency of overt heart failure as a manifestation of cardiotoxicity; (2) the optimal diagnostic approach to cardiotoxicity in the context of large numbers of patients requiring repeated testing; (3) the need for better risk prediction; (4) alternatives to the use of ejection fraction as the cornerstone of evaluation; (5) definition of the best strategy for protection; and (6) the need for evidence-based algorithms to guide late follow-up...
July 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Sean A Virani, Susan Dent, Christine Brezden-Masley, Brian Clarke, Margot K Davis, Davinder S Jassal, Christopher Johnson, Julie Lemieux, Ian Paterson, Igal A Sebag, Christine Simmons, Jeffrey Sulpher, Kishore Thain, Paaldinesh Thavendiranathan, Jason R Wentzell, Nola Wurtele, Marc André Côté, Nowell M Fine, Haissam Haddad, Bradley D Hayley, Sean Hopkins, Anil A Joy, Daniel Rayson, Ellamae Stadnick, Lynn Straatman
Modern treatment strategies have led to improvements in cancer survival, however, these gains might be offset by the potential negative effect of cancer therapy on cardiovascular health. Cardiotoxicity is now recognized as a leading cause of long-term morbidity and mortality among cancer survivors. This guideline, authored by a pan-Canadian expert group of health care providers and commissioned by the Canadian Cardiovascular Society, is intended to guide the care of cancer patients with established cardiovascular disease or those at risk of experiencing toxicities related to cancer treatment...
July 2016: Canadian Journal of Cardiology
Eva Bühlmann Lerjen, Laila Hübbert, Antroula Papakonstantinou, Elham Hedayati, Cecilia Linde, Agneta Månsson Broberg
Modern cancer therapy has noticeably improved the prognosis for various cancer diseases, but cardiovascular side effects are not uncommon, both in short and long term. The individual patient's cardiovascular risk profile affects the risk of developing side effects. Potential underestimation of this risk can lead to life-long severe cardiac disease for a patient that has been cured from cancer. Overestimation of the risk can lead to withdrawal of life-saving cancer treatment because of potentially reversible or mild cardiac side effects...
2016: Läkartidningen
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