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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28922583/reluctant-entrepreneurs-musicians-and-entrepreneurship-in-the-new-music-industry
#1
Jo Haynes, Lee Marshall
Changing labour conditions in the creative industries - with celebrations of autonomy and entrepreneurialism intertwined with increasing job insecurity, portfolio careers and short-term, project-based contracts - are often interpreted as heralding changes to employment relations more broadly. The position of musicians' labour in relation to these changes is unclear, however, given that these kinds of conditions have defined musicians' working practices over much longer periods of time (though they may have intensified due to well-documented changes to the music industry brought about by digitization and disintermediation)...
September 18, 2017: British Journal of Sociology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28890775/musical-training-enhances-neural-processing-of-comodulation-masking-release-in-the-auditory-brainstem
#2
Soheila Rostami, Abdollah Moossavi
Musical training strengthens segregation the target signal from background noise. Musicians have enhanced stream segregation, which can be considered a process similar to comodulation masking release. In the current study, we surveyed psychoacoustical comodulation masking release in musicians and non-musicians. We then recorded the brainstem responses to complex stimuli in comodulated and unmodulated maskers to investigate the effect of musical training on the neural representation of comodulation masking release for the first time...
July 18, 2017: Audiology Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28889178/music-and-speech-distractors-disrupt-sensorimotor-synchronization-effects-of-musical-training
#3
Anita Białuńska, Simone Dalla Bella
Humans display a natural tendency to move to the beat of music, more than to the rhythm of any other auditory stimulus. We typically move with music, but rarely with speech. This proclivity is apparent early during development and can be further developed over the years via joint dancing, singing, or instrument playing. Synchronization of movement to the beat can thus improve with age, but also with musical experience. In a previous study, we found that music perturbed synchronization with a metronome more than speech fragments; music superiority disappeared when distractors shared isochrony and the same meter (Dalla Bella et al...
September 9, 2017: Experimental Brain Research. Experimentelle Hirnforschung. Expérimentation Cérébrale
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28864245/musical-training-increases-functional-connectivity-but-does-not-enhance-mu-suppression
#4
C Carolyn Wu, Jeff P Hamm, Vanessa K Lim, Ian J Kirk
Musical training provides an ideal platform for investigating action representation for sound. Learning to play an instrument requires integration of sensory and motor perception-action processes. Functional neuroimaging studies have indicated that listening to trained music can result in the activity in premotor areas, even after a short period of training. These studies suggest that action representation systems are heavily dependent on specific sensorimotor experience. However, others suggest that because humans naturally move to music, sensorimotor training is not necessary and there is a more general action representation for music...
August 31, 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28844645/direct-electrical-stimulation-in-the-human-brain-disrupts-melody-processing
#5
Frank E Garcea, Benjamin L Chernoff, Bram Diamond, Wesley Lewis, Maxwell H Sims, Samuel B Tomlinson, Alexander Teghipco, Raouf Belkhir, Sarah B Gannon, Steve Erickson, Susan O Smith, Jonathan Stone, Lynn Liu, Trenton Tollefson, John Langfitt, Elizabeth Marvin, Webster H Pilcher, Bradford Z Mahon
Prior research using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) [1-4] and behavioral studies of patients with acquired or congenital amusia [5-8] suggest that the right posterior superior temporal gyrus (STG) in the human brain is specialized for aspects of music processing (for review, see [9-12]). Intracranial electrical brain stimulation in awake neurosurgery patients is a powerful means to determine the computations supported by specific brain regions and networks [13-21] because it provides reversible causal evidence with high spatial resolution (for review, see [22, 23])...
September 11, 2017: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28834825/intraocular-pressure-fluctuations-and-24-hour-continuous-monitoring-for-glaucoma-risk-in-wind-instrument-players
#6
Ronald M P C de Crom, Carroll A B Webers, Marina A W van Kooten-Noordzij, Agnes C Michiels, Jan S A G Schouten, Tos T J M Berendschot, Henny J M Beckers
PURPOSE: The purpose of this study is to investigate the influence of playing a wind instrument on intraocular pressure (IOP) and to monitor 24-hour (IOP) fluctuations in wind musicians of symphony and wind orchestras to compare IOP levels during normal daily activities with IOP levels during playing. METHODS: Professional and amateur musicians of symphony and wind orchestras were invited to participate. A total of 42 participants, 9 with glaucoma, underwent a routine ophthalmologic examination...
August 30, 2017: Journal of Glaucoma
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28833189/musical-training-modulates-the-early-but-not-the-late-stage-of-rhythmic-syntactic-processing
#7
Lijun Sun, Fang Liu, Linshu Zhou, Cunmei Jiang
Syntactic processing is essential for musical understanding. Although the processing of harmonic syntax has been well studied, very little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying rhythmic syntactic processing. The present study investigated the neural processing of rhythmic syntax and whether and to what extent long-term musical training impacts such processing. Fourteen musicians and 14 nonmusicians listened to syntactic-regular or syntactic-irregular rhythmic sequences and judged the completeness of these sequences...
August 23, 2017: Psychophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28815301/keeping-brains-young-with-making-music
#8
Lars Rogenmoser, Julius Kernbach, Gottfried Schlaug, Christian Gaser
Music-making is a widespread leisure and professional activity that has garnered interest over the years due to its effect on brain and cognitive development and its potential as a rehabilitative and restorative therapy of brain dysfunctions. We investigated whether music-making has a potential age-protecting effect on the brain. For this, we studied anatomical magnetic resonance images obtained from three matched groups of subjects who differed in their lifetime dose of music-making activities (i.e., professional musicians, amateur musicians, and non-musicians)...
August 16, 2017: Brain Structure & Function
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28815004/hypersensitivity-pneumonitis-among-wind-musicians-an-overlooked-disease
#9
Janne Møller, Charlotte Hyldgaard, Sissel Brix Kronborg-White, Finn Rasmussen, Elisabeth Bendstrup
Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is a complex pulmonary disorder mediated by the immune system and caused by various inhaled antigens against which the subject has previously been sensitized. In about 50% of the cases, the antigen is not identified. Identification and removal of the eliciting antigen is important for the prognosis. We report two cases of HP caused by molds and atypical mycobacteria isolated from wind instruments. We present the first case of HP caused by bassoon playing and another case of HP caused by molds in a trombone...
2017: European Clinical Respiratory Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28812392/psychometric-properties-of-the-performing-arts-module-of-the-disabilities-of-the-arm-shoulder-and-hand-questionnaire
#10
Vera Baadjou, Rob de Bie, Christine Guptill, Rob Smeets
BACKGROUND: The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand questionnaire (DASH) offers an optional performing arts module. The goal was to examine the psychometric properties of this module in musicians. METHODS: This study is a secondary analysis of a randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of a biopsychosocial intervention to prevent or reduce playing-related disability in conservatory students. Baseline data were used to examine internal consistency and discriminative validity of the performing arts module of the DASH questionnaire...
August 16, 2017: Disability and Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28802327/three-dimensional-motion-capture-applied-to-violin-playing-a-study-on-feasibility-and-characterization-of-the-motor-strategy
#11
Andrea Ancillao, Bernardo Savastano, Manuela Galli, Giorgio Albertini
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Playing string instruments requires advanced motor skills and a long training that is often spent in uncomfortable postures that may lead to injuries or musculoskeletal disorders. Thus, it is interesting to objectively characterize the motor strategy adopted by the players. In this work, we implemented a method for the quantitative analysis of the motor performance of a violin player. METHODS: The proposed protocol takes advantage of an optoelectronic system and some infra-red reflecting markers in order to track player's motion...
October 2017: Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28800097/why-do-people-like-loud-sound-a-qualitative-study
#12
David Welch, Guy Fremaux
Many people choose to expose themselves to potentially dangerous sounds such as loud music, either via speakers, personal audio systems, or at clubs. The Conditioning, Adaptation and Acculturation to Loud Music (CAALM) Model has proposed a theoretical basis for this behaviour. To compare the model to data, we interviewed a group of people who were either regular nightclub-goers or who controlled the sound levels in nightclubs (bar managers, musicians, DJs, and sound engineers) about loud sound. Results showed four main themes relating to the enjoyment of loud sound: arousal/excitement, facilitation of socialisation, masking of both external sound and unwanted thoughts, and an emphasis and enhancement of personal identity...
August 11, 2017: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28780308/faster-native-vowel-discrimination-learning-in-musicians-is-mediated-by-an-optimization-of-mnemonic-functions
#13
Stefan Elmer, Marielle Greber, Arethy Pushparaj, Jürg Kühnis, Lutz Jäncke
The ability to discriminate phonemes varying in spectral and temporal attributes constitutes one of the most basic intrinsic elements underlying language learning mechanisms. Since previous work has consistently shown that professional musicians are characterized by perceptual and cognitive advantages in a variety of language-related tasks, and since vowels can be considered musical sounds within the domain of speech, here we investigated the behavioral and electrophysiological correlates of native vowel discrimination learning in a sample of professional musicians and non-musicians...
August 3, 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28774646/subcortical-and-cortical-correlates-of-pitch-discrimination-evidence-for-two-levels-of-neuroplasticity-in-musicians
#14
Federica Bianchi, Jens Hjortkjær, Sébastien Santurette, Robert J Zatorre, Hartwig R Siebner, Torsten Dau
Musicians are highly trained to discriminate fine pitch changes but the neural bases of this ability are poorly understood. It is unclear whether such training-dependent differences in pitch processing arise already in the subcortical auditory system or are linked to more central stages. To address this question, we combined psychoacoustic testing with functional MRI to measure cortical and subcortical responses in musicians and non-musicians during a pitch-discrimination task. First, we estimated behavioral pitch-discrimination thresholds for complex tones with harmonic components that were either resolved or unresolved in the auditory system...
July 31, 2017: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28764939/exercise-related-cognitive-effects-on-sensory-motor-control-in-athletes-and-drummers-compared-to-non-athletes-and-other-musicians
#15
V Bianco, M Berchicci, R L Perri, F Quinzi, F Di Russo
Both playing a musical instrument and playing sport produce brain adaptations that might affect sensory-motor functions. While the benefits of sport practice have traditionally been attributed to aerobic fitness, it is still unknown whether playing an instrument might induce similar brain adaptations, or if a specific musical instrument like drums might be associated to specific benefits because of its high energy expenditure. Since the aerobic costs of playing drums was estimated to be comparable to those of average sport activities, we hypothesized that these two groups might show both behavioral and neurocognitive similarities...
July 29, 2017: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28752284/brightness-scaling-of-periodic-tones
#16
Andre Almeida, Emery Schubert, John Smith, Joe Wolfe
Brightness is an attribute often used by musicians when describing timbral characteristics. It is related to the spectral distribution of energy, as is sharpness, studied by Zwicker (Psychoacoustics: Facts and Models, 1990). In the current work, subjects adjusted the spectral slope and thus the spectral centroid (SC) of one of a pair of sounds to make it twice as bright as the other, so as to build a perceptual scale. The ratio of SC required to double brightness is a little less than 2 and decreases as the SC of the tones increases...
July 27, 2017: Attention, Perception & Psychophysics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28737256/insula-based-networks-in-professional-musicians-evidence-for-increased-functional-connectivity-during-resting-state-fmri
#17
Anna M Zamorano, Ignacio Cifre, Pedro Montoya, Inmaculada Riquelme, Boris Kleber
Despite considerable research on experience-dependent neuroplasticity in professional musicians, detailed understanding of an involvement of the insula is only now beginning to emerge. We investigated the effects of musical training on intrinsic insula-based connectivity in professional classical musicians relative to nonmusicians using resting-state functional MRI. Following a tripartite scheme of insula subdivisions, coactivation profiles were analyzed for the posterior, ventral anterior, and dorsal anterior insula in both hemispheres...
July 24, 2017: Human Brain Mapping
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28733769/communication-for-coordination-gesture-kinematics-and-conventionality-affect-synchronization-success-in-piano-duos
#18
Laura Bishop, Werner Goebl
Ensemble musicians often exchange visual cues in the form of body gestures (e.g., rhythmic head nods) to help coordinate piece entrances. These cues must communicate beats clearly, especially if the piece requires interperformer synchronization of the first chord. This study aimed to (1) replicate prior findings suggesting that points of peak acceleration in head gestures communicate beat position and (2) identify the kinematic features of head gestures that encourage successful synchronization. It was expected that increased precision of the alignment between leaders' head gestures and first note onsets, increased gesture smoothness, magnitude, and prototypicality, and increased leader ensemble/conducting experience would improve gesture synchronizability...
July 21, 2017: Psychological Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28723602/tinnitus-anxiety-depression-and-substance-abuse-in-rock-musicians-a-norwegian-survey
#19
Carl Christian Lein Stormer, Tore Sorlie, Niels Christian Stenklev
OBJECTIVE: Rock musicians are known to have an increased prevalence of hearing loss and tinnitus. The aims of the present study were to examine the distribution of anxiety and depression symptoms among rock musicians with or without tinnitus and how these mental health indicators and internal locus of control influenced upon their tinnitus symptom concerns and the degree to which the tinnitus affected their lives. DESIGN: The study was a questionnairebased cross-sectional survey of subjects selected from a cohort of rock musicians...
June 1, 2017: International Tinnitus Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28720526/effects-of-musical-expertise-on-oscillatory-brain-activity-in-response-to-emotional-sounds
#20
Sophie Nolden, Simon Rigoulot, Pierre Jolicoeur, Jorge L Armony
Emotions can be conveyed through a variety of channels in the auditory domain, be it via music, non-linguistic vocalizations, or speech prosody. Moreover, recent studies suggest that expertise in one sound category can impact the processing of emotional sounds in other sound categories as they found that musicians process more efficiently emotional musical and vocal sounds than non-musicians. However, the neural correlates of these modulations, especially their time course, are not very well understood. Consequently, we focused here on how the neural processing of emotional information varies as a function of sound category and expertise of participants...
July 15, 2017: Neuropsychologia
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