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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29346340/disparities-in-preconception-health-indicators-%C3%A2-behavioral-risk-factor-surveillance-system-2013-2015-and-pregnancy-risk-assessment-monitoring-system-2013-2014
#1
Cheryl Robbins, Sheree L Boulet, Isabel Morgan, Denise V D'Angelo, Lauren B Zapata, Brian Morrow, Andrea Sharma, Charlan D Kroelinger
PROBLEM/CONDITION: Preconception health is a broad term that encompasses the overall health of nonpregnant women during their reproductive years (defined here as aged 18-44 years). Improvement of both birth outcomes and the woman's health occurs when preconception health is optimized. Improving preconception health before and between pregnancies is critical for reducing maternal and infant mortality and pregnancy-related complications. The National Preconception Health and Health Care Initiative's Surveillance and Research work group suggests ten prioritized indicators that states can use to monitor programs or activities for improving the preconception health status of women of reproductive age...
January 19, 2018: MMWR. Surveillance Summaries: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. Surveillance Summaries
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29342257/trajectories-of-alcohol-consumption-prior-to-the-diagnosis-of-type-2-diabetes-a-longitudinal-case-cohort-study
#2
Craig S Knott, Annie Britton, Steven Bell
Background: Non-linear associations have been reported between baseline measures of alcohol consumption and type 2 diabetes (T2DM). However, given that drinking varies over the adult life course, we investigated whether differences existed in the longitudinal trajectory of alcohol consumption according to T2DM status. Methods: For a case-cohort (916 incident cases; 7376 controls) of British civil servants nested within the Whitehall II cohort, the self-reported weekly volume of alcohol consumption was traced backwards from the date of diagnosis or censoring to the beginning of the study, covering a period of up to 28 years...
January 12, 2018: International Journal of Epidemiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29339114/a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis-of-cardiorespiratory-fitness-among-indigenous-populations-in-north-america-and-circumpolar-inuit-populations
#3
REVIEW
Lila M A Hedayat, Claire C Murchison, Heather J A Foulds
Indigenous populations experience health disparities including increased obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease rates. Cardiorespiratory fitness is beneficial for maintaining positive health outcomes. The objective of this systematic review is to evaluate cardiorespiratory fitness among Indigenous populations including comparisons across genders, Indigenous identities, age groups, decades, socio-demographic variables and in comparison to non-Indigenous groups. Included articles reported various cardiorespiratory fitness measures using maximal treadmill or cycle ergometer tests, 20 m shuttle run, 1 mile run/walk test and 6 min walk test...
January 12, 2018: Preventive Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29332673/prevalence-and-comorbidity-of-sleep-conditions-in-australian-adults-2016-sleep-health-foundation-national-survey
#4
Sarah L Appleton, Tiffany K Gill, Carol J Lang, Anne W Taylor, R Douglas McEvoy, Nigel P Stocks, David A González-Chica, Robert J Adams
OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of sleep conditions (obstructive sleep apnea [OSA], insomnia symptoms, simple snoring, and restless legs) and their associated burden of chronic conditions in a community sample. DESIGN: Cross-sectional national adult online survey. SETTING: Community-based sample. PARTICIPANTS: Australian adults ≥18 years, N = 1011. MEASUREMENTS: A cross-sectional national online survey assessed diagnosed OSA, OSA symptoms, insomnia symptoms, sleep problems, excessive daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale ≥11), and physician-diagnosed health conditions (heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, reflux disease, lung disease, depression, anxiety/panic disorder, arthritis)...
February 2018: Sleep Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29317176/race-disparities-in-cardiovascular-disease-risk-factors-within-socioeconomic-status-strata
#5
Caryn N Bell, Roland J Thorpe, Janice V Bowie, Thomas A LaVeist
PURPOSE: Racial differences in socioeconomic status (SES) explain some, but not all, of racial disparities in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. To address this, race disparities among higher SES individuals need to be assessed. The purpose of this study was to assess whether racial disparities in CVD risk factors differ by SES levels. METHODS: Data from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey 2007-2014 were used to calculate racial differences in hypertension, high cholesterol, diabetes, and obesity...
December 22, 2017: Annals of Epidemiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29311365/simultaneous-recognition-of-allogeneic-mhc-and-cognate-autoantigen-by-autoreactive-t-cells-in-transplant-rejection
#6
Adam L Burrack, Laurie G Landry, Janet Siebert, Marilyne Coulombe, Ronald G Gill, Maki Nakayama
The autoimmune condition is a primary obstacle to inducing tolerance in type 1 diabetes patients receiving allogeneic pancreas transplants. It is unknown how autoreactive T cells that recognize self-MHC molecules contribute to MHC-disparate allograft rejection. In this report, we show the presence and accumulation of dual-reactive, that is autoreactive and alloreactive, T cells in C3H islet allografts that were transplanted into autoimmune diabetic NOD mice. Using high-throughput sequencing, we discovered that T cells prevalent in allografts share identical TCRs with autoreactive T cells present in pancreatic islets...
January 8, 2018: Journal of Immunology: Official Journal of the American Association of Immunologists
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29284021/temporal-trends-in-educational-inequalities-in-non-communicable-diseases-in-korea-2007-2015
#7
Gyu Ri Kim, Chung Mo Nam
BACKGROUND: Socioeconomic inequalities in non-communicable diseases are known to exist; however there is a paucity of research describing the secular trends in these inequalities. To this end, the current study aims to explore the recent time trends in social patterning of selected non-communicable diseases among Korean adults between 2007 and 2015. METHODS: Using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES), temporal trends in socioeconomic inequalities in diabetes, arthritis, asthma and depressive symptoms were assessed across three time points...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29282137/central-obesity-and-normal-weight-central-obesity-among-adults-attending-healthcare-facilities-in-buffalo-city-metropolitan-municipality-south-africa-a-cross-sectional-study
#8
Eyitayo Omolara Owolabi, Daniel Ter Goon, Oladele Vincent Adeniyi
BACKGROUND: Central obesity (CO) confers a significant threat on the cardio-metabolic health of individuals, independently of overall obesity. Disparities in the measures of fat distribution lead to misclassification of individuals who are at risk of cardio-metabolic diseases. This study sought to determine the prevalence and correlates of central obesity and normal-weight central obesity among adults attending selected healthcare facilities in Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality (BCMM), South Africa, assess their health risk and examine the association between central obesity and cardio-metabolic diseases among adults with normal weight, measured by body mass index (BMI)...
December 28, 2017: Journal of Health, Population, and Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29279935/association-of-modifiable-risk-factors-in-young-adulthood-with-racial-disparity-in-incident-type-2-diabetes-during-middle-adulthood
#9
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Michael P Bancks, Kiarri Kershaw, April P Carson, Penny Gordon-Larsen, Pamela J Schreiner, Mercedes R Carnethon
Importance: In the United States, black individuals are twice as likely to develop type 2 diabetes compared with white individuals, and these disparities are particularly pronounced in young and middle age. Prior studies have identified differences in traditional risk factors that may be associated with racial disparities in diabetes incidence but have not simultaneously adjusted for risk factors measured across multiple domains (eg, the individual and the environment) and updated over time...
December 26, 2017: JAMA: the Journal of the American Medical Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29259233/cardiovascular-disease-progression-in-female-zucker-diabetic-fatty-rats-occurs-via-unique-mechanisms-compared-to-males
#10
Kelly Lum-Naihe, Ryan Toedebusch, Abuzar Mahmood, Jamal Bajwa, Terry Carmack, Senthil A Kumar, Sivakumar Ardhanari, Vincent G DeMarco, Craig A Emter, Lakshmi Pulakat
Population studies have shown that compared to diabetic men, diabetic women are at a higher risk of cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanisms underlying this gender disparity are unclear. Our studies in young murine models of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and cardiovascular disease show that diabetic male rats develop increased cardiac fibrosis and suppression of intracardiac anti-fibrotic cytokines, while premenopausal diabetic female rats do not. This protection from cardiac fibrosis in female rats can be an estrogen-related effect...
December 19, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29247528/prevalence-and-predictors-of-elevated-high-sensitivity-c-reactive-protein-in-post-myocardial-infarction-patients-insights-from-the-virgo-and-triumph-registries
#11
Mohammed Qintar, Puza P Sharma, Yashashwi Pokharel, Yuanyuan Tang, Yuan Lu, Philip Jones, Rachel P Dreyer, John A Spertus
Elevated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) is associated with worse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but little is known about the distribution of hs-CRP levels and predictors of elevated hs-CRP after AMI in the real world. Translational Research Investigating Underlying Disparities in Acute Myocardial Infarction Patients' Health Status (TRIUMPH) and Variation in Recovery: Role of Gender on Outcomes of Young AMI Patients (VIRGO) are prospective AMI registries in the United States that assessed hs-CRP levels 30 days after AMI...
December 16, 2017: Clinical Cardiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29240836/is-quality-of-life-different-between-diabetic-and-non-diabetic-people-the-importance-of-cardiovascular-risks
#12
L M Peña-Longobardo, B Rodríguez-Sánchez, M Mata-Cases, L Rodríguez-Mañas, M Capel, J Oliva-Moreno
BACKGROUND: To analyse and compare the impact of cardiovascular risk factors and disease on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in people with and without diabetes living in the community. METHODS: We used data of 1,905 people with diabetes and 19,031 people without diabetes from the last Spanish National Health Survey (years 2011-2012). The HRQoL instrument used was the EuroQol 5D-5L, based on time trade-off scores. Matching methods were used to assess any differences in the HRQoL in people with and without diabetes with the same characteristics (age, gender, education level, and healthy lifestyle), according to cardiovascular risk factors and diseases...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29237342/racial-ethnic-disparities-in-late-stage-colorectal-cancer-among-hispanics-and-non-hispanic-whites-of-new-mexico
#13
Melissa Gonzales, Fares Qeadan, Shiraz I Mishra, Ashwani Rajput, Richard M Hoffman
INTRODUCTION: Hispanics in New Mexico are diagnosed with more later-stage colorectal cancer (CRC) than non-Hispanic Whites (NHW). Our study evaluated the interaction of race/ethnicity and risk factors for later-stage III and IV CRC among patients in New Mexico. METHOD: CRC patients ages 30 to 75 years ( n = 163, 46% Hispanic) completed a survey on key explanatory clinical, lifestyle, preventive health, and demographic variables for CRC risk. Adjusted logistic regression models examined whether these variables differentially contributed to later-stage CRC among NHW versus Hispanics...
December 2017: Hispanic Health Care International: the Official Journal of the National Association of Hispanic Nurses
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29234990/african-americans-african-immigrants-and-afro-caribbeans-differ-in-social-determinants-of-hypertension-and-diabetes-evidence-from-the-national-health-interview-survey
#14
Yvonne Commodore-Mensah, Nadine Matthie, Jessica Wells, Sandra B Dunbar, Cheryl Dennison Himmelfarb, Lisa A Cooper, Rasheeta D Chandler
In the United States (U.S.), Blacks have higher morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease (CVD) than other racial groups. The Black racial group includes African Americans (AAs), African immigrants (AIs), and Afro-Caribbeans (ACs); however, little research examines how social determinants differentially influence CVD risk factors in each ethnic subgroup. We analyzed the 2010-2014 National Health Interview Survey, a cross-sectional, nationally representative survey of non-institutionalized civilians...
December 12, 2017: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29225441/a-racial-comparison-of-differences-between-self-reported-and-objectively-measured-physical-activity-among-us-adults-with-diabetes
#15
Shahrzad Bazargan-Hejazi, Jeffrey S Arroyo, Stanley Hsia, Neda Rouhi Brojeni, Deyu Pan
Objective: To investigate: 1) the racial/ethnic disparities in meeting the recommended physical activity as measured by subjective vs objective measures in a national sample of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus; and 2) the racial/ethnic differences with respect to the magnitude of the discrepancy between self-reported and objectively measured moderate-to-vigorous intensity aerobic physical activity (MVPA). Methods: We used data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2003-06 to calculate and compare the percentage of individuals with diabetes who achieved the recommended levels of physical activity as measured by subjective self-report (500 metabolic equivalents (MET)-minutes/week) and objective accelerometer measurement (150 minutes per week of MVPA) across racial/ethnic groups...
2017: Ethnicity & Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29224106/g-protein-coupled-estrogen-receptor-gper-and-sex-specific-metabolic-homeostasis
#16
Geetanjali Sharma, Eric R Prossnitz
Obesity and metabolic syndrome display disparate prevalence and regulation between males and females. Human, as well as rodent, females with regular menstrual/estrous cycles exhibit protection from weight gain and associated chronic diseases. These beneficial effects are predominantly attributed to the female hormone estrogen, specifically 17β-estradiol (E2). E2 exerts its actions via multiple receptors, nuclear and extranuclear estrogen receptor (ER) α and ERβ, and the G-protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPER, previously termed GPR30)...
2017: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29222997/-that-wasn-t-really-a-place-to-worry-about-diabetes-housing-access-and-diabetes-self-management-among-low-income-adults
#17
Danya E Keene, Monica Guo, Sascha Murillo
Lack of affordable housing access represents a significant and growing problem for low-income households in the United States and these housing challenges may present barriers to the management of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes. In this qualitative study, we examined how both housing challenges and housing resources shaped diabetes self-management behaviors. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 40 low-income residents of one US city, New Haven, Connecticut, who had a diagnosis of type 2 diabetes and either resided in or qualified for subsidized housing...
January 2018: Social Science & Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29221515/socioeconomic-disparities-in-the-prevalence-of-cardiometabolic-risk-factors-in-ghanaian-women
#18
Jeffrey Boakye, Danielle Mensah, Swati Sakhuja, Pauline E Jolly, Tomi Akinyemiju
BACKGROUND: Recent trends toward urbanization in developing countries like Ghana, coupled with nutritional transition and aging populations, have led to a rapid increase in the prevalence of noncommunicable diseases such as obesity, diabetes, and hypertension. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between socioeconomic status and cardiometabolic risk factors among women in Ghana. METHODS: Data for this analysis were obtained from Wave 1 of the Ghana Study of Global Aging and Health, conducted in 2007, and included women 18 years and older...
May 2017: Annals of Global Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29216357/parental-history-of-type-2-diabetes-abrogates-ethnic-disparities-in-key-glucoregulatory-indices
#19
Ebenezer Nyenwe, Ibiye Owei, Jim Wan, Sam Dagogo-Jack
Background: There are ethnic differences in glucoregulation and prevalence of type 2 diabetes but studies on the role of genetics in modifying ethnic effects in normoglycemic African-Americans and Caucasians are limited. Therefore, we investigated glucoregulation in normoglycemic African-Americans and Caucasians with or without parental diabetes. Design and Methods: Fifty subjects with parental diabetes (from the POP-ABC cohort) and 50 subjects without parental diabetes were matched in age, sex, ethnicity, and BMI...
December 4, 2017: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29215035/influence-of-genetic-ancestry-and-socioeconomic-status-on-type-2-diabetes-in-the-diverse-colombian-populations-of-choc%C3%A3-and-antioquia
#20
Aroon T Chande, Jessica Rowell, Lavanya Rishishwar, Andrew B Conley, Emily T Norris, Augusto Valderrama-Aguirre, Miguel A Medina-Rivas, I King Jordan
Differences in genetic ancestry and socioeconomic status (SES) among Latin American populations have been linked to health disparities for a number of complex diseases, such as diabetes. We used a population genomic approach to investigate the role that genetic ancestry and socioeconomic status (SES) play in the epidemiology of type 2 diabetes (T2D) for two Colombian populations: Chocó (Afro-Latino) and Antioquia (Mestizo). Chocó has significantly higher predicted genetic risk for T2D compared to Antioquia, and the elevated predicted risk for T2D in Chocó is correlated with higher African ancestry...
December 7, 2017: Scientific Reports
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