Read by QxMD icon Read

Disparities cardiovascular disease

Richard H Singer, Mark Stoutenberg, Daniel J Feaster, Jianwen Cai, WayWay M Hlaing, Lisa R Metsch, Christian R Salazar, Shirley M Beaver, Tracy L Finlayson, Gregory Talavera, Marc D Gellman, Neil Schneiderman
BACKGROUND: Current evidence suggests that periodontal disease (PD) is associated with a significant increased risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) independent of known confounders. PD is a chronic oral disease with significant variation in prevalence demonstrated among Hispanic/Latino subgroups. The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations between PD and CVD risk and variations with sex, age, and Hispanic/Latino background. METHODS: The sample included 7,379 participants aged 30-74 years, from the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos (2008 to 2011)...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Periodontology
Luis R Castellanos, Omar Viramontes, Nainjot K Bains, Ignacio A Zepeda
PURPOSE: Despite the well-described benefits of cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on long-term health outcomes, CR is a resource that is underutilized by a significant proportion of patients that suffer from cardiovascular diseases. The main purpose of this study was to examine disparities in CR referral and participation rates among individuals from rural communities and racial and ethnic minority groups with coronary heart disease (CHD) when compared to the general population. METHODS: A systematic search of standard databases including MedlLine, PubMed, and Cochrane databases was conducted using keywords that included cardiac rehabilitation, women, race and ethnicity, disparities, and rural populations...
March 13, 2018: Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Jenny M Cundiff, Karen A Matthews
In adults, greater social integration is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, including hypertension. Social integration earlier in life may be similarly associated with cardiovascular risk. Using a longitudinal sample of 267 Black and White men, we examined whether greater social integration with peers during childhood and adolescence, assessed by parent report, prospectively predicts lower blood pressure and body mass index two decades later in adulthood and whether these effects differ by race, given well-documented racial disparities in hypertension...
March 1, 2018: Psychological Science
Andrew J Cole, Reginald W Johnson, Leonard E Egede, Prabhakar K Baliga, David J Taber
There is a lack of data analyzing the influence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor control on graft survival disparities in African-American kidney transplant recipients. Studies in the general population indicate that CVD risk factor control is poor in African-Americans, leading to higher rates of renal failure and major acute cardiovascular events. However, with the exception of hypertension, there is no data demonstrating similar results within transplant recipients. Recent analyses conducted by our investigator group indicate that CVD risk factors, especially diabetes, are poorly controlled in African-American recipients, which likely impacts graft loss...
March 2018: Contemporary Clinical Trials Communications
Scott D Casey, Bryn E Mumma
BACKGROUND: Sex, race, and insurance status are associated with treatment and outcomes in several cardiovascular diseases. These disparities, however, have not been well-studied in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). OBJECTIVE: Our objective was to evaluate the association of patient sex, race, and insurance status with hospital treatments and outcomes following OHCA. METHODS: We studied adult patients in the 2011-2015 California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) Patient Discharge Database with a "present on admission" diagnosis of cardiac arrest (ICD-9-CM 427...
March 5, 2018: Resuscitation
Seth J Baum, Christopher P Cannon
Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) has been extensively evaluated. Prospective cohort studies, randomized controlled trials, biology, pathophysiology, genetics, and Mendelian randomization studies, have clearly taught us that LDL-C causes atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. The newest class of drugs to lower LDL-C, the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) monoclonal antibodies, have been found to safely reduce LDL-C approximately 60% when added to high-intensity statin therapy...
March 7, 2018: Clinical Cardiology
Mark J Pletcher, Christopher B Forrest, Thomas W Carton
The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) launched a multi-institutional "network of networks" in 2013 - Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network (PCORnet) - that is designed to conduct clinical research that is faster, less expensive, and more responsive to the information needs of patients and clinicians. To enhance cross-network and cross-institutional collaboration and catalyze the use of PCORnet, PCORI has supported formation of 11 Collaborative Research Groups focusing on specific disease types (e...
2018: Patient related Outcome Measures
Steven D Brooks, Stan Hileman, Paul D Chantler, Samantha Milde, Kent C Lemaster, Stephanie Frisbee, J Kevin Shoemaker, Dwayne N Jackson, Jefferson C Frisbee
The increasing prevalence and severity of clinical depression is strongly correlated with vascular disease risk, creating a comorbid condition with poor outcomes, although demonstrating a sexual disparity where females are at lower risk than males for subsequent cardiovascular events. To determine potential mechanisms responsible for this protection against stress/depression-induced vasculopathy in females, we exposed male and female ({plus minus}ovariectomy) rats to the unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS) model for 8 weeks and determined depressive symptom severity, vascular reactivity in aortic rings (AR) and ex vivo middle cerebral arteries (MCA), and determined the profile of major metabolites regulating vascular tone...
February 16, 2018: American Journal of Physiology. Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Kyle W Murdock, Annina Seiler, Diana A Chirinos, Luz M Garcini, Sally L Acebo, Sheldon Cohen, Christopher P Fagundes
Low subjective social status (SSS) in childhood places one at greater risk of a number of health problems in adulthood. Theoretical and empirical evidence indicates that exposure to supportive parenting may buffer the negative effects of low childhood SSS on adult health. Given the importance of supportive caregivers and close others for the development of attachment orientations throughout the lifespan, attachment theory may be important for understanding why some individuals are resilient to the negative effects of low childhood SSS on adult health while others are not...
February 16, 2018: Developmental Psychobiology
Cho-Hsueh Lee, Kun-Tai Kang, Shuenn-Nan Chiu, I-Sheng Chang, Wen-Chin Weng, Pei-Lin Lee, Wei-Chung Hsu
Importance: Hypertension in childhood may continue into adulthood and lead to adverse cardiovascular outcomes. Evidence suggests that adenotonsillectomy for childhood obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) may be associated with blood pressure (BP) improvement. However, how adenotonsillectomy is associated with BP in hypertensive and nonhypertensive children with OSA remains unclear. Objective: To investigate disparities in BP changes after adenotonsillectomy in hypertensive and nonhypertensive children with OSA...
February 15, 2018: JAMA Otolaryngology—Head & Neck Surgery
Niti R Aggarwal, Hena N Patel, Laxmi S Mehta, Rupa M Sanghani, Gina P Lundberg, Sandra J Lewis, Marla A Mendelson, Malissa J Wood, Annabelle S Volgman, Jennifer H Mieres
Evolving knowledge of sex-specific presentations, improved recognition of conventional and novel risk factors, and expanded understanding of the sex-specific pathophysiology of ischemic heart disease have resulted in improved clinical outcomes in women. Yet, ischemic heart disease continues to be the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in women in the United States. The important publication by the Institute of Medicine titled "Women's Health Research-Progress, Pitfalls, and Promise," highlights the persistent disparities in cardiovascular disease burden among subgroups of women, particularly women who are socially disadvantaged because of race, ethnicity, income level, and educational attainment...
February 2018: Circulation. Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes
Chun Shing Kwok, Jessica Potts, Martha Gulati, Mirvat Alasnag, Muhammad Rashid, Ahmad Shoaib, Muhammad Ayyaz Ul Haq, Rodrigo Bagur, Mamas Andreas Mamas
Women who undergo percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) are at higher risk of adverse outcomes compared with men, but it is unknown whether gender affects early unplanned rehospitalization. We analyzed 832,753 patients who underwent PCI from 2013 to 2014 in the Nationwide Readmissions Database. We compared gender differences in incidences, predictors, causes, and cost of unplanned 30-day readmissions and examined the effect of co-morbidity. A total of 832,753 men and women who survived the index PCI and were not admitted for a planned readmission were included in the analysis...
January 10, 2018: American Journal of Cardiology
Michala Lustigova, Dagmar Dzurova, Hynek Pikhart, Ruzena Kubinova, Martin Bobak
BACKGROUND: In the late 1980s, Czechia was among the countries which had the highest cardiovascular mortality in the world. In spite of enormous improvements since that time, there are still large opportunities in further improving cardiovascular health. METHODS: Based on the Czech Health, Alcohol and Psychosocial Factors in Eastern Europe sample (n=8449 at baseline, 12 years of follow-up, 494 cardiovascular disease (CVD) deaths up to 2015-events), the impact of selected covariates such as education, smoking habits, high blood pressure, blood cholesterol level, diabetes, obesity, physical activity and binge drinking and their multifactorial effects on cardiovascular mortality was evaluated by Cox regression...
February 8, 2018: Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health
Keith C Norris, Karen E Smoyer, Catherine Rolland, Jan Van der Vaart, Eliza Beth Grubb
BACKGROUND: Albuminuria, elevated serum creatinine and low estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) are pivotal indicators of kidney decline. Yet, it is uncertain if these and emerging biomarkers such as uric acid represent independent predictors of kidney disease progression or subsequent outcomes among individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study systematically examined the available literature documenting the role of albuminuria, serum creatinine, eGFR, and uric acid in predicting kidney disease progression and cardio-renal outcomes in persons with T2DM...
February 9, 2018: BMC Nephrology
Meredith E Clement, Li Lin, Ann Marie Navar, Nwora Lance Okeke, Susanna Naggie, Pamela S Douglas
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults; however, this population may be less likely to receive interventions during hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The degree to which this disparity can be attributed to poorly controlled HIV infection is unknown.In this large cohort study, we used the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) to compare rates of cardiac procedures among patients with asymptomatic HIV-infection, symptomatic acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and uninfected adults hospitalized with ACS from 2009 to 2012...
February 2018: Medicine (Baltimore)
Saurabh Rajpal, Pavan Katikaneni, Matthew Deshotels, Sibile Pardue, John Glawe, Xinggui Shen, Nuri Akkus, Kalgi Modi, Ruchi Bhandari, Paari Dominic, Pratap Reddy, Gopi K Kolluru, Christopher G Kevil
Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has emerged as an important physiological and pathophysiological signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system influencing vascular tone, cytoprotective responses, redox reactions, vascular adaptation, and mitochondrial respiration. However, bioavailable levels of H2S in its various biochemical metabolite forms during clinical cardiovascular disease remain poorly understood. We performed a case-controlled study to quantify and compare the bioavailability of various biochemical forms of H2S in patients with and without cardiovascular disease (CVD)...
January 25, 2018: Redox Biology
Shijin Tan, Dong Yi, Wei Zhu, Rong Sun, Meng Wei
Men have a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease, but poorer vasodilatation than women. However, testosterone exerts vasodilating actions ex vivo. We aimed to determine if reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced in vivo could cause 'eNOS uncoupling' that accounts for the disparity between in vivo and ex vivo results. Ovariectomized SHR and WKY rats were divided into 3 groups: untreated, estradiol benzoate (EB) treated, and testosterone propionate (TP) treated. EB and TP rats were treated for 8 weeks, and blood pressure, serum estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone were measured...
January 31, 2018: Cellular and Molecular Biology
Jordon D Bosse, Raeann G Leblanc, Kasey Jackman, Ragnhildur I Bjarnadottir
Individuals in lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender communities experience several disparities in physical and mental health (eg, cardiovascular disease and depression), as well as difficulty accessing care that is compassionate and relevant to their unique needs. Access to care is compromised in part due to inadequate information systems that fail to capture identity data. Beginning in January 2018, meaningful use criteria dictate that electronic health records have the capability to collect data related to sexual orientation and gender identity of patients...
February 5, 2018: Computers, Informatics, Nursing: CIN
Ibrahim Al-Zakwani, Fatma Al-Mahruqi, Khalid Al-Rasadi, Abdullah Shehab, Wael Al Mahmeed, Mohammed Arafah, Ali T Al-Hinai, Omer Al Tamimi, Mahmoud Al Awadhi, Raul D Santos
BACKGROUND: Little is known about sex gap in the management and outcomes of dyslipidemia among diabetics in the Arabian Gulf. The aim if this study was to determine sex differences in the management and outcomes of dyslipidemia in diabetic patients in the Arabian Gulf. METHODS: This study was derived from the Centralized Pan-Middle-East Survey on the management of hypercholesterolemia. Patients recruited were aged ≥18 years on lipid lowering drugs for ≥3 months (stable medication for ≥6 weeks)...
February 5, 2018: Lipids in Health and Disease
S Stürup-Toft, E J O'Moore, E H Plugge
Introduction: There are more than 10 million people imprisoned worldwide. These individuals experience a higher burden of communicable and non-communicable disease, mental health and substance misuse problems than the general population and often come from marginalized and underserved groups in the community. Prisons offer an important opportunity for tackling health problems in a way that can deliver benefits to the individual and to the community. This paper focuses specifically on emerging health issues for prisons across the world...
January 31, 2018: British Medical Bulletin
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"