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intestinal microbiome

Jie Liu, Yi Song, Xiaoguang Lu, Tuo Chen, Wenxiu Guo, Zhiwei Fan, Xin Kang, Yu Wang, Yi Wang
Recently, several studies have indicated that the intestinal microbiota can be regulated by the individual attributes, and even the alternation of circadian rhythm. Inspired by this, we speculated that seasonal variation might also have some effect on the intestinal microbiota. A total of 11 Sprague-Dawley male rats, weighing 250-280 g, were divided into summer group (n = 5) and winter group (n = 6). Cages were individually ventilated at 20 ± 2 °C and 45-65% relative humidity with a circadian rhythm of 12/12 h...
March 15, 2018: Current Microbiology
Xiqi Li, Cesar A Arias, Samuel L Aitken, Jessica Galloway Peña, Diana Panesso, Michael Chang, Lorena Diaz, Rafael Rios, Yazan Numan, Sammi Ghaoui, Sruti DebRoy, Micah M Bhatti, Dawn E Simmons, Isaam Raad, Ray Hachem, Stephanie A Folan, Pranoti Sahasarabhojane, Awdhesh Kalia, Samuel A Shelburne
Background: Pathobionts, bacteria that are typically human commensals but can cause disease, contribute significantly to antimicrobial resistance. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a prototypical pathobiont as it is a ubiquitous human commensal but also a leading cause of healthcare-associated bacteremia. We sought to determine the etiology of a recent increase in invasive S. epidermidis isolates resistant to linezolid. Methods: Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) was performed on 176 S...
March 12, 2018: Clinical Infectious Diseases: An Official Publication of the Infectious Diseases Society of America
Nan Shwe Nwe Htun, Peter Odermatt, Ivan Müller, Peiling Yap, Peter Steinmann, Christian Schindler, Markus Gerber, Rosa Du Randt, Cheryl Walter, Uwe Pühse, Jürg Utzinger, Nicole Probst-Hensch
BACKGROUND: Low- and middle-income countries are facing a dual disease burden with infectious diseases (e.g., gastrointestinal tract infections) and non-communicable diseases (e.g., diabetes) being common. For instance, chronic parasite infections lead to altered immune regulatory networks, anemia, malnutrition, and diarrhea with an associated shift in the gut microbiome. These can all be pathways of potential relevance for insulin resistance and diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between common gastrointestinal tract infections and glycemia in children from non-fee paying schools in South Africa...
March 15, 2018: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Christopher John Kiely, Paul Pavli, Claire Louise O'Brien
Studies of the human intestinal microbiome in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) consistently show that there are differences (an abnormal or unbalanced microbiome, "dysbiosis") when compared to healthy subjects. We sought to describe changes in the microbiome in individual patients over time, and determine the clinical factors that are associated with significant alteration. Forty-two mucosal biopsies were collected from 20 patients that were spaced an average of 2.4 years apart. These were analysed using bacterial 16S rRNA gene high-throughput sequencing methods...
March 15, 2018: Gut Microbes
Guangli Feng, Bernadine M Flanagan, Deirdre Mikkelsen, Barbara A Williams, Wenwen Yu, Robert G Gilbert, Michael J Gidley
Recent studies show that a single or small number of intestinal microbes can completely degrade complex carbohydrates. This suggests a drive towards competitive utilisation of dietary complex carbohydrates resulting in limited microbial diversity, at odds with the health benefits associated with a diverse microbiome. This study investigates the enzymatic metabolism of wheat and rye arabinoxylans (AX) using in vitro fermentation, with a porcine faecal inoculum. Through studying the activity of AX-degrading enzymes and the structural changes of residual AX during fermentation, we show that the AX-degrading enzymes are mainly cell-associated, which enables the microbes to utilise the AX competitively...
March 14, 2018: Scientific Reports
Phoebe Lin
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The intestinal commensal microbiota are important in shaping immune cell repertoire and are influenced by host genetics. Because of this intricate interaction, an intestinal dysbiosis has been associated with multiple immune-mediated polygenic diseases. This review summarizes the literature on how alterations in the intestinal microbiota contribute to immune-mediated ocular disease, and how to potentially target the gut microbiome for therapeutic benefit. RECENT FINDINGS: Several groups have demonstrated the importance of the intestinal microbiome in uveitis pathogenesis...
March 13, 2018: Current Opinion in Ophthalmology
Rene Y Choi, Mark Asquith, James T Rosenbaum
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The intestinal microbiome is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). There are many shared clinical manifestations between IBD and spondyloarthritis (SpA), of which the most common are peripheral arthritis and uveitis. Clinical overlap along with similar genetics between these diseases suggests a possible shared pathogenetic mechanism, which might center on the intestinal microbiota. In this review, we discuss the available evidence that SpA is a microbiome-driven disease and indicate how SpA-associated uveitis could be tied to gut dysbiosis...
March 13, 2018: Current Opinion in Rheumatology
A von Braun, C Lübbert
The incidence of clostridium difficile infections (CDI) remains on a high level globally. In Germany, the number of severe or even lethal cases continues to increase. The main risk factor for the development of CDI is exposure to broad spectrum antibiotics, which disturb the physiological microbiome and therefore enable colonization with C. difficile. According to the updated US and European guidelines, orally administered vancomycin is the treatment of choice. Fidaxomicin is as effective as vancomycin but has the advantage of a lower rate of recurrence...
March 13, 2018: Der Internist
Andrew Leber, Raquel Hontecillas, Nuria Tubau-Juni, Victoria Zoccoli-Rodriguez, Vida Abedi, Josep Bassaganya-Riera
Interactions among the gut microbiome, dysregulated immune responses, and genetic factors contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Nlrx1 -/- mice have exacerbated disease severity, colonic lesions, and increased inflammatory markers. Global transcriptomic analyses demonstrate enhanced mucosal antimicrobial defense response, chemokine and cytokine expression, and epithelial cell metabolism in colitic Nlrx1 -/- mice compared to wild-type (WT) mice. Cell-specificity studies using cre-lox mice demonstrate that the loss of NLRX1 in intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) recapitulate the increased sensitivity to DSS colitis observed in whole body Nlrx1 -/- mice...
2018: Frontiers in Immunology
Benjamin Pluvinage, Julie M Grondin, Carolyn Amundsen, Leeann Klassen, Paul E Moote, Yao Xiao, Dallas Thomas, Nicholas A Pudlo, Anuoluwapo Anele, Eric C Martens, G Douglas Inglis, Richard E R Uwiera, Alisdair B Boraston, D Wade Abbott
In red algae, the most abundant principal cell wall polysaccharides are mixed galactan agars, of which agarose is a common component. While bioconversion of agarose is predominantly catalyzed by bacteria that live in the oceans, agarases have been discovered in microorganisms that inhabit diverse terrestrial ecosystems, including human intestines. Here we comprehensively define the structure-function relationship of the agarolytic pathway from the human intestinal bacterium Bacteroides uniformis (Bu) NP1. Using recombinant agarases from Bu NP1 to completely depolymerize agarose, we demonstrate that a non-agarolytic Bu strain can grow on GAL released from agarose...
March 13, 2018: Nature Communications
Amy N Jacobson, Biswa P Choudhury, Michael A Fischbach
Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a cell-associated glycolipid that makes up the outer leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria, is a canonical mediator of microbe-host interactions. The most prevalent Gram-negative gut bacterial taxon, Bacteroides , makes up around 50% of the cells in a typical Western gut; these cells harbor ~300 mg of LPS, making it one of the highest-abundance molecules in the intestine. As a starting point for understanding the biological function of Bacteroides LPS, we have identified genes in Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI 5482 involved in the biosynthesis of its lipid A core and glycan, generated mutants that elaborate altered forms of LPS, and used matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry to interrogate the molecular features of these variants...
March 13, 2018: MBio
Breno C B Beirão, Max Ingberman, Celso Fávaro, Dany Mesa, Letícia C Bittencourt, Vitor B Fascina, Luiz Felipe Caron
Probiotics and immunization are being widely adopted by the poultry industry with the goal of controlling Salmonella enterica. However, the interaction between these two management protocols has been sparsely studied. The present study aimed to understand the role of an Enterococcus faecium probiotic in the production of salmonella-specific IgA in layers immunized with a live vaccine. Four groups were used: 'Control' (no vaccine or probiotic); 'Probiotic' (which received an E. faecium product); 'Vaccine' (immunized with two doses of a live attenuated S...
March 14, 2018: Avian Pathology: Journal of the W.V.P.A
Janice Crespo-Salgado, Tyrus Stewart, Diego H Aviles
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 13, 2018: American Journal of Nephrology
Hamid Tayebi Khosroshahi, Nosratola D Vaziri, Behzad Abedi, Bahlol Habibi Asl, Morteza Ghojazadeh, Wanghui Jing, Amir Mansur Vatankhah
INTRODUCTION: Systemic inflammation and oxidative stress play a central role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease and numerous other complications of CKD. Recent studies demonstrated that consumption of a diet enriched with amylose (HAM-RS2), attenuates oxidative stress and inflammation, and improves intestinal microbiome in CKD rats. The present study was designed to explore the effect of dietary amylose supplementation in hemodialysis patients. METHODS: Forty-six stable hemodialysis patients were randomized to receive biscuits containing 20 g/day during the first four weeks and 25 g/day in the next four weeks of either HAM-RS2 or wheat-flour...
March 13, 2018: Hemodialysis International
Myreen E Tomas, Thriveen S C Mana, Brigid M Wilson, Michelle M Nerandzic, Joussef Samira, Miguel Quinones-Mateu, Curtis J Donskey
Vancomycin taper regimens are commonly used for the treatment of recurrent Clostridium difficile infections. One rationale for tapering and pulsing of the dose at the end of therapy is to reduce the selective pressure of vancomycin on the indigenous intestinal microbiota. Here, we used a mouse model to test the hypothesis that the indigenous microbiota that provide colonization resistance against C. difficile and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) is re-populated during tapering courses of vancomycin. Mice were treated orally with vancomycin daily for 10 days, vancomycin in a tapering dose for 42 days, fidaxomicin for 10 days, or saline...
March 12, 2018: Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
Laura-Isobel McCall, Anupriya Tripathi, Fernando Vargas, Rob Knight, Pieter C Dorrestein, Jair L Siqueira-Neto
Trypanosoma cruzi parasites are the causative agents of Chagas disease. These parasites infect cardiac and gastrointestinal tissues, leading to local inflammation and tissue damage. Digestive Chagas disease is associated with perturbations in food absorption, intestinal traffic and defecation. However, the impact of T. cruzi infection on the gut microbiota and metabolome have yet to be characterized. In this study, we applied mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and 16S rRNA sequencing to profile infection-associated alterations in fecal bacterial composition and fecal metabolome through the acute-stage and into the chronic stage of infection, in a murine model of Chagas disease...
March 12, 2018: PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Lora J Kasselman, Nicholas A Vernice, Joshua DeLeon, Allison B Reiss
Cardiovascular disease associated with obesity and autoimmunity is the leading cause of death in these populations and significant residual risk remains despite current treatment approaches. Obesity, type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are linked to chronic inflammation, and subjects with these disorders have characteristic shifts in their gut microbiome composition. Recent data suggest that alterations in gut microbial and metabolic composition may be responsible, in part, for induction of chronic inflammation, thus promoting cardiovascular disease...
March 2, 2018: Atherosclerosis
Dezhen Wang, Jin Yan, Miaomiao Teng, Sen Yan, Zhiqiang Zhou, Wentao Zhu
In this study, we investigated the effects of in utero and lactational exposure to BDE-47 on the progression of obesity and metabolic dysfunction in a diet-induced obesity model. Pregnant ICR mice were treated via oral gavage with low doses of BDE-47 (0, 0.002, and 0.2 mg/kg body weight) from gestational day 6 to postnatal day 21. After weaning, male offspring were fed an AIN93-based normal diet (ND) or high-fat diet (HFD: 60% calories from fat) for 14 weeks. We examined body weight, liver weight, histopathology, blood biochemistry, gene expression, and serum metabolic changes...
March 9, 2018: Archives of Toxicology
Wei Ling Lau, Javad Savoj, Michael B Nakata, Nosratola D Vaziri
In chronic kidney disease (CKD), influx of urea and other retained toxins exerts a change in the gut microbiome. There is decreased number of beneficial bacteria that produce short-chain fatty acids, an essential nutrient for the colonic epithelium, concurrent with an increase in bacteria that produce uremic toxins such as indoxyl sulphate, p -cresyl sulphate, and trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO). Due to intestinal wall inflammation and degradation of intercellular tight junctions, gut-derived uremic toxins translocate into the bloodstream and exert systemic effects...
March 15, 2018: Clinical Science (1979-)
Christoph A Thaiss, Maayan Levy, Inna Grosheva, Danping Zheng, Eliran Soffer, Eran Blacher, Sofia Braverman, Anouk C Tengeler, Oren Barak, Maya Elazar, Rotem Ben-Zeev, Dana Lehavi-Regev, Meirav N Katz, Meirav Pevsner-Fischer, Arieh Gertler, Zamir Halpern, Alon Harmelin, Suhail Aamar, Patricia Serradas, Alexandra Grosfeld, Hagit Shapiro, Benjamin Geiger, Eran Elinav
Obesity, diabetes and related manifestations are associated with an enhanced, but poorly understood risk for mucosal infection and systemic inflammation. Here, we show in mouse models of obesity and diabetes that hyperglycemia drives intestinal barrier permeability, through GLUT2-dependent transcriptional reprogramming of intestinal epithelial cells and alteration of tight and adherence junction integrity. Consequently, hyperglycemia-mediated barrier disruption leads to systemic influx of microbial products and enhanced dissemination of enteric infection...
March 8, 2018: Science
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