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Anti-aging, skin actives, cosmetics, botanicals, skin,

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27276911/enzymatic-synthesis-of-bioactive-compounds-with-high-potential-for-cosmeceutical-application
#1
REVIEW
Io Antonopoulou, Simona Varriale, Evangelos Topakas, Ulrika Rova, Paul Christakopoulos, Vincenza Faraco
Cosmeceuticals are cosmetic products containing biologically active ingredients purporting to offer a pharmaceutical therapeutic benefit. The active ingredients can be extracted and purified from natural sources (botanicals, herbal extracts, or animals) but can also be obtained biotechnologically by fermentation and cell cultures or by enzymatic synthesis and modification of natural compounds. A cosmeceutical ingredient should possess an attractive property such as anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, skin whitening, anti-aging, anti-wrinkling, or photoprotective activity, among others...
August 2016: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/24305429/honey-in-dermatology-and-skin-care-a-review
#2
REVIEW
Bruno Burlando, Laura Cornara
Honey is a bee-derived, supersaturated solution composed mainly of fructose and glucose, and containing proteins and amino acids, vitamins, enzymes, minerals, and other minor components. Historical records of honey skin uses date back to the earliest civilizations, showing that honey has been frequently used as a binder or vehicle, but also for its therapeutic virtues. Antimicrobial properties are pivotal in dermatological applications, owing to enzymatic H2 O2 release or the presence of active components, like methylglyoxal in manuka, while medical-grade honey is also available...
December 2013: Journal of Cosmetic Dermatology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/19562883/-natural-ingredients-in-cosmetic-dermatology
#3
Leslie Baumann, Heather Woolery-Lloyd, Adam Friedman
Recently, both clinical and bench research has begun to provide scientific validation for the use of certain botanical ingredients. Related findings regarding proposed biological mechanisms of action have translated into clinical practice. Botanical compounds for which dermatologic and cosmetic applications have emerged include: olive oil, chamomile, colloidal oatmeal, oat kernal extract, feverfew, acai berry, coffee berry, curcumin, green tea, pomegranate, licorice, paper mulberry, arbutin, and soy. Many of these botanical sources offer biologically active components that require further in vitro and in vivo investigation in order for us to properly educate ourselves, and our patients, regarding over-the-counter products based on these ingredients...
June 2009: Journal of Drugs in Dermatology: JDD
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