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Hojun Sung, Hyun Sik Kim, June-Young Lee, Woorim Kang, Pil Soo Kim, Dong-Wook Hyun, Euon Jung Tak, Mi-Ja Jung, Ji-Hyun Yun, Min-Soo Kim, Na-Ri Shin, Tae Woong Whon, Jeong Rae Rho, Sun Duk Park, Hyung Eun Shim, Jin-Woo Bae
A Gram-stain-positive, facultatively aerobic, spore-forming, oxidase-positive, catalase- and DNase-negative, rod-shaped and motile bacterial strain, AR23208T , was isolated from the gut of a cinereous vulture (Aegypius monachus), collected at Seoul Grand Park Zoo (Republic of Korea). Strain AR23208T grew optimally at 25-30 °C, at pH 7 and in the absence of NaCl. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that strain AR23208T shared 98.2 and 97.1 % 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with Tumebacillus algifaecis THMBR28T and Tumebacilluslipolyticus NIO-S10T , respectively...
March 21, 2018: International Journal of Systematic and Evolutionary Microbiology
Masayuki Ushio, Koichi Murata, Tetsuya Sado, Isao Nishiumi, Masamichi Takeshita, Wataru Iwasaki, Masaki Miya
Birds play unique functional roles in the maintenance of ecosystems, such as pollination and seed dispersal, and thus monitoring bird species diversity is a first step towards avoiding undesirable consequences of anthropogenic impacts on bird communities. In the present study, we hypothesized that birds, regardless of their main habitats, must have frequent contact with water and that tissues that contain their DNA that persists in the environment (environmental DNA; eDNA) could be used to detect the presence of avian species...
March 14, 2018: Scientific Reports
Yvonne Gräser, Michel Monod, Jean-Philippe Bouchara, Karolina Dukik, Pietro Nenoff, Alexandra Kargl, Christiane Kupsch, Ping Zhan, Ann Packeu, Vishnu Chaturvedi, Sybren de Hoog
Dermatophyte research has renewed interest because of changing human floras with changing socioeconomic conditions, and because of severe chronic infections in patients with congenital immune disorders. Main taxonomic traits at the generic level have changed considerably, and now fine-tuning at the species level with state-of-the-art technology has become urgent. Research on virulence factors focuses on secreted proteases now has support in genome data. It is speculated that most protease families are used for degrading hard keratin during nitrogen recycling in the environment, while others, such as Sub6 may have emerged as a result of ancestral gene duplication, and are likely to have specific roles during infection...
April 1, 2018: Medical Mycology: Official Publication of the International Society for Human and Animal Mycology
Almut Prkno, Matthias Kaiser, Daniela Goerigk, Martin Pfeffer, Thomas W Vahlenkamp, Donata Hoffmann, Martin Beer, Alexander Starke
Cowpox virus (CPXV) infection is a reportable and potentially zoonotic disease that occurs sporadically in a variety of animals. During the past six decades, CPXV infection has been extensively researched and described in both domestic (cat, dog, horse, cattle) and zoo animals (e. g. elephant, rhinoceros, okapi). Of note, a review of the literature produced only three reports of CPXV in individual or small groups of South American camelids. The goal of this review was to describe the current knowledge as it relates to clinical features of CPXV infection in South American camelids and to compare the clinical manifestations with those described in other animal species...
February 2018: Tierärztliche Praxis. Ausgabe G, Grosstiere/Nutztiere
Hannah Padda, Amy Niedbalski, Erin Tate, Sharon L Deem
Zoological institutions play an important role in promoting the goals of the One Health movement. We launched the Institute for Conservation Medicine (ICM) at the Saint Louis Zoo in 2011 to advance the goals of One Health. In 2016, we distributed a survey to Zoo members to evaluate member awareness and understanding of One Health and to provide direction for future communication and actions from the ICM. We hypothesized that Zoo members would be aware of One Health and care about infectious disease issues. Survey results showed Zoo members primarily cared about chronic, non-infectious diseases and their associated economic costs, with participants ranking their top three health issues of concern for humans as nutrition/obesity/diet (49%), costs of health care (48%), and cancer (37%)...
2018: Frontiers in Veterinary Science
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No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2018: Anesthesiology
Patrícia B S Celestino-Soper, Ty C Lynnes, Lili Zhang, Karen Ouyang, Samuel Wann, Victoria L Clyde, Matteo Vatta
Arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC) is a disorder that may lead to sudden death and can affect humans and other primates. In 2012, the alpha male bonobo of the Milwaukee County Zoo died suddenly and histologic evaluation found features of ARVC. This study sought to discover a possible genetic cause for ARVC in this individual. We sequenced our subject's DNA to search for deleterious variants in genes involved in cardiovascular disorders. Variants found were annotated according to the human genome, following currently available classification used for human diseases...
March 12, 2018: Scientific Reports
Leila Siciliano-Martina, Jason P Martina
Maternal deprivation can cause long-term behavioral changes in captive mammals. Studies regarding captive ungulates have also indicated behavioral shifts in the presence of the animal keeping staff; however, little is known about these effects in captive giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis). To examine this, we observed a population of reticulated giraffes composed of maternally raised and maternally deprived individuals by direct and camera observations at Binder Park Zoo, Battle Creek, Michigan. We conducted observations using a unique ethogram with special regard for behaviors that might indicate stress or anti-social tendencies...
March 12, 2018: Zoo Biology
Julia E Napier, Michael S Lund, Douglas L Armstrong, Denise McAloose
The Amur leopard ( Panthera pardus orientalis) is one of the most critically endangered leopards on the International Union for the Conservation of Nature red list. The primary objective of this retrospective study was to identify common and significant causes of morbidity and mortality in the North American Amur leopard zoo population. This information provides insights that contribute to their improved care, health, and medical management and, ultimately, affects the sustainability of this leopard subspecies in the wild...
March 2018: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Kathryn L Perrin, Anne K Krogh, Mads Kjelgaard-Hansen, Lauren Howard, Louise Bochsen, Wendy K Kiso, Dennis Schmitt, Annemarie T Kristensen, Mads F Bertelsen
Hemorrhagic disease associated with elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus infection is the most-frequent cause of mortality in captive Asian elephants ( Elephas maximus). Survival relies on intensive monitoring of hemostatic status. Thromboelastography (TEG) utilizes whole blood samples containing all the blood components of hemostasis and is therefore a sensitive indicator of the clinical status in the patient. This study was performed to assess the practicability of TEG in Asian elephants in a zoo environment...
March 2018: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Nili Avni-Magen, David Eshar, Michael Friedman, David Kirmayer, Lital Letschert, Irith Gati, Elizabeth Kaufman, Avital Paz, Eran Lavy
Myiasis is a major disease condition in human and veterinary medicine. Domestic, free-ranging, and zoo-housed animals can be severely affected by myiasis. Depending on case severity, multiple treatment episodes may be indicated and can lead to recurrent capturing, handling stress, and anesthetics, all of which increase the risk of adverse responses (including death) individually and also in the herd. As an insecticide, ivermectin is often used for larval control. A total of 28 individual myiasis cases were retrospectively evaluated, out of which 11 cases were also treated using an ivermectin sustained-release varnish (SRV)...
March 2018: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Veronica B Cowl, Susan L Walker, Yedra Feltrer Rambaud
Hormonal contraception is being increasingly used to manage captive animals in zoological collections. Many of the animals placed on contraception are of genetic importance within captive breeding programs; therefore, it is imperative that the application of contraceptive products minimize potential side effects and facilitate a return to fertility if required. Deslorelin acetate implants (Suprelorin®) are one example of a hormonal contraceptive that is frequently used in captivity as they are easy to use and effective in most species...
March 2018: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Andrew J Gall, June E Olds, Arno Wünschmann, Laura E Selmic, James Rasmussen, Anne D Lewis
Reproductive lesions have been described in various nonhuman primate species, including rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta), cynomolgus macaques ( Macaca fascicularis), baboons ( Papio spp.), squirrel monkeys ( Saimiri sciureus), and chimpanzees ( Pan spp.); however, there are few publications describing reproductive disease and pathology in Japanese macaques ( Macaca fuscata). A retrospective evaluation of postmortem reports for two captive M. fuscata populations housed within zoos from 1982 through 2015 was completed, comparing reproductive diseases diagnosed by gross pathology and histopathology...
March 2018: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Cora L Singleton, Michelle L Sauther, Frank P Cuozzo, Ibrahim Antho Youssouf Jacky
The health of 44 wild ring-tailed lemurs ( Lemur catta) at the Bezà Mahafaly Special Reserve was assessed across three age classes: <5 yr (young), 5-9 yr (adult), and ≥10 yr (old). Hematology and biochemistry tests were performed manually (leukocyte count and differential, packed cell volume, total protein) and using a point-of-care analyzer (hematocrit, hemoglobin, glucose, blood urea nitrogen, creatinine, sodium, potassium, chloride, ionized calcium, total carbon dioxide, anion gap), respectively. Urine specific gravity was measured via refractometry...
March 2018: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Patricio D Carrera-Játiva, Eric R Morgan, Michelle Barrows, Torsten Wronski
Gastrointestinal parasites are commonly reported in wild birds, but transmission amongst avifauna in zoological settings, and between these captive birds and wild birds in surrounding areas, remains poorly understood. A survey was undertaken to investigate the occurrence of gastrointestinal parasites in captive and free-ranging birds at Bristol Zoo Gardens between May and July 2016. A total of 348 fecal samples from 32 avian species were examined using the Mini-FLOTAC flotation method. Parasites were detected in 31% (45/145) of samples from captive birds and in 65...
March 2018: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Josephine Bryk Rose, Sarah Davies, Kadie M Anderson, Graeme S Allan, Patricia M Dennis, Richard Malik
An approximately 4-yr-old female Bennett's wallaby ( Macropus rufogriseus) was evaluated for chronic left-sided facial swelling and nasal discharge. Computed tomography, endoscopy, biopsy, mycologic culture, and panfungal polymerase chain reaction were consistent with destructive mycotic rhinosinusitis. The patient's infection was treated with a long-term injectable antibiotic, oral antifungal therapy, and multiple intranasal infusions of voriconazole suspended in a reverse thermodynamic pluronic gel. This case represents the first documented case of mycotic rhinosinusitis in a macropod and underlines the importance of advanced cross-sectional imaging in the diagnosis, monitoring, and management of nasal cavity disease in zoo animals...
March 2018: Journal of Zoo and Wildlife Medicine: Official Publication of the American Association of Zoo Veterinarians
Sabrina N Linn, Michael Boeer, Marina Scheumann
Describing vocal repertoires represents an essential step towards gaining an overview about the complexity of acoustic communication in a given species. The analysis of infant vocalisations is essential for understanding the development and usage of species-specific vocalisations, but is often underrepresented, especially in species with long inter-birth intervals such as the white rhinoceros. Thus, this study aimed for the first time to characterise the infant and juvenile vocal repertoire of the Southern white rhinoceros and to relate these findings to the adult vocal repertoire...
2018: PloS One
Ai Tanaka, Tadatoshi Ogura
The red panda (Ailurus fulgens) is an endangered semi-arboreal folivore with a specialized diet of bamboo leaves. Zoos worldwide maintain red pandas under a variety of housing environments and husbandry procedures that may affect the reproductive success and longevity of captive red pandas. The aims of the present study were to investigate how red pandas are kept in Japan and to obtain useful insights to increase their longevity by comparing the results from a questionnaire sent to Japanese zoos and those from a previous survey conducted in other countries...
March 7, 2018: Zoo Biology
Eileen A Hebets, Melissa Welch-Lazoritz, Pawl Tisdale, Trish Wonch Hill
Increased integration and synergy between formal and informal learning environments is proposed to provide multiple benefits to science learners. In an effort to better bridge these two learning contexts, we developed an educational model that employs the charismatic nature of arachnids to engage the public of all ages in science learning; learning that aligns with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Disciplinary Core Ideas associated with Biodiversity and Evolution). We created, implemented, and evaluated a family-focused, interactive science event- Eight-Legged Encounters (ELE )-which encompasses more than twenty modular activities...
February 26, 2018: Insects
Jan Pluháček, Beatrice L Steck, Satya P Sinha, Friederike von Houwald
Rhinoceroses are among the most endangered mammals in the world. Despite a recent increase in numbers in most wild populations, poaching or political instability may exterminate large populations very quickly. Therefore, captive or ex situ rhinoceros populations can play an important role in their conservation. Previous studies identified infant mortality and interbirth intervals among the main parameters affecting the viability and survival of rhinoceros populations. In our study, we tested the recently suggested prediction that in captive Indian rhinoceros Rhinoceros unicornis , longer interbirth intervals may result in higher infant mortality...
June 2017: Current Zoology
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