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school health

Patricia M Davidson, Cynda Hylton Rushton, Jennifer Dotzenrod, Christina A Godack, Deborah Baker, Marie N Nolan
The Americans with Disabilities Act prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability and requires schools to provide reasonable accommodations for persons with disabilities. The profession of nursing is striving for diversity and inclusion, but barriers still exist to realizing accommodations for people with disabilities. Promoting disclosure, a supportive and enabling environment, resilience, and realistic expectations are important considerations if we are to include among our ranks health professionals who can understand, based on similar life experiences of disability, a fuller range of perspectives of the patients we care for...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Samuel R Bagenstos
This article will discuss the legal obligations of medical schools to accommodate applicants and students with disabilities. The article begins by describing the problem of denial of medical education to such students, a problem that results from both discrimination in admissions and denial of accommodations to incumbent students with disabilities. The article then discusses the disability rights legislation that prohibits discrimination against-and requires reasonable accommodation of-qualified medical students with disabilities...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Michael McKee, Ben Case, Maureen Fausone, Philip Zazove, Alicia Ouellette, Michael D Fetters
Students with sensory and physical disabilities are underrepresented in medical schools despite the availability of assistive technologies and accommodations. Unfortunately, many medical schools have adopted restrictive "organic" technical standards based on deficits rather than on the ability to do the work. Compelling ethical considerations of justice and beneficence should prompt change in this arena. Medical schools should instead embrace "functional" technical standards that permit accommodations for disabilities and update their admissions policies to promote applications from qualified students with disabilities...
October 1, 2016: AMA Journal of Ethics
Hellen J Amuguni, Melissa Mazan, Robert Kibuuka
Infectious diseases of grave concern to human health are emerging from wildlife and livestock populations in multiple regions of the world. Responding effectively to these emerging pandemics requires engagement of multidisciplinary groups of professionals. Using a One Health approach, One Health Central and Eastern Africa (OHCEA), a network of seven schools of public health and seven veterinary schools, with the support of the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), has engaged in curriculum review with the aim of building the skills of multidisciplinary groups of professionals to improve their capacity to respond to emerging infectious diseases...
October 25, 2016: Journal of Veterinary Medical Education
Krista Lundelin, Tuija Poussa, Seppo Salminen, Erika Isolauri
BACKGROUND: Societies worldwide are faced with a progressive increase in immune-mediated health problems such as allergic, autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, as well as obesity. Perinatal administration of specific probiotic bacteria is an attractive approach in reducing the risk of these conditions, but long-term efficacy and safety data are lacking. The aim here was to evaluate the clinical benefit and long-term safety of specific probiotics administered during the perinatal period...
October 25, 2016: Pediatric Allergy and Immunology
Kushagra Verma, Senthil T Nathan, Carly D Comer, Baron Lonner, Suken A Shah
STUDY DESIGN: Prospective Analysis OBJECTIVE.: This study aims to: 1) establish a baseline for the SRS-22 in South East Asia and 2) evaluate the influence of patient demographics on the SRS-22. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Previous studies have established a baseline for the SRS-22 in the US and described the impact of patient demographics. While the SRS-22 is used internationally, limited normative data is available. METHODS: After approval from the local hospital and school board, 1200 adolescents (age 10-18) were asked to anonymously complete the SRS-22 in English...
October 24, 2016: Spine
Jesse Burk-Rafel, Patricia B Mullan, Heather Wagenschutz, Alexandra Pulst-Korenberg, Eric Skye, Matthew M Davis
PURPOSE: Scholarly concentration programs-also known as scholarly projects, pathways, tracks, or pursuits-are increasingly common in U.S. medical schools. However, systematic, data-driven program development methods have not been described. METHOD: The authors examined scholarly concentration programs at U.S. medical schools that U.S. News & World Report ranked as top 25 for research or primary care (n = 43 institutions), coding concentrations and mission statements...
November 2016: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
C Emily Hendrick, Joseph E Potter
BACKGROUND: Breastfeeding is associated with numerous health benefits for the infant and mother. Latina women in the United States have historically had high overall rates of initiation and duration of breastfeeding. However, these rates vary by nativity and time lived in the United States. Exclusive breastfeeding patterns among Latina women are unclear. In this study, we investigate the current and exclusive breastfeeding patterns of Mexican-origin women at four time points from delivery to 10 months postpartum to determine the combined association of nativity and country of education with breastfeeding duration and supplementation...
October 25, 2016: Birth
David Jacquier, Christopher John Newman
AIM: To determine the prevalence and determinants of co-sleeping in school-aged children with a motor disability compared with the school-aged general population. METHOD: A questionnaire on demographic characteristics and co-sleeping habits, along with the Sleep Disturbance Scale for Children (SDSC), was sent to parents of children aged between 4 years and 18 years followed in our tertiary paediatric neurorehabilitation clinic, and to school-aged children in a representative sample of state schools...
October 25, 2016: Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology
Karin Hammarberg, Rebecca Zosel, Caroline Comoy, Sarah Robertson, Carol Holden, Mandy Deeks, Louise Johnson
Some potentially modifiable factors adversely affect fertility and pregnancy health. To inform a fertility health promotion programme, this study investigated fertility knowledge and information-seeking behaviour among people of reproductive age. This was a qualitative study involving six focus group discussions with women and men who intended to have children in the future and eight paired interviews with couples who were actively trying to conceive. Participants (n = 74) themselves generally claimed 'low' to 'average' levels of knowledge about fertility...
October 25, 2016: Human Fertility: Journal of the British Fertility Society
Betty S Lai, Ann-Margaret Esnard, Sarah R Lowe, Lori Peek
This article draws on experiences and lessons from global disasters and utilizes the United Nations Comprehensive School Safety Framework to highlight the necessary role of safe schools in protecting children, as well as adult staff, from the immediate threats and long-term implications of disasters. Specifically, we focus on three well-established pillars of school safety: Pillar I: Safe Learning Facilities; Pillar II: Disaster Management; and Pillar III: Risk Reduction and Resilience Education. In addition, we propose a potential fourth pillar, which underscores the function of schools in postdisaster mental health assessment and intervention for children...
December 2016: Current Psychiatry Reports
E Longo, M Masellis, G Fondi, C Cedri, C Debbia, A Pitidis
Accidents and burns are a major problem in Italy and in industrialized countries, due to the consequences they have on health, especially in children aged 0-4 years. In Italy, about 400 people die each year from burns, with over 70% of these occurring in the home. In the European Union, burns are one of the top five causes of death from accidents, accounting for 3% of all deaths from accidents and violence in those age groups. One percent of all deaths in children are due to burns. In this paper, we illustrate the results of qualitative analysis, conducted according to the methodology of content analysis, on narratives included in the anamnesis of clinical papers at the ED in 738 cases of burns in children (0-14 years) observed in a sample of Emergency Departments in the years 2005-2009...
December 31, 2015: Annals of Burns and Fire Disasters
Jani Nöthling, Sharain Suliman, Lindi Martin, Candice Simmons, Soraya Seedat
South African adolescents are exposed to high levels of violence and trauma, including community violence, abuse, and neglect. Violence and trauma are associated with negative mental health outcomes, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression. Demographic characteristics, additional exposure to trauma, community violence, and types of childhood abuse and neglect may place adolescents at greater risk of developing PTSD. This study aimed to first assess the weighted contribution of demographic factors, trauma load, community violence, and types of abuse and neglect in predicting PTSD symptom severity...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Interpersonal Violence
Francisco M Morales Rodríguez, María V Trianes Torres, Jesús Miranda Páez, Cándido J Inglés
BACKGROUND: The study of coping strategies in children guarantees quality of life from childhood onwards. The present paper aims to determine the prevalence of coping strategies for three everyday problems in children, while examining sociodemographic variables, context variables, and teacher assessment. METHOD: The sample is composed of 7,058 school children aged between 8 and 13 years old. RESULTS: Results show a higher prevalence of the Active Solution strategy at home and in school contexts compared with the health area, where the Active Solutionis the least prevalent strategy, and Concealing the Problem the most widely used, followed by Passivity...
November 2016: Psicothema
Glen Nielsen, Erik Mygind, Mads Bølling, Camilla Roed Otte, Mikkel Bo Schneller, Jasper Schipperijn, Niels Ejbye-Ernst, Peter Bentsen
BACKGROUND: Education Outside the Classroom (EOTC) is a teaching method that aims to promote schoolchildren's learning, physical activity (PA), social relations, motivation, and well-being. EOTC activities are characterized by teachers using the local environment in their teaching, and involve innovative teaching methods, child-led approaches to problem-solving, experimentation, cooperation, PA, and play. EOTC has become common practice for many teachers in Scandinavia; however, only case studies have evaluated its impacts...
October 24, 2016: BMC Public Health
Zuzana Novak, Mary Aglipay, Nick Barrowman, Keith O Yeates, Miriam H Beauchamp, Jocelyn Gravel, Stephen B Freedman, Isabelle Gagnon, Gerard Gioia, Kathy Boutis, Emma Burns, Andrée-Anne Ledoux, Martin H Osmond, Roger L Zemek
Importance: Persistent postconcussion symptoms (PPCS) pose long-term challenges and can negatively affect patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL). To date, no large comprehensive study has addressed the association between PPCS and HRQoL. Objectives: To determine the association between HRQoL and PPCS at 4 weeks after concussion and assess the degree of impairment of HRQoL in the subsequent 12 weeks. Design, Setting, and Participants: In a prospective, multicenter cohort study (Predicting Persistent Postconcussive Problems in Pediatrics [5P]) from August 14, 2013, to September 30, 2014, children aged 5 to 18 years who presented to the emergency department within 48 hours after head injury and were considered to have an acute concussion were enrolled across 9 pediatric emergency departments within the Pediatric Emergency Research Canada Network...
October 24, 2016: JAMA Pediatrics
Bent Egberg Mikkelsen, Rachel Novotny, Joel Gittelsohn
There is increasing interest in integrated and coordinated programs that intervene in multiple community settings/institutions at the same time and involve policy and system changes. The purpose of the paper is to analyse three comparable cases of Multi Level, Multi Component intervention programs (ML-MC) from across the world in order to give recommendations for research, policy and practice in this field. Through the comparison of three cases: Health and Local Community (SoL-program), Children's Healthy Living (CHL) and B'More Healthy Communities for Kids (BHCK), this paper examines the potential of ML-MC community-based public health nutrition interventions to create sustainable change...
October 20, 2016: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Marion Fiorentino, Edwige Landais, Guillaume Bastard, Alicia Carriquiry, Frank T Wieringa, Jacques Berger
Due to rapid urbanization and high food prices and in the absence of nutrition programs, school children from urban areas in West Africa often have insufficient and inadequate diet leading to nutrient deficiencies that affect their health and schooling performance. Acute malnutrition and micronutrient deficiencies are prevalent in children from primary state schools of Dakar (Senegal). The objectives of the present study were to assess the overall diet of these children, to report insufficient/excessive energy and nutrient intakes and to investigate association between insufficient nutrient intake and micronutrient deficiencies...
October 20, 2016: Nutrients
Alexandre Pedro Tavares da Fonseca Magalhães, Elisabete da Conceição Pereira Ramos, Maria de Fátima Rodrigues Pereira de Pina
BACKGROUND: Proximity to urban green spaces (UGS) and open sports spaces (OSS) benefits health, promotes physical activity (PA) and sports practice (SP). OBJECTIVE: Analyse the association between PA or SP according to distances between UGS or OSS and teenagers' residences or schools. METHODS: We evaluated 1333 (53.9% girls) teenagers (13year-old) living and studying in Porto, Portugal (EPITeen cohort). PA was classified as light or moderate/vigorous...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Physical Activity & Health
Matthew Blake, Joanna M Waloszek, Orli Schwartz, Monika Raniti, Julian G Simmons, Laura Blake, Greg Murray, Ronald E Dahl, Richard Bootzin, Paul Dudgeon, John Trinder, Nicholas B Allen
Objective: Sleep problems are a major risk factor for the emergence of mental health problems in adolescence. The aim of this study was to investigate the post intervention effects of a cognitive-behavioral/mindfulness-based group sleep intervention on sleep and mental health among at-risk adolescents. Method: A randomized controlled trial (RCT) was conducted across High schools in Melbourne, Australia. One hundred forty-four adolescents (aged 12-17 years) with high levels of anxiety and sleeping difficulties, but without past or current depressive disorder, were randomized into either a sleep improvement intervention or an active control 'study skills' intervention...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology
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