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Accelerometer and dysphagia

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/20479519/hyolaryngeal-excursion-as-the-physiological-source-of-swallowing-accelerometry-signals
#1
D C B Zoratto, T Chau, C M Steele
Swallowing dysfunction, or dysphagia, is a serious condition that can result from any structural or neurological impairment (such as stroke, neurodegenerative disease or brain injury) that affects the swallowing mechanism. The gold-standard method of instrumental swallowing assessment is an x-ray examination known as the videofluoroscopic swallowing study, which involves radiation exposure. Consequently, there is interest in exploring the potential of less invasive methods, with lesser risks of biohazard, to accurately detect swallowing abnormalities...
June 2010: Physiological Measurement
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/20159136/monitoring-of-physical-activity-after-stroke-a-systematic-review-of-accelerometry-based-measures
#2
REVIEW
Nick Gebruers, Christel Vanroy, Steven Truijen, Sebastiaan Engelborghs, Peter P De Deyn
OBJECTIVE: To assess the clinimetric properties and clinical applicability of different accelerometry-based measurement techniques in persons with stroke. DATA SOURCES: A systematic search of literature was performed using a specific search strategy by means of different electronic databases until October 2008 (PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library of Clinical Trials). STUDY SELECTION: A first selection was made by means of title and abstract...
February 2010: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/17945784/a-radial-basis-function-classifier-for-pediatric-aspiration-detection
#3
Joon Lee, Stefanie Blain, Mike Casas, Dave Kenny, Glenn Berall, Tom Chau
Silent aspiration presents a serious health issue for children with dysphagia. To date, there is no satisfactory means of detecting aspiration in the home or community. In an effort to design a practical device that could offer reliability, non-invasiveness, portability, and easy usability, radial basis functions based on cervical accelerometry signals were investigated. Vibration signals associated with safe swallows and aspirations, both identified via videofluoroscopy, were collected from over 100 children with neurologically-based dysphagia using a single-axis accelerometer...
2006: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/17271128/swallowing-sound-characteristics-in-healthy-and-dysphagic-individuals
#4
L J Lazareck, Z Moussavi
This paper proposes a non-invasive, acoustic-based method to differentiate between individuals with and without dysphagia or swallowing dysfunction. Swallowing sound signals, both normal and abnormal (i.e., at risk of some degree of dysphagia) were recorded with an accelerometer over the trachea. Segmentation based on waveform dimension trajectory (WDT, a distance-based technique) was developed to segment the non-stationary swallowing sound signals. Two characteristic sections emerged, Opening and Transmission, and 24 characteristic features were extracted and subsequently reduced via discriminant analysis...
2004: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/16846507/a-radial-basis-classifier-for-the-automatic-detection-of-aspiration-in-children-with-dysphagia
#5
Joon Lee, Stefanie Blain, Mike Casas, Dave Kenny, Glenn Berall, Tom Chau
BACKGROUND: Silent aspiration or the inhalation of foodstuffs without overt physiological signs presents a serious health issue for children with dysphagia. To date, there are no reliable means of detecting aspiration in the home or community. An assistive technology that performs in these environments could inform caregivers of adverse events and potentially reduce the morbidity and anxiety of the feeding experience for the child and caregiver, respectively. This paper proposes a classifier for automatic classification of aspiration and swallow vibration signals non-invasively recorded on the neck of children with dysphagia...
2006: Journal of Neuroengineering and Rehabilitation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/15605857/classification-of-normal-and-dysphagic-swallows-by-acoustical-means
#6
Lisa J Lazareck, Zahra M K Moussavi
This paper proposes a noninvasive, acoustic-based method to differentiate between individuals with and without dysphagia or swallowing dysfunction. Swallowing sound signals, both normal and abnormal (i.e., at risk of some degree of dysphagia) were recorded with accelerometers over the trachea. Segmentation based on waveform dimension trajectory (a distance-based technique) was developed to segment the nonstationary swallowing sound signals. Two characteristic sections emerged, Opening and Transmission, and 24 characteristic features were extracted and subsequently reduced via discriminant analysis...
December 2004: IEEE Transactions on Bio-medical Engineering
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/11824392/detection-of-swallowing-sounds-methodology-revisited
#7
Julie A Y Cichero, Bruce E Murdoch
Cervical auscultation is in the process of gaining clinical credibility. In order for it to be accepted by the clinical community, the procedure and equipment used must first be standardized. Takahashi et al. [Dysphagia 9:54-62, 1994] attempted to provide benchmark methodology for administering cervical auscultation. They provided information about the acoustic detector unit best suited to picking up swallowing sounds and the best cervical site to place it. The current investigation provides contrasting results to Takahashi et al...
2002: Dysphagia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/1795505/noninvasive-acceleration-measurements-to-characterize-the-pharyngeal-phase-of-swallowing
#8
N P Reddy, E P Canilang, J Casterline, M B Rane, A M Joshi, R Thomas, R Candadai
Swallowing disorder (dysphagia) presents a major problem in the rehabilitation of stroke and head injured patients. In the present investigation, a new technique is developed for noninvasive assessment of the pharyngeal phase of the swallowing mechanism. Acceleration was measured with two ultra-miniature accelerometers placed on the skin over the throat. Simultaneously, the swallow suction pressure was monitored. Swallowing in normal individuals gave rise to a characteristic acceleration pattern which was quite reproducible, and was in phase with the swallow pressure...
September 1991: Journal of Biomedical Engineering
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