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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27919697/apes-submentalise
#1
Cecilia Heyes
Making subtle and extensive use of eye-tracking technology, Krupenye and colleagues showed that, like human infants, great apes - chimpanzees, bonobos and orangutans - can accurately anticipate the goal-directed behaviour of an agent that holds a false belief. How do they do it, by mentalising or by submentalising?
December 2, 2016: Trends in Cognitive Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27918977/young-children-but-not-chimpanzees-are-averse-to-disadvantageous-and-advantageous-inequities
#2
Julia Ulber, Katharina Hamann, Michael Tomasello
The age at which young children show an aversion to inequitable resource distributions, especially those favoring themselves, is unclear. It is also unclear whether great apes, as humans' nearest evolutionary relatives, have an aversion to inequitable resource distributions at all. Using a common methodology across species and child ages, the current two studies found that 3- and 4-year-old children (N=64) not only objected when they received less than a collaborative partner but also sacrificed to equalize when they received more...
December 2, 2016: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27916210/heart-type-fatty-acid-binding-protein-in-the-assessment-of-acute-pulmonary-embolism
#3
Hai-Yan Qian, Ji Huang, Yue-Jin Yang, Yan-Min Yang, Zhi-Zhong Li, Jing-Mei Zhang
OBJECTIVE: To explore the predictive value of heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP) in the stratification and prognosis of patients with acute pulmonary embolism (APE). METHODS: According to risk stratification, 69 patients with APE admitted into the emergency department within 24 hours after onset were divided into the following 3 groups: high-risk group, moderate-risk group and low-risk group. H-FABP- and cardiac troponin I (cTNI)-positive rates of all groups were analyzed and compared, and the correlation between major adverse events (death, endotracheal intubation and cardiopulmonary resuscitation) and the cardiac markers (heart rate, arterial partial pressure of oxygen, right ventricular dimension, pulmonary arterial pressure, etc...
December 2016: American Journal of the Medical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27914211/micrornas-in-cardiovascular-disease-clinical-application
#4
Christian Schulte, Mahir Karakas, Tanja Zeller
microRNAs (miRNAs) are well-known, powerful regulators of gene expression, and their potential to serve as circulating biomarkers is widely accepted. In cardiovascular disease (CVD), numerous studies have suggested miRNAs as strong circulating biomarkers with high diagnostic as well as prognostic power. In coronary artery disease (CAD) and heart failure (HF), miRNAs have been suggested as reliable biomarkers matching up to established protein-based such as cardiac troponins (cT) or natriuretic peptides. Also, in other CVD entities, miRNAs were identified as surprisingly specific biomarkers - with great potential for clinical applicability, especially in those entities that lack specific protein-based biomarkers such as atrial fibrillation (AF) and acute pulmonary embolism (APE)...
December 3, 2016: Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine: CCLM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27910886/sequential-information-in-a-great-ape-utterance
#5
Pawel Fedurek, Klaus Zuberbühler, Christoph D Dahl
Birdsong is a prime example of acoustically sophisticated vocal behaviour, but its complexity has evolved mainly through sexual selection to attract mates and repel sexual rivals. In contrast, non-human primate calls often mediate complex social interactions, but are generally regarded as acoustically simple. Here, we examine arguably the most complex call in great ape vocal communication, the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes schweinfurthii) 'pant hoot'. This signal consists of four acoustically distinct phases: introduction, build-up, climax and let-down...
December 2, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27903877/assessing-the-manipulative-potentials-of-monkeys-apes-and-humans-from-hand-proportions-implications-for-hand-evolution
#6
Ming-Jin Liu, Cai-Hua Xiong, Di Hu
The hand structure possesses a greater potential for performing manipulative skills than is typically observed, whether in humans or non-human anthropoids. However, a precise assessment of the potential manipulative skills of hands has been challenging, which hampers our understanding of the evolution of manipulative abilities in anthropoid hands. Here, we establish a functional model to quantitatively infer the manipulative potentials of anthropoid hands based on hand proportions. Our results reveal a large disparity of manipulative potentials among anthropoid hands...
November 30, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27903628/the-role-of-plantigrady-and-heel-strike-in-the-mechanics-and-energetics-of-human-walking-with-implications-for-the-evolution-of-the-human-foot
#7
James T Webber, David A Raichlen
Human bipedal locomotion is characterized by a habitual heel-strike (HS) plantigrade gait, yet the significance of walking foot-posture is not well understood. To date, researchers have not fully investigated the costs of non-heel-strike (NHS) walking. Therefore, we examined walking speed, walk-to-run transition speed, estimated locomotor costs (lower limb muscle volume activated during walking), impact transient (rapid increase in ground force at touchdown) and effective limb length (ELL) in subjects (n=14) who walked at self-selected speeds using HS and NHS gaits...
December 1, 2016: Journal of Experimental Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27890304/awareness-of-goal-oriented-behavior-during-infancy-and-early-childhood-in-human-and-non-human-primates
#8
Heidi L Marsh, Maria Legerstee
We review the literature surrounding the phylogenetic and developmental emergence of goal-oriented behavior, among human and non-human primates. We define goal-oriented awareness as the ability to perceive goals and perceptions in others. We examine empirical literature involving gaze-following, shared attention, distinguishing between actions and intentions, and the ability to generate and understand communicative cues. We conclude that at least a rudimentary awareness of goal-oriented behavior is present from birth in humans, and in adult great apes...
November 24, 2016: Infant Behavior & Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27890017/extremely-low-nucleotide-diversity-in-the-x-linked-region-of-papaya-caused-by-a-strong-selective-sweep
#9
Robert VanBuren, Ching Man Wai, Jisen Zhang, Jennifer Han, Jie Arro, Zhicong Lin, Zhenyang Liao, Qingyi Yu, Ming-Li Wang, Francis Zee, Richard C Moore, Deborah Charlesworth, Ray Ming
BACKGROUND: The papaya Y-linked region showed clear population structure, resulting in the detection of the ancestral male population that domesticated hermaphrodite papayas were selected from. The same populations were used to study nucleotide diversity and population structure in the X-linked region. RESULTS: Diversity is very low for all genes in the X-linked region in the wild dioecious population, with nucleotide diversity π syn = 0.00017, tenfold lower than the autosomal region (π syn = 0...
November 28, 2016: Genome Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886808/comparative-isotope-ecology-of-african-great-apes
#10
Vicky M Oelze, Geraldine Fahy, Gottfried Hohmann, Martha M Robbins, Vera Leinert, Kevin Lee, Henk Eshuis, Nicole Seiler, Erin G Wessling, Josephine Head, Christophe Boesch, Hjalmar S Kühl
The isotope ecology of great apes is a useful reference for palaeodietary reconstructions in fossil hominins. As extant apes live in C3-dominated habitats, variation in isotope signatures is assumed to be low compared to hominoids exploiting C4-plant resources. However, isotopic differences between sites and between and within individuals are poorly understood due to the lack of vegetation baseline data. In this comparative study, we included all species of free-ranging African great apes (Pan troglodytes, Pan paniscus, Gorilla sp...
December 2016: Journal of Human Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27886267/in-vivo-characterization-of-hair-and-skin-derived-carbon-quantum-dots-with-high-quantum-yield-as-long-term-bioprobes-in-zebrafish
#11
Jing-Hui Zhang, Aping Niu, Jing Li, Jian-Wei Fu, Qun Xu, De-Sheng Pei
Carbon quantum dots (CDs) were widely investigated because of their tunable fluorescence properties and low toxicity. However, so far there have been no reports on in vivo functional studies of hair and skin derived CDs. Here, hair derived CDs (HCDs) and skin derived CDs (SCDs) were produced by using human hair and pig skin as precursors. The quantum yields (QYs) of HCDs and SCDs were quite high, compared to citric acid derived CDs (CCDs). HCDs and SCDs possess optimal photostability, hypotoxicity and biocompatibility in zebrafish, indicating that HCDs and SCDs possess the capacity of being used as fluorescence probes for in vivo biological imaging...
November 25, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27884401/the-make-love-not-war-ape-bonobos-and-late-twentieth-century-explanations-for-war-and-peace
#12
Deborah Weinstein
Why do people fight wars? Following the devastation of the Second World War, this question became particularly pressing. Postwar scholars in the human sciences, from political science to anthropology, investigated the role of human nature in the causes of war even as they debated the very meaning of human nature itself. Among the wide-ranging efforts of postwar social and behavioral scientists to explain the causes of war, research on primate aggression became a compelling approach to studying the evolution of human warfare...
November 21, 2016: Endeavour
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27881766/bridging-the-gap-parkour-athletes-provide-new-insights-into-locomotion-energetics-of-arboreal-apes
#13
Lewis G Halsey, Samuel R L Coward, Susannah K S Thorpe
The tree canopy is an energetically challenging environment to traverse. Along with compliant vegetation, gaps in the canopy can prove energetically costly if they force a route-extending detour. Arboreal apes exhibit diverse locomotion strategies, including for gap crossing. Which one they employ in any given scenario may be influenced by the energy costs to do so, which are affected by the details of the immediate environment in combination with their body size. Measuring energetics of arboreal apes is not tractable; thus our knowledge in this area is limited...
November 2016: Biology Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27876849/characterization-of-two-distinct-early-post-entry-blocks-to-hiv-1-in-common-marmoset-lymphocytes
#14
Beatriz Pacheco, Luis Menéndez-Arias, Joseph Sodroski
In nature, primate lentiviruses infect humans and several Old World monkeys and apes. However, to date, lentiviruses infecting New World monkeys have not been described. We studied the susceptibility of common marmoset cells to HIV-1 infection and observed the presence of post-entry blocks to the early phase of HIV-1 infection in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and a B lymphocytic cell line (B-LCL). The blocks present in these cells are dominant and phenotypically different from each other. In PBLs, the block occurs at the level of reverse transcription, reducing the accumulation of early and late transcripts, similar to the block imposed by TRIM5α...
November 23, 2016: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875700/metacognition-pre-verbal-infants-adapt-their-behaviour-to-their-knowledge-states
#15
Teodora Gliga, Victoria Southgate
Metacognitive abilities, such as knowing we know something or that we made the wrong decision, can be powerful tools for adapting behaviour and accelerating learning. Apes, dolphins, and even rats demonstrate some such abilities; a new study provides evidence that human infants can too.
November 21, 2016: Current Biology: CB
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27872723/a-human-reproductive-approach-to-the-study-of-infertility-in-chimpanzees-an-experience-at-leon-s-zoological-park-mexico
#16
Raul Eduardo Piña-Aguilar, Janet López-Saucedo, Lilia Ivone Ruiz-Galaz, José de Jesús Barroso-Padilla, Mayra Celina Gallegos-Rivas, Claudia González-Ortega, Antonio Martin Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez
Great apes are mammals close to humans in their genetic, behavioral, social and evolutionary characteristics and new genomic information is revolutionizing our understanding of evolution in primates. However, all these species are endangered. While there are many global programs to protect these species, the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) projects that in a near future the wild populations will decrease significantly. Nowadays, the relevance of captive populations of great apes is becoming critical for research and understanding of pathophysiology of diseases...
2016: Veterinary Research Forum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871788/do-monkeys-have-a-theory-of-mind-how-to-answer-the-question
#17
REVIEW
Hélène Meunier
Since Premack and Woodruf (1978), the study of mindreading abilities in nonhumans, especially primates, has been thoroughly investigated. But attempts to understand the evolution of this aspect of human intelligence have mainly focused on comparisons between apes and human infants, while relatively little is known about the abilities of monkeys. This lack of data on monkeys seems mainly due to the hypothesis of a cognitive "gap" between apes and monkeys. However, in recent years monkeys have been featuring more prominently in the landscape of social cognition research, and some of these systematic studies appear promising...
November 18, 2016: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27853612/new-genetic-and-morphological-evidence-suggests-a-single-hoaxer-created-piltdown-man
#18
Isabelle De Groote, Linus Girdland Flink, Rizwaan Abbas, Silvia M Bello, Lucia Burgia, Laura Tabitha Buck, Christopher Dean, Alison Freyne, Thomas Higham, Chris G Jones, Robert Kruszynski, Adrian Lister, Simon A Parfitt, Matthew M Skinner, Karolyn Shindler, Chris B Stringer
In 1912, palaeontologist Arthur Smith Woodward and amateur antiquarian and solicitor Charles Dawson announced the discovery of a fossil that supposedly provided a link between apes and humans: Eoanthropus dawsoni (Dawson's dawn man). The publication generated huge interest from scientists and the general public. However, 'Piltdown man's' initial celebrity has long been overshadowed by its subsequent infamy as one of the most famous scientific frauds in history. Our re-evaluation of the Piltdown fossils using the latest scientific methods (DNA analyses, high-precision measurements, spectroscopy and virtual anthropology) shows that it is highly likely that a single orang-utan specimen and at least two human specimens were used to create the fake fossils...
August 2016: Royal Society Open Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27853603/play-solicitation-gestures-in-chimpanzees-in-the-wild-flexible-adjustment-to-social-circumstances-and-individual-matrices
#19
Marlen Fröhlich, Roman M Wittig, Simone Pika
Social play is a frequent behaviour in great apes and involves sophisticated forms of communicative exchange. While it is well established that great apes test and practise the majority of their gestural signals during play interactions, the influence of demographic factors and kin relationships between the interactants on the form and variability of gestures are relatively little understood. We thus carried out the first systematic study on the exchange of play-soliciting gestures in two chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) communities of different subspecies...
August 2016: Royal Society Open Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27849056/observations-of-severe-and-lethal-coalitionary-attacks-in-wild-mountain-gorillas
#20
Stacy Rosenbaum, Veronica Vecellio, Tara Stoinski
In humans and chimpanzees, most intraspecific killing occurs during coalitionary intergroup conflict. In the closely related genus Gorilla, such behavior has not been described. We report three cases of multi-male, multi-female wild mountain gorilla (G. beringei) groups attacking extra-group males. The behavior was strikingly similar to reports in chimpanzees, but was never observed in gorillas until after a demographic transition left ~25% of the population living in large social groups with multiple (3+) males...
November 16, 2016: Scientific Reports
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