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Metabolic disorders and renal function

Petra Rust, Cem Ekmekcioglu
Excessive dietary salt (sodium chloride) intake is associated with an increased risk for hypertension, which in turn is especially a major risk factor for stroke and other cardiovascular pathologies, but also kidney diseases. Besides, high salt intake or preference for salty food is discussed to be positive associated with stomach cancer, and according to recent studies probably also obesity risk. On the other hand a reduction of dietary salt intake leads to a considerable reduction in blood pressure, especially in hypertensive patients but to a lesser extent also in normotensives as several meta-analyses of interventional studies have shown...
October 19, 2016: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Junichiro Hashimoto
Arterial structure and function change progressively with advancing age. Owing to long-lasting repetitive stretch with intermittent cardiac contraction, elastic fibers in the tunica media of large arteries gradually degenerate and are replaced by collagenous fibers. Such medial degeneration causes elastic arteries to stiffen and dilate. However, the speed of the vascular aging varies considerably among individuals; a discrepancy often exists between the chronological age of an individual and the biological age of his or her arteries...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Sandra Azevedo Antunes, Maria Eugênia Fernandes Canziani
Anemia is a common complication and its impact on morbimortality in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) is well known. The discovery of hepcidin and its functions has contributed to a better understanding of iron metabolism disorders in CKD anemia. Hepcidin is a peptide mainly produced by hepatocytes and, through a connection with ferroportin, it regulates iron absorption in the duodenum and its release of stock cells. High hepcidin concentrations described in patients with CKD, especially in more advanced stages are attributed to decreased renal excretion and increased production...
July 2016: Jornal Brasileiro de Nefrologia: ʹorgão Oficial de Sociedades Brasileira e Latino-Americana de Nefrologia
Bhupender Kumar Bajaj, Ankur Wadhwa, Richa Singh, Saurabh Gupta
Wilson's disease is a multisystem disorder which manifests with hepatic, neurological, musculoskeletal, hematological, renal, and cardiac symptoms. The hepatic and neurological manifestations often overshadow the other system involvement including cardiac symptoms and signs, which may prove fatal. We report a case of a young female who presented with progressive parkinsonian features and dystonia for around 4 months followed 2 months later by the complaint of episodes of light-headedness. She was diagnosed to have Wilson's disease based on the presence of Kayser-Fleischer ring and laboratory parameters of copper metabolism...
October 2016: Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice
Y J Deng, S L Zhang, P M Liu, L F Mai, J Y Tang, L Yan
Objective: To compare the incidence of metabolic disorders and uric acid (UA) levels between patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) and essential hypertension (EH), and to explore factors associated with UA levels in these patients. Methods: A total of 117 PA and 117 EH patients individually matched by sex, age, blood pressure and duration of hypertension were recruited from in-hospital patients who were hospitalized in our department because of suspicion of secondary hypertension from January 2008 to December 2014...
September 24, 2016: Zhonghua Xin Xue Guan Bing za Zhi
Silvia Lai, Mauro Ciccariello, Mira Dimko, Alessandro Galani, Silvio Lucci, Rosario Cianci, Amalia Mariotti
: Bakground/Aims: Cardiovascular diseases represent the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with cronich kidney disease (CKD). The pathogenesis includes a complex, bidirectional interaction between heart and kidney termed cardiorenal syndrome type 4. The aim of study was to evaluate the association between renal and cardiovascular ultrasonographic parameters and identify early markers of cardiovascular risk. METHODS: A total of 35 patients with CKD and 25 healthy controls, were enrolled and we have evaluated inflammatory indexes, mineral metabolism, renal function, renal and cardiovascular ultrasonographic parameters...
September 26, 2016: Kidney & Blood Pressure Research
Kelly Green Corkins, Teresa Shurley
Infant formulas are designed to be a substitute for breast milk. Since they are sole source of nutrition for growing and developing infants, they are highly regulated by the government. All ingredients in infant formulas must be considered "generally recognized as safe." Manufacturers are continually modifying their products to make them more like breast milk. Functional ingredients added to infant formula include long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, nucleotides, prebiotics, and probiotics. The most common breast milk substitutes are standard cow's milk-based term infant formulas, which include subcategories of organic and breast milk supplementation, and come in standard dilutions of 19 or 20 calories per ounce...
September 19, 2016: Nutrition in Clinical Practice
Junichiro Hashimoto
Arterial structure and function change progressively with advancing age. Owing to long-lasting repetitive stretch with intermittent cardiac contraction, elastic fibers in the tunica media of large arteries gradually degenerate and are replaced by collagenous fibers. Such medial degeneration causes elastic arteries to stiffen and dilate. However, the speed of the vascular aging varies considerably among individuals; a discrepancy often exists between the chronological age of an individual and the biological age of his or her arteries...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Richard D Beger, Warwick Dunn, Michael A Schmidt, Steven S Gross, Jennifer A Kirwan, Marta Cascante, Lorraine Brennan, David S Wishart, Matej Oresic, Thomas Hankemeier, David I Broadhurst, Andrew N Lane, Karsten Suhre, Gabi Kastenmüller, Susan J Sumner, Ines Thiele, Oliver Fiehn, Rima Kaddurah-Daouk
INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND TO METABOLOMICS: Metabolomics is the comprehensive study of the metabolome, the repertoire of biochemicals (or small molecules) present in cells, tissues, and body fluids. The study of metabolism at the global or "-omics" level is a rapidly growing field that has the potential to have a profound impact upon medical practice. At the center of metabolomics, is the concept that a person's metabolic state provides a close representation of that individual's overall health status...
2016: Metabolomics: Official Journal of the Metabolomic Society
Xiaodong Yang, John Mudgett, Ghina Bou-About, Marie-France Champy, Hugues Jacobs, Laurent Monassier, Guillaume Pavlovic, Tania Sorg, Yann Herault, Benoit Petit-Demouliere, Ku Lu, Wen Feng, Hongwu Wang, Li-Jun Ma, Roger Askew, Mark D Erion, David E Kelley, Robert W Myers, Cai Li, Hong-Ping Guan
Mutations of AMPKγ2 subunit, N488I (AMPKγ2NI) and R531G (AMPKγ2RG), are associated with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome, a cardiac disorder characterized by ventricular pre-excitation in humans. Cardiac-specific transgenic overexpression of human AMPKγ2NI or AMPKγ2RG leads to constitutive AMPK activation and the WPW phenotype in mice. However, overexpression of these mutant proteins also caused profound, non-physiological increase in cardiac glycogen, which might abnormally alter the true phenotype...
September 12, 2016: Journal of Biological Chemistry
Joerg C Schefold, Gerasimos Filippatos, Gerd Hasenfuss, Stefan D Anker, Stephan von Haehling
Heart failure (HF) is a major health-care problem and the prognosis of affected patients is poor. HF often coexists with a number of comorbidities of which declining renal function is of particular importance. A loss of glomerular filtration rate, as in acute kidney injury (AKI) or chronic kidney disease (CKD), independently predicts mortality and accelerates the overall progression of cardiovascular disease and HF. Importantly, cardiac and renal diseases interact in a complex bidirectional and interdependent manner in both acute and chronic settings...
October 2016: Nature Reviews. Nephrology
Saoussen M'dimegh, Asma Omezzine, Mériam Ben Hamida-Rebai, Cécile Aquaviva-Bourdain, Ibtihel M'barek, Wissal Sahtout, Dorsaf Zellama, Geneviéve Souche, Abdellatif Achour, Saoussen Abroug, Ali Bouslama
Primary hyperoxaluria is a genetic disorder in glyoxylate metabolism that leads to systemic overproduction of oxalate. Functional deficiency of alanine-glyoxylate aminotransferase in this disease leads to recurrent nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis, systemic oxalosis, and kidney failure. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular etiology of kidney transplant loss in a young Tunisian individual. We present a young man with end-stage renal disease who received a kidney allograft and experienced early graft failure...
August 25, 2016: Transplant Immunology
Amine Chakroun, Mariem Ben Said, Amine Ennouri, Imen Achour, Mouna Mnif, Mohamed Abid, Abdelmonem Ghorbel, Jan D Marshall, Jürgen K Naggert, Saber Masmoudi
Alström syndrome is a clinically complex disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of sensory functions, resulting in visual and audiological impairment as well as metabolic disturbances. It is caused by recessively inherited mutations in the ALMS1 gene, which codes for a centrosomal/basal body protein. The purpose of this study was to investigate the genetic and clinical features of two Tunisian affected siblings with Alström syndrome. Detailed clinical examinations were performed including complete ophthalmic examination, serial audiograms and several biochemical and hormonal blood tests...
September 2016: European Journal of Medical Genetics
Michael R Charlton
Longterm outcomes in liver transplant recipients has undergone a dramatic transition, driven by three factors: i. efficacy of immunosuppression, ii. declining impact of viral hepatitis with surge in obesity and alcohol -related liver diseases, and iii. shortage of donor organs with subsequent recipient frailty at the time of transplantation. Graft function in general and rejection specifically are uncommon determinants of longterm outcomes. The most common causes of mortality in liver transplant recipients are cardiovascular disease, renal failure and malignancies, all of which are contributed to by immunosuppression and the metabolic syndrome...
August 12, 2016: Liver Transplantation
G Barrientos, A Uceda, A Sgariglia, G Giardina, S M Blois, J E Toblli
OBJECTIVE: Severe forms of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, like early-onset preeclampsia (PE), are often linked with abnormal placentation. Genetic factors contributed by the father may be important for placental development, and previous studies support the existence of a paternal component for PE and fetal growth restriction. Thus, the present study was conducted to evaluate the influence of arterial hypertension as a paternal factor on placental development and fetal growth in normal female rats...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
A Vrdoljak, V Ivkovic, S Karanovic, Z Dika, V Domislovic, K Dapic, L Gallineo, E Ivandic, J Josipovic, I Vukovic, J Kos, M Laganovic, T Zeljkovic Vrkic, M Fistrek Prlic, I Pecin, M Fucek, J Sertic, N Leko, B Jelakovic
OBJECTIVE: Chronic kidney disease(CKD) is established CV risk factor, and already early renal impairment(RI) increases risk for hypertension(HT) and loss of renal function. It was reported that blood pressure (BP) and metabolic derangements are associated with glomerular hyperfiltration(GHF), and GHF increases risk of developing microalbuminuria (MA) in HT stage 1. Our aim was to analyze whether GHF predicts progression to HT and RI in apparently healthy subjects. DESIGN AND METHOD: Out of 954 subjects enrolled in ENAH follow-up study, 371 (137 m, 234 w; mean age = 46 years) were eligible for further analysis:100 with optimal, 72 with normal BP, 70 with PHT (high normal BP), and 129 with newly diagnosed untreated HT...
September 2016: Journal of Hypertension
Sarwat B Ahmad, Michael Miller, Steven Hanish, Stephen T Bartlett, William Hutson, Rolf N Barth, John C LaMattina
BACKGROUND: Lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase (LCAT) deficiency is a rare autosomal recessive disorder of lipoprotein metabolism that results in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) necessitating transplantation. As LCAT is produced in the liver, combined kidney and liver transplantation was proposed to cure the clinical syndrome of LCAT deficiency. METHODS: A 29-year-old male with ESRD secondary to LCAT deficiency underwent a sequential kidney-liver transplantation from the same living donor (LD)...
October 2016: Clinical Transplantation
David Collister, Thomas Ferguson, Paul Komenda, Navdeep Tangri
Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a global public health problem that is associated with excess morbidity, mortality, and health resource utilization. The progression of CKD is defined by a decrease in glomerular filtration rate and leads to a variety of metabolic abnormalities including acidosis, hypertension, anemia, and mineral bone disorder. Lower glomerular filtration rate also bears a strong relationship with an increased risk of cardiovascular events, end-stage renal disease, and death. Patterns of CKD progression include linear and nonlinear trajectories, but kidney function can remain stable for years in some individuals...
July 2016: Seminars in Nephrology
Louise Grant, Emma K Lees, Laura A Forney, Nimesh Mody, Thomas Gettys, Paul A J Brown, Heather M Wilson, Mirela Delibegovic
Dietary methionine restriction (MR) leads to loss of adiposity, improved insulin sensitivity and lifespan extension. The possibility that dietary MR can protect the kidney from age-associated deterioration has not been addressed. Aged (10-month old) male and female mice were placed on a MR (0.172% methionine) or control diet (0.86% methionine) for 8-weeks and blood glucose, renal insulin signalling, and gene expression were assessed. Methionine restriction lead to decreased blood glucose levels compared to control-fed mice, and enhanced insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of PKB/Akt and S6 in kidneys, indicative of improved glucose homeostasis...
July 2016: Mechanisms of Ageing and Development
Naila Rabbani, Amal Ashour, Paul J Thornalley
Protein glycation in biological systems occurs predominantly on lysine, arginine and N-terminal residues of proteins. Major quantitative glycation adducts are found at mean extents of modification of 1-5 mol percent of proteins. These are glucose-derived fructosamine on lysine and N-terminal residues of proteins, methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone on arginine residues and N(ε)-carboxymethyl-lysine residues mainly formed by the oxidative degradation of fructosamine. Total glycation adducts of different types are quantified by stable isotopic dilution analysis liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in multiple reaction monitoring mode...
August 2016: Glycoconjugate Journal
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