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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28236665/using-a-butterflyfish-genome-as-a-general-tool-for-rad-seq-studies-in-specialized-reef-fish
#1
Joseph D DiBattista, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Marek J Piatek, Xin Wang, Manuel Aranda, Michael L Berumen
Data from a large-scale restriction site associated DNA (RAD-Seq) study of nine butterflyfish species in the Red Sea and Arabian Sea provided a means to test the utility of a recently published draft genome (Chaetodon austriacus) and assess apparent bias in this method of isolating nuclear loci. We here processed double-digest restriction-site (ddRAD) associated DNA sequencing data to identify single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers and their associated function with and without our reference genome to see if it improves the quality of RAD-Seq markers...
February 25, 2017: Molecular Ecology Resources
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28231621/the-biogeography-of-tropical-reef-fishes-endemism-and-provinciality-through-time
#2
Peter F Cowman, Valeriano Parravicini, Michel Kulbicki, Sergio R Floeter
The largest marine biodiversity hotspot straddles the Indian and Pacific Oceans, driven by taxa associated with tropical coral reefs. Centred on the Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA), this biodiversity hotspot forms the 'bullseye' of a steep gradient in species richness from this centre to the periphery of the vast Indo-Pacific region. Complex patterns of endemism, wide-ranging species and assemblage differences have obscured our understanding of the genesis of this biodiversity pattern and its maintenance across two-thirds of the world's oceans...
February 23, 2017: Biological Reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28229261/revision-of-neolebouria-gibson-1976-digenea-opecoelidae-with-trilobovarium-n-g-for-species-infecting-tropical-and-subtropical-shallow-water-fishes
#3
Storm B Martin, Scott C Cutmore, Thomas H Cribb
A new opecoelid trematode is reported from fishes of the Lethrinidae, Lutjanidae and Nemipteridae off Lizard Island on the northern Great Barrier Reef, Australia. The new species keys to Neolebouria Gibson, 1976 and shows strong similarity to several species of that genus, but is not consistent with the type-species, N. georgiensis Gibson, 1976, or others known from temperate/polar and/or deep-sea fishes. The new species is also phylogenetically distant from N. lanceolata (Price, 1934) Reimer, 1987, the only representative of the genus for which molecular data are available...
February 22, 2017: Systematic Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28229026/spawning-aggregation-of-white-streaked-grouper-epinephelus-ongus-spatial-distribution-and-annual-variation-in-the-fish-density-within-a-spawning-ground
#4
Atsushi Nanami, Taku Sato, Yuuki Kawabata, Junichi Okuyama
White-streaked grouper (Epinephelus ongus) is an important fisheries target and forms spawning aggregations at particular spawning grounds. The aims of the present study were to investigate the ecological characteristics of annual spawning aggregations such as (1) spatial variations in the density of E. ongus at the spawning ground, (2) the relationship between fish density and environmental variables, (3) inter-annual variations in the spawning aggregation, (4) the proportion of males to females at the spawning ground for several days pre-and post-spawning and (5) the relationship between male density and female density at the protected spawning ground, based on observations over five years at an Okinawan coral reef...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28228681/discovery-of-a-new-species-of-hermit-crab-of-the-genus-pylopaguropsis-alcock-1905-from-the-caribbean-den-commensal-or-cleaner-crustacea-anomura-paguridae
#5
Rafael Lemaitre
A new secretive, yet brightly colored hermit crab species of the family Paguridae, Pylopaguropsis mollymulleraesp. n., is fully described based on specimens from the reefs of Bonaire, Lesser Antilles, southern Caribbean Sea. Populations of this new species were discovered and photographed in the Bonaire National Marine Park under a large coral ledge, at a depth of 13.7 m, living in crevices known by scuba divers to serve as den to a pair of "flaming reef lobsters" Enoplometopus antillensis, or a "broad banded moray" Channomuraena vittata...
2017: ZooKeys
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28220895/resetting-predator-baselines-in-coral-reef-ecosystems
#6
Darcy Bradley, Eric Conklin, Yannis P Papastamatiou, Douglas J McCauley, Kydd Pollock, Amanda Pollock, Bruce E Kendall, Steven D Gaines, Jennifer E Caselle
What did coral reef ecosystems look like before human impacts became pervasive? Early efforts to reconstruct baselines resulted in the controversial suggestion that pristine coral reefs have inverted trophic pyramids, with disproportionally large top predator biomass. The validity of the coral reef inverted trophic pyramid has been questioned, but until now, was not resolved empirically. We use data from an eight-year tag-recapture program with spatially explicit, capture-recapture models to re-examine the population size and density of a key top predator at Palmyra atoll, the same location that inspired the idea of inverted trophic biomass pyramids in coral reef ecosystems...
February 21, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28220488/optimization-of-foraging-and-diet-by-the-piscivorous-othos-dentex-serranidae
#7
B French, M E Platell, K R Clarke, I C Potter
The aim of this study was to determine the dietary characteristics and mouth morphology of Othos dentex and to use these data, together with in situ observations of feeding behaviour, to elucidate how foraging and diet are optimized by this piscivorous serranid. Seasonal spear and line fishing over reefs in south-western Australia yielded 426 O. dentex (total length, LT , 183-605 mm), among which the stomachs of 95 contained food. The food in the stomachs of 76 fish was sufficiently undigested to be seen to contain, almost invariably, a single fish prey, which was typically identifiable to family and often to species...
February 20, 2017: Journal of Fish Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28209895/seagrass-ecosystems-reduce-exposure-to-bacterial-pathogens-of-humans-fishes-and-invertebrates
#8
Joleah B Lamb, Jeroen A J M van de Water, David G Bourne, Craig Altier, Margaux Y Hein, Evan A Fiorenza, Nur Abu, Jamaluddin Jompa, C Drew Harvell
Plants are important in urban environments for removing pathogens and improving water quality. Seagrass meadows are the most widespread coastal ecosystem on the planet. Although these plants are known to be associated with natural biocide production, they have not been evaluated for their ability to remove microbiological contamination. Using amplicon sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene, we found that when seagrass meadows are present, there was a 50% reduction in the relative abundance of potential bacterial pathogens capable of causing disease in humans and marine organisms...
February 17, 2017: Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28207874/growth-and-life-history-variability-of-the-grey-reef-shark-carcharhinus-amblyrhynchos-across-its-range
#9
Darcy Bradley, Eric Conklin, Yannis P Papastamatiou, Douglas J McCauley, Kydd Pollock, Bruce E Kendall, Steven D Gaines, Jennifer E Caselle
For broadly distributed, often overexploited species such as elasmobranchs (sharks and rays), conservation management would benefit from understanding how life history traits change in response to local environmental and ecological factors. However, fishing obfuscates this objective by causing complex and often mixed effects on the life histories of target species. Disentangling the many drivers of life history variability requires knowledge of elasmobranch populations in the absence of fishing, which is rarely available...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28205543/ontogenetic-loops-in-habitat-use-highlight-the-importance-of-littoral-habitats-for-early-life-stages-of-oceanic-fishes-in-temperate-waters
#10
Patrick Polte, Paul Kotterba, Dorothee Moll, Lena von Nordheim
General concepts of larval fish ecology in temperate oceans predominantly associate dispersal and survival to exogenous mechanisms such as passive drift along ocean currents. However, for tropical reef fish larvae and species in inland freshwater systems behavioural aspects of habitat selection are evidently important components of dispersal. This study is focused on larval Atlantic herring (Clupea harengus) distribution in a Baltic Sea retention area, free of lunar tides and directed current regimes, considered as a natural mesocosm...
February 16, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28178297/the-flashlight-fish-anomalops-katoptron-uses-bioluminescent-light-to-detect-prey-in-the-dark
#11
Jens Hellinger, Peter Jägers, Marcel Donner, Franziska Sutt, Melanie D Mark, Budiono Senen, Ralph Tollrian, Stefan Herlitze
Bioluminescence is a fascinating phenomenon occurring in numerous animal taxa in the ocean. The reef dwelling splitfin flashlight fish (Anomalops katoptron) can be found in large schools during moonless nights in the shallow water of coral reefs and in the open surrounding water. Anomalops katoptron produce striking blink patterns with symbiotic bacteria in their sub-ocular light organs. We examined the blink frequency in A. katoptron under various laboratory conditions. During the night A. katoptron swims in schools roughly parallel to their conspecifics and display high blink frequencies of approximately 90 blinks/minute with equal on and off times...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28168098/identifying-zooplankton-community-changes-between-shallow-and-upper-mesophotic-reefs-on-the-mesoamerican-barrier-reef-caribbean
#12
Dominic A Andradi-Brown, Catherine E I Head, Dan A Exton, Christina L Hunt, Alicia Hendrix, Erika Gress, Alex D Rogers
Mesophotic coral ecosystems (MCEs, reefs 30-150 m) are understudied, yet the limited research conducted has been biased towards large sessile taxa, such as scleractinian corals and sponges, or mobile taxa such as fishes. Here we investigate zooplankton communities on shallow reefs and MCEs around Utila on the southern Mesoamerican Barrier Reef using planktonic light traps. Zooplankton samples were sorted into broad taxonomic groups. Our results indicate similar taxonomic zooplankton richness and overall biomass between shallow reefs and MCEs...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28166257/size-matters-predator-outbreaks-threaten-foundation-species-in-small-marine-protected-areas
#13
Cody S Clements, Mark E Hay
The unanticipated impacts of consumers in fragmented habitats are frequently a challenge for ecosystem management. On Indo-Pacific coral reefs, crown-of-thorns sea stars (Acanthaster spp.) are coral predators whose outbreaks cause precipitous coral decline. Across large spatial scales, Acanthaster densities are lower in large no-take Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and reefs subject to limited human exploitation. However, using a combination of observational and manipulative experiments, we found that Acanthaster densities within a network of small, no-take MPAs on reef flats in Fiji were ~2-3...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28160340/phylogeography-of-the-sergeants-abudefduf-sexfasciatus-and-a-vaigiensis-reveals-complex-introgression-patterns-between-two-widespread-and-sympatric-indo-west-pacific-reef-fishes
#14
Joris A M Bertrand, Philippe Borsa, Wei-Jen Chen
On evolutionary time scales, sea level oscillations lead to recurrent spatio-temporal variation in species distribution and population connectivity. In this situation, applying classical concepts of biogeography is challenging yet necessary to understand the mechanisms underlying biodiversity in highly diverse marine ecosystems such as coral reefs. We aimed at studying the outcomes of such complex biogeographical dynamics on reproductive isolation by sampling populations across a wide spatial range of a species-rich fish genus: the sergeants (Pomacentridae: Abudefduf)...
February 3, 2017: Molecular Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28149703/expanding-our-understanding-of-the-trade-in-marine-aquarium-animals
#15
Andrew L Rhyne, Michael F Tlusty, Joseph T Szczebak, Robert J Holmberg
The trade of live marine animals for home and public aquaria has grown into a major global industry. Millions of marine fishes and invertebrates are removed from coral reefs and associated habitats each year. The majority are imported into the United States, with the remainder sent to Europe, Japan, and a handful of other countries. Despite the recent growth and diversification of the aquarium trade, to date, data collection is not mandatory, and hence comprehensive information on species volume and diversity is lacking...
2017: PeerJ
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28139035/the-threat-to-coral-reefs-from-more-intense-cyclones-under-climate-change
#16
Alistair J Cheal, M Aaron MacNeil, Michael J Emslie, Hugh Sweatman
Ocean warming under climate change threatens coral reefs directly, through fatal heat stress to corals and indirectly, by boosting the energy of cyclones that cause coral destruction and loss of associated organisms. Although cyclone frequency is unlikely to rise, cyclone intensity is predicted to increase globally, causing more frequent occurrences of the most destructive cyclones with potentially severe consequences for coral reef ecosystems. While increasing heat stress is considered a pervasive risk to coral reefs, quantitative estimates of threats from cyclone intensification are lacking due to limited data on cyclone impacts to inform projections...
January 31, 2017: Global Change Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28125690/painted-goby-larvae-under-high-co2-fail-to-recognize-reef-sounds
#17
Joana M Castro, M Clara P Amorim, Ana P Oliveira, Emanuel J Gonçalves, Philip L Munday, Stephen D Simpson, Ana M Faria
Atmospheric CO2 levels have been increasing at an unprecedented rate due to anthropogenic activity. Consequently, ocean pCO2 is increasing and pH decreasing, affecting marine life, including fish. For many coastal marine fishes, selection of the adult habitat occurs at the end of the pelagic larval phase. Fish larvae use a range of sensory cues, including sound, for locating settlement habitat. This study tested the effect of elevated CO2 on the ability of settlement-stage temperate fish to use auditory cues from adult coastal reef habitats...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28125589/habitat-use-and-spatial-variability-of-hawkfishes-with-a-focus-on-colour-polymorphism-in-paracirrhites-forsteri
#18
Darren J Coker, Veronica Chaidez, Michael L Berumen
Identifying relationships between fishes and their environment is an integral part of understanding coral reef ecosystems. However, this information is lacking for many species, particularly in understudied and remote regions. With coral reefs continuing to face environmental pressures, insight into abundance and distribution patterns along with resource use of fish communities will aid in advancing our ecological understanding and management processes. Based on ecological surveys of hawkfish assemblages (Family: Cirrhitidae) in the Red Sea, we reveal distinct patterns in the distribution and abundance across the continental shelf, wave exposure, and with depth, particularly in the four colour morphs of Paracirrhites forsteri...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28122006/small-marine-protected-areas-in-fiji-provide-refuge-for-reef-fish-assemblages-feeding-groups-and-corals
#19
Roberta M Bonaldo, Mathias M Pires, Paulo Roberto Guimarães, Andrew S Hoey, Mark E Hay
The establishment of no-take marine protected areas (MPAs) on coral reefs is a common management strategy for conserving the diversity, abundance, and biomass of reef organisms. Generally, well-managed and enforced MPAs can increase or maintain the diversity and function of the enclosed coral reef, with some of the benefits extending to adjacent non-protected reefs. A fundamental question in coral reef conservation is whether these benefits arise within small MPAs (<1 km2), because larval input of reef organisms is largely decoupled from local adult reproduction...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28118591/coral-reefs-fishing-for-sustainability
#20
Emily S Darling, Stephanie D'agata
Sustainable fisheries must ultimately reduce poverty while maintaining ecosystem productivity. On coral reefs, managing for 'concave' trophic pyramids might be a win-win for people and ecosystems, by providing higher-value fisheries and maintaining important ecological functions.
January 23, 2017: Current Biology: CB
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