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neurology review

Mohammad A Kaisar, Ravi K Sajja, Shikha Prasad, Vinay V Abhyankar, Taylor Liles, Luca Cucullo
The blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a dynamic biological interface which actively controls the passage of substances between the blood and the central nervous system (CNS). From a biological and functional standpoint, the BBB plays a crucial role in maintaining brain homeostasis inasmuch that deterioration of BBB functions are prodromal to many CNS disorders. Conversely, the BBB hinders the delivery of drugs targeting the brain to treat a variety of neurological diseases. Area covered: This article reviews recent technological improvements and innovation in the field of BBB modeling including static and dynamic cell-based platforms, microfluidic systems and the use of stem cells and 3D printing technologies...
October 26, 2016: Expert Opinion on Drug Discovery
Bharat Bhusan Subudhi, Pratap Kumar Sahu
Oxidative stress in brain underlies the major neurological disorders including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD). Peripherally, Angiotensin-II is a major effector of inflammation. Identification of its capacity to access brain during hypertension, as well as location of central rennin angiotensin system have led to its recognition as the major effector of oxidative stress in brain. Clinical uses of antioxidants to antagonize this oxidative stress have mostly failed. In this scenario, AT1 blockers have been investigated to prevent neurodegeneration...
October 24, 2016: Mini Reviews in Medicinal Chemistry
Michael D Daubs, Darrel S Brodke, Prokopis Annis, Brandon D Lawrence
Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective To describe the perioperative complications (0 to 90 days) associated with pedicle subtraction osteotomies (PSOs) performed at a tertiary spine center by two experienced spine surgeons who recently adopted the technique. Methods We reviewed all 65 patients (47 women and 18 men; mean age 60 years, range 24 to 80) who underwent a PSO at our institution. Descriptive data and analysis of complications were limited to the perioperative time (within 90 days of surgery)...
November 2016: Global Spine Journal
Yogi Chang-Yo Hsuan, Cheng-Hsien Lin, Ching-Ping Chang, Mao-Tsun Lin
BACKGROUND: Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has been reported to improve neurological function following neural injury. Many physiological and molecular mechanisms involving MSC therapy-related neuroprotection have been identified. METHODS: A review is presented of articles that pertain to MSC therapy and diverse brain injuries including stroke, neural trauma, and heat stroke, which were identified using an electronic search (e.g., PubMed), emphasize mechanisms of MSC therapy-related neuroprotection...
October 2016: Brain and Behavior
Randall C Edgell, Ahmed E Sarhan, Jazba Soomro, Collin Einertson, Joanna Kemp, Peyman Shirani, Theodore K Malmstrom, Jeroen Coppens
BACKGROUND: Central nervous system vasculitis (CNSV) is a rare disorder, the pathophysiology of which is not fully understood. It involves a combination of inflammation and thrombosis. CNSV is most commonly associated with headache, gradual changes in mental status, and focal neurological symptoms. Diagnosis requires the effective use of history, laboratory testing, imaging, and biopsy. Catheter angiography can be a powerful tool in the diagnosis when common and low-frequency angiographic manifestations of CNSV are considered...
September 2016: Interventional Neurology
Ingo Helbig, Abou Ahmad N Tayoun
Epileptic encephalopathies are severe often intractable seizure disorders where epileptiform abnormalities contribute to a progressive disturbance in brain function. Often, epileptic encephalopathies start in childhood and are accompanied by developmental delay and various neurological and non-neurological comorbidities. In recent years, this concept has become virtually synonymous with a group of severe childhood epilepsies including West syndrome, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, Dravet syndrome, and several other severe childhood epilepsies for which genetic factors are increasingly recognized...
September 2016: Molecular Syndromology
Shahid Bashir, Woo-Kyoung Yoo
The field of neuromodulation encompasses a wide spectrum of interventional technologies that modify the pathological activity within the nervous system to achieve a therapeutic effect. Therapy, including transcranial direct current stimulation, has shown promising results across a range of neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. This article reviews the state-of-the-art of neuromodulation for addiction and discusses the opportunities and challenges available for clinicians and researchers interested in advancing the neuromodulation therapy...
October 2016: Annals of Neurosciences
Kaila A Holtz, Rachel Lipson, Vanessa K Noonan, Brian K Kwon, Patricia B Mills
OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the prevalence and impact of spasticity following traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). DESIGN: Prospective cohort study of the Rick Hansen Spinal Cord Injury Registry (RHSCIR) and retrospective review of inpatient medical charts. SETTING: Quaternary trauma centre, rehabilitation centre, and community settings in British Columbia, Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Individuals with a traumatic SCI between 2005 and 2014 prospectively enrolled in the Vancouver site RHSCIR were eligible for inclusion...
October 22, 2016: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Brit Long, Alex Koyfman
BACKGROUND: Stroke is a leading cause of death and disability and most commonly presents with focal neurologic deficit within a specific vascular distribution. Several other conditions may present in a similar manner. OBJECTIVES: This review provides emergency providers with an understanding of stroke mimics, use of thrombolytics in these mimics, and keys to differentiate true stroke from mimic. DISCUSSION: Stroke has significant morbidity and mortality, and the American Heart Association emphasizes rapid recognition and aggressive treatment for patients with possible stroke-like symptoms, including thrombolytics...
October 22, 2016: Journal of Emergency Medicine
Yoshimichi Hirayama, Yoshiaki Saito, Yoshihiro Maegaki
BACKGROUND: Development of infection-associated acute encephalopathy (AE) is precipitated by several factors, including viral agents, age, and genetic polymorphisms. In addition, children with prior underlying neurological disorders can also present with AE. METHOD: We reviewed 55 children with AE who were referred to hospitals participating in the Status Epilepticus Study Group from 1988 to 2013. AE was classified into eight subtypes: acute encephalopathy with biphasic seizures and late reduced diffusion (AESD); hemiconvulsion-hemiplegia syndrome (HH); acute necrotizing encephalopathy; hemorrhagic shock and encephalopathy syndrome (HSES); clinically mild encephalitis/encephalopathy with a reversible splenial lesion; acute encephalitis with refractory, repetitive partial seizures; Reye-like syndrome; and unclassified...
October 22, 2016: Brain & Development
Sandeep Kandregula, Amey R Savardekar, B N Nandeesh, A Arivazhagan, Malla Bhaskar Rao
Giant hypothalamic hamartomas (GHH) are extremely rare lesions in infants and usually intrinsically epileptogenic. We present the case of a 10-month-old girl child presenting with drug-resistant seizures and a giant hypothalamic lesion that was confirmed as hamartoma on histopathology. Surgical decompression and disconnection from the hypothalamus was performed with the intent of controlling her seizures. Unfortunately, the patient developed right middle cerebral artery and posterior cerebral artery territory infarction, possibly due to vasospasm or thrombosis of the vessels...
October 26, 2016: Pediatric Neurosurgery
Alexander C Schwed, Monica M Boggs, Drew Watanabe, David S Plurad, Brant A Putnam, Dennis Y Kim
Consensus is lacking for ideal management of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) with intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). Patients are often monitored in the intensive care unit (ICU) without additional interventions. We sought to identify admission variables associated with a favorable outcome (ICU admission for 24 hours, no neurosurgical interventions, no complications or mortality) to divert these patients to a non-ICU setting in the future. We reviewed all patients with mTBI [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) = 13-15] and concomitant ICH between July 1, 2012, and June 30, 2015...
October 2016: American Surgeon
Fary Khan, Bhasker Amatya, Mary P Galea, Roman Gonzenbach, Jürg Kesselring
The prevalence of disability due to neurological conditions is escalating worldwide. Neurological disorders have significant disability-burden with long-term functional and psychosocial issues, requiring specialized rehabilitation services for comprehensive management, especially treatments tapping into brain recovery 'neuroplastic' processes. Neurorehabilitation is interdisciplinary and cross-sectorial, requiring coordinated effort of diverse sectors, professions, patients and community to manage complex condition-related disability...
October 24, 2016: Journal of Neurology
Farahnaz Golriz, Lane F Donnelly, Sridevi Devaraj, Raj Krishnamurthy
BACKGROUND: Until recently scurvy has been viewed in developed countries as a disease of the past. More recently there have been reports of case series of children with scurvy who have had a delayed diagnosis after an extensive diagnostic workup that included imaging. Most of these children have had underlying neurologic conditions such as autism. OBJECTIVE: To review the medical records of children diagnosed with vitamin C (ascorbic acid) deficiency based on serum ascorbic acid levels at a large pediatric health care system, to determine imaging findings and utility of imaging in management, and to identify at-risk pediatric populations...
October 24, 2016: Pediatric Radiology
Qian Jiao, Xi-Xun DU, Jun-Xia Xie, Hong Jiang
Neural stem cells (NSCs) offer great promise for the treatment of multiple neurodegenerative diseases. However, the survival and differentiation rates of grafted cells in the host brain need to be enhanced. In this regard, understanding of the underlying mechanism of NSCs survival and death is of great importance for the implications of stem cell-based therapeutic application in the treatments of neurological disorders. Autophagy is a conserved proteolytic mechanism required for maintaining cellular homeostasis, which can affect NSCs fate through regulating their biological behaviors, such as survival and proliferation...
October 25, 2016: Sheng Li Xue Bao: [Acta Physiologica Sinica]
Thomas Flegel, Maria Münch, Karina Held, Florian Salger, Luisa Ziegler, Peter Böttcher
OBJECTIVE: To report feasibility and outcome of multiple thoracolumbar partial lateral corpectomies (TLPLCs) in dogs with predominantly ventral spinal cord compression caused by intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) in the light of reported decreased spinal stability following single TLPLC. Material und methods: In a retrospective study the records of dogs treated by multiple TLPLCs for ventral spinal cord compression caused by Hansen type I or type II IVDD were reviewed. Presurgical spinal cord compression and postsurgical decompression, as well as slot dimensions were determined based on computed tomography (CT)-myelography images...
October 25, 2016: Tierärztliche Praxis. Ausgabe K, Kleintiere/Heimtiere
Vellingiri Balachandar, Venkatesan Dhivya, Mohan Gomathi, Subramaniam Mohanadevi, Balasubramanian Venkatesh, Bharathi Geetha
Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are pluripotent stem cells generated from somatic cells by the introduction of a combination of pluripotency-associated genes such as OCT4, SOX2, along with either KLF4 and c-MYC or NANOG and LIN28 via retroviral or lentiviral vectors. Most importantly, hiPSCs are similar to human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) functionally as they are pluripotent and can potentially differentiate into any desired cell type when provided with the appropriate cues, but do not have the ethical issues surrounding hESCs...
2016: Stem Cell Investigation
Jacinta Nwamaka Nwogu, Qing Ma, Chinedum Peace Babalola, Waheed Adeola Adedeji, Gene D Morse, Babafemi Taiwo
Neurological complications associated with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are a matter of great concern. While antiretroviral (ARV) drugs are the cornerstone of HIV treatment and typically produce neurological benefit, some ARV drugs have limited CNS penetration while others have been associated with neurotoxicity. CNS penetration is a function of several factors including sieving role of blood-brain and blood-CSF barriers and activity of innate drug transporters. Other factors are related to pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics of the specific ARV agent or mediated by drug interactions, local inflammation, and blood flow...
2016: AIDS Research and Treatment
John J Millichap, Roy E Strowd
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 25, 2016: Neurology
Bobby Yanagawa, Gosta B Pettersson, Gilbert Habib, Marc Ruel, Gustavo Saposnik, David A Latter, Subodh Verma
There has been an overall improvement in surgical mortality for patients with infective endocarditis (IE), presumably because of improved diagnosis and management, centered around a more aggressive early surgical approach. Surgery is currently performed in approximately half of all cases of IE. Improved survival in surgery-treated patients is correlated with a reduction in heart failure and the prevention of embolic sequelae. It is reported that between 20% and 40% of patients with IE present with stroke or other neurological conditions...
October 25, 2016: Circulation
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