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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28324983/the-precuneus-may-encode-irrationality-in-human-gambling
#1
P Sacre, M S D Kerr, S Subramanian, K Kahn, J Gonzalez-Martinez, M A Johnson, S V Sarma, J T Gale
Humans often make irrational decisions, especially psychiatric patients who have dysfunctional cognitive and emotional circuitry. Understanding the neural basis of decision-making is therefore essential towards patient management, yet current studies suffer from several limitations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in humans have dominated decision-making neuroscience, but have poor temporal resolution and the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal is only a proxy for neural activity. On the other hand, lesion studies in humans used to infer functionality in decision-making lack characterization of neural activity altogether...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28264981/reason-s-enemy-is-not-emotion-engagement-of-cognitive-control-networks-explains-biases-in-gain-loss-framing
#2
Rosa Li, David V Smith, John A Clithero, Vinod Venkatraman, R McKell Carter, Scott A Huettel
In the classic gain/loss framing effect, describing a gamble as a potential gain or loss biases people to make risk-averse or risk-seeking decisions, respectively. The canonical explanation for this effect is that frames differentially modulate emotional processes - which in turn leads to irrational choice behavior. Here, we evaluate the source of framing biases by integrating functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data from 143 human participants performing a gain/loss framing task with meta-analytic data from over 8000 neuroimaging studies...
March 6, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28242730/behavioural-and-computational-varieties-of-response-inhibition-in-eye-movements
#3
REVIEW
Vassilis Cutsuridis
Response inhibition is the ability to override a planned or an already initiated response. It is the hallmark of executive control as its deficits favour impulsive behaviours, which may be detrimental to an individual's life. This article reviews behavioural and computational guises of response inhibition. It focuses only on inhibition of oculomotor responses. It first reviews behavioural paradigms of response inhibition in eye movement research, namely the countermanding and antisaccade paradigms, both proven to be useful tools for the study of response inhibition in cognitive neuroscience and psychopathology...
April 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28227248/the-precuneus-may-encode-irrationality-in-human-gambling
#4
P Sacre, M S D Kerr, S Subramanian, K Kahn, J Gonzalez-Martinez, M A Johnson, S V Sarma, J T Gale, P Sacre, M S D Kerr, S Subramanian, K Kahn, J Gonzalez-Martinez, M A Johnson, S V Sarma, J T Gale, S Subramanian, M S D Kerr, M A Johnson, J T Gale, K Kahn, P Sacre, S V Sarma, J Gonzalez-Martinez
Humans often make irrational decisions, especially psychiatric patients who have dysfunctional cognitive and emotional circuitry. Understanding the neural basis of decision-making is therefore essential towards patient management, yet current studies suffer from several limitations. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies in humans have dominated decision-making neuroscience, but have poor temporal resolution and the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal is only a proxy for neural activity. On the other hand, lesion studies in humans used to infer functionality in decision-making lack characterization of neural activity altogether...
August 2016: Conference Proceedings: Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28219609/neuroscience-in-gambling-policy-and-treatment-an-interdisciplinary-perspective
#5
REVIEW
Murat Yücel, Adrian Carter, Amy R Allen, Bernard Balleine, Luke Clark, Nicki A Dowling, Sally M Gainsbury, Anna E Goudriaan, Jon Grant, Alan Hayes, David Hodgins, Ruth van Holst, Ralph Lattimore, Charles Livingstone, Valentina Lorenzetti, Dan Lubman, Carsten Murawski, Linden Parkes, Nancy Petry, Robin Room, Bruce Singh, Anna Thomas, Phil Townshend, George Youssef, Wayne Hall
Neuroscientific explanations of gambling disorder can help people make sense of their experiences and guide the development of psychosocial interventions. However, the societal perceptions and implications of these explanations are not always clear or helpful. Two workshops in 2013 and 2014 brought together multidisciplinary researchers aiming to improve the clinical and policy-related effects of neuroscience research on gambling. The workshops revealed that neuroscience can be used to improve identification of the dangers of products used in gambling...
February 14, 2017: Lancet Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28214131/social-decision-making-and-the-brain-a-comparative-perspective
#6
REVIEW
Sébastien Tremblay, K M Sharika, Michael L Platt
The capacity and motivation to be social is a key component of the human adaptive behavioral repertoire. Recent research has identified social behaviors remarkably similar to our own in other animals, including empathy, consolation, cooperation, and strategic deception. Moreover, neurobiological studies in humans, nonhuman primates, and rodents have identified shared brain structures (the so-called 'social brain') apparently specialized to mediate such functions. Neuromodulators may regulate social interactions by 'tuning' the social brain, with important implications for treating social impairments...
February 14, 2017: Trends in Cognitive Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213812/the-neuroscience-of-human-decision-making-through-the-lens-of-learning-and-memory
#7
Lesley K Fellows
We are called upon to make decisions, large and small, many times a day. Whether in the voting booth, the stock exchange, or the cafeteria line, we identify potential options, estimate and compare their subjective values, and make a choice. Decision-making has only recently become a focus for cognitive neuroscience. The last two decades have seen rapid progress in our understanding of the brain basis of at least some aspects of this rather complex aspect of cognition. This work has provided fresh perspectives on poorly understood brain regions, such as orbitofrontal cortex and ventral striatum...
February 18, 2017: Current Topics in Behavioral Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28203355/who-is-the-usual-suspect-evidence-of-a-selection-bias-toward-faces-that-make-direct-eye-contact-in-a-lineup-task
#8
Jessica Taubert, Celine van Golde, Frans A J Verstraten
The speed and ease with which we recognize the faces of our friends and family members belies the difficulty we have recognizing less familiar individuals. Nonetheless, overconfidence in our ability to recognize faces has carried over into various aspects of our legal system; for instance, eyewitness identification serves a critical role in criminal proceedings. For this reason, understanding the perceptual and psychological processes that underlie false identification is of the utmost importance. Gaze direction is a salient social signal and direct eye contact, in particular, is thought to capture attention...
January 2017: I-Perception
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28196280/cuda-based-acceleration-and-bpn-assisted-automation-of-bilateral-filtering-for-brain-mr-image-restoration
#9
Herng-Hua Chang, Yu-Ning Chang
PURPOSE: Bilateral filters have been substantially exploited in numerous magnetic resonance (MR) image restoration applications for decades. Due to the deficiency of theoretical basis on the filter parameter setting, empirical manipulation with fixed values and noise variance related adjustments has generally been employed. The outcome of these strategies is usually sensitive to the variation of the brain structures and not all the three parameter values are optimal. This article is in an attempt to investigate the optimal setting of the bilateral filter, from which an accelerated and automated restoration framework is developed...
February 14, 2017: Medical Physics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28195556/how-neuroscience-can-inform-the-study-of-individual-differences-in-cognitive-abilities
#10
Dennis J McFarland
Theories of human mental abilities should be consistent with what is known in neuroscience. Currently, tests of human mental abilities are modeled by cognitive constructs such as attention, working memory, and speed of information processing. These constructs are in turn related to a single general ability. However, brains are very complex systems and whether most of the variability between the operations of different brains can be ascribed to a single factor is questionable. Research in neuroscience suggests that psychological processes such as perception, attention, decision, and executive control are emergent properties of interacting distributed networks...
February 14, 2017: Reviews in the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28187812/family-discussions-on-life-sustaining-interventions-in-neurocritical-care
#11
REVIEW
M M Adil, D Larriviere
Approximately 20% of all deaths in the USA occur in the intensive care unit (ICU) and the majority of ICU deaths involves decision of de-escalation of life-sustaining interventions. Life-sustaining interventions may include intubation and mechanical ventilation, artificial nutrition and hydration, antibiotic treatment, brain surgery, or vasoactive support. Decision making about goals of care can be defined as an end-of-life communication and the decision-making process between a clinician and a patient (or a surrogate decision maker if the patient is incapable) in an institutional setting to establish a plan of care...
2017: Handbook of Clinical Neurology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28122198/primary-motor-cortex-functionally-contributes-to-language-comprehension-an-online-rtms-study
#12
Nikola Vukovic, Matteo Feurra, Anna Shpektor, Andriy Myachykov, Yury Shtyrov
Among various questions pertinent to grounding human cognitive functions in a neurobiological substrate, the association between language and motor brain structures is a particularly debated one in neuroscience and psychology. While many studies support a broadly distributed model of language and semantics grounded, among other things, in the general modality-specific systems, theories disagree as to whether motor and sensory cortex activity observed during language processing is functional or epiphenomenal...
February 2017: Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28117260/linear-accelerator-radiosurgery-for-arteriovenous-malformations-updated-literature-review
#13
S Yahya, G Heyes, P Nightingale, S Lamin, S Chavda, I Geh, D Spooner, G Cruickshank, P Sanghera
Arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are the leading causing of intra-cerebral haemorrhage. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is an established treatment for arteriovenous malformations (AVM) and commonly delivered using Gamma Knife within dedicated radiosurgery units. Linear accelerator (LINAC) SRS is increasingly available however debate remains over whether it offers an equivalent outcome. The aim of this project is to evaluate the outcomes using LINAC SRS for AVMs used within a UK neurosciences unit and review the literature to aid decision making across various SRS platforms...
April 2017: Journal of Clinical Neuroscience: Official Journal of the Neurosurgical Society of Australasia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28088350/the-emotive-nature-of-conflict-monitoring-in-the-medial-prefrontal-cortex
#14
Blair Saunders, Hause Lin, Marina Milyavskaya, Michael Inzlicht
The detection of conflict between incompatible impulses, thoughts, and actions is a ubiquitous source of motivation across theories of goal-directed action. In this overview, we explore the hypothesis that conflict is emotive, integrating perspectives from affective science and cognitive neuroscience. Initially, we review evidence suggesting that the mental and biological processes that monitor for information processing conflict-particularly those generated by the anterior midcingulate cortex-track the affective significance of conflict and use this signal to motivate increased control...
January 11, 2017: International Journal of Psychophysiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28074581/conflating-capacity-authority-why-we-re-asking-the-wrong-question-in-the-adolescent-decision-making-debate
#15
Erica K Salter
Whether adolescents should be allowed to make their own medical decisions has been a topic of discussion in bioethics for at least two decades now. Are adolescents sufficiently capacitated to make their own medical decisions? Is the mature-minor doctrine, an uncommon legal exception to the rule of parental decision-making authority, something we should expand or eliminate? Bioethicists have dealt with the curious liminality of adolescents-their being neither children nor adults-in a variety of ways. However, recently there has been a trend to rely heavily, and often exclusively, on emerging neuroscientific and psychological data to answer these questions...
January 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28056343/perceptual-decision-making-in-rodents-monkeys-and-humans
#16
REVIEW
Timothy D Hanks, Christopher Summerfield
Perceptual decision making is the process by which animals detect, discriminate, and categorize information from the senses. Over the past two decades, understanding how perceptual decisions are made has become a central theme in the neurosciences. Exceptional progress has been made by recording from single neurons in the cortex of the macaque monkey and using computational models from mathematical psychology to relate these neural data to behavior. More recently, however, the range of available techniques and paradigms has dramatically broadened, and researchers have begun to harness new approaches to explore how rodents and humans make perceptual decisions...
January 4, 2017: Neuron
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28036071/the-interplay-of-hippocampus-and-ventromedial-prefrontal-cortex-in-memory-based-decision-making
#17
REVIEW
Regina A Weilbächer, Sebastian Gluth
Episodic memory and value-based decision making are two central and intensively studied research domains in cognitive neuroscience, but we are just beginning to understand how they interact to enable memory-based decisions. The two brain regions that have been associated with episodic memory and value-based decision making are the hippocampus and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex, respectively. In this review article, we first give an overview of these brain-behavior associations and then focus on the mechanisms of potential interactions between the hippocampus and ventromedial prefrontal cortex that have been proposed and tested in recent neuroimaging studies...
December 29, 2016: Brain Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28030362/the-guilty-brain-the-utility-of-neuroimaging-and-neurostimulation-studies-in-forensic-field
#18
Francesca Mameli, Cristina Scarpazza, Emanuele Tomasini, Roberta Ferrucci, Fabiana Ruggiero, Giuseppe Sartori, Alberto Priori
Several studies have aimed to address the natural inability of humankind to detect deception and accurately discriminate lying from truth in the legal context. To date, it has been well established that telling a lie is a complex mental activity. During deception, many functions of higher cognition are involved: the decision to lie, withholding the truth, fabricating the lie, monitoring whether the receiver believes the lie, and, if necessary, adjusting the fabricated story and maintaining a consistent lie...
February 1, 2017: Reviews in the Neurosciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27982418/a-developmental-neuroscience-study-of-moral-decision-making-regarding-resource-allocation
#19
Kimberly L Meidenbauer, Jason M Cowell, Melanie Killen, Jean Decety
Distinguishing between equity and equality is essential when making social and moral decisions, yet the related neurodevelopmental processes are unknown. Evaluations of contextually based third-party distributions incorporating recipient need and resource importance were examined in children and adolescents (N = 82; 8-16 years). Spatiotemporal neurodynamic responses show distinct developmental profiles to viewing such distributions. Event-related potentials (ERPs) differentially predicted real-life behaviors based on age, where older children's (8-10 years) evaluations were related to a fairly rapid, automatic ERP component (early posterior negativity), whereas adolescent and preadolescent (11-16 years) evaluations, first-person allocations, and prosocial behaviors were predicted by later, cognitively controlled ERP components (P3 and late positive potential)...
December 16, 2016: Child Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27959266/doubt-and-the-decision-making-process-in-obsessive-compulsive-disorder
#20
Gerald Nestadt, Vidyulata Kamath, Brion S Maher, Janice Krasnow, Paul Nestadt, Ying Wang, Arnold Bakker, Jack Samuels
The diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) is based on the presence of specific symptoms and their consequence in the lives of those that exhibit them. It is likely that these symptoms emerge from a neurocognitive vulnerability in the mental life of the individual which has a basis in neurophysiology. The prominence of doubt/uncertainty/lack of confidence (These terms are used interchangeably in this paper.), in the clinical presentation of many patients suffering from OCD leads to our consideration of the cognitive basis for this phenomenon...
November 2016: Medical Hypotheses
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