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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29455864/social-influence-on-positive-youth-development-a-developmental-neuroscience-perspective
#1
Eva H Telzer, Jorien van Hoorn, Christina R Rogers, Kathy T Do
Susceptibility to social influence is associated with a host of negative outcomes during adolescence. However, emerging evidence implicates the role of peers and parents in adolescents' positive and adaptive adjustment. Hence, in this chapter we highlight social influence as an opportunity for promoting social adjustment, which can redirect negative trajectories and help adolescents thrive. We discuss influential models about the processes underlying social influence, with a particular emphasis on internalizing social norms, embedded in social learning and social identity theory...
2018: Advances in Child Development and Behavior
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29432037/applying-a-cognitive-neuroscience-perspective-to-disruptive-behavior-disorders-implications-for-schools
#2
Patrick M Tyler, Stuart F White, Ronald W Thompson, R J R Blair
A cognitive neuroscience perspective seeks to understand behavior, in this case disruptive behavior disorders (DBD), in terms of dysfunction in cognitive processes underpinned by neural processes. While this type of approach has clear implications for clinical mental health practice, it also has implications for school-based assessment and intervention with children and adolescents who have disruptive behavior and aggression. This review articulates a cognitive neuroscience account of DBD by discussing the neurocognitive dysfunction related to emotional empathy, threat sensitivity, reinforcement-based decision-making, and response inhibition...
February 12, 2018: Developmental Neuropsychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29427079/dopamine-and-response-selection-an-acute-phenylalanine-tyrosine-depletion-study
#3
Céline Ramdani, Franck Vidal, Alain Dagher, Laurence Carbonnell, Thierry Hasbroucq
The role of dopaminergic system in decision-making is well documented, and evidence suggests that it could play a significant role in response selection processes. The N-40 is a fronto-central event-related potential, generated by the supplementary motor areas (SMAs) and a physiological index of response selection processes. The aim of the present study was to determine whether infraclinical effects of dopamine depletion on response selection processes could be evidenced via alterations of the N-40. We obtained a dopamine depletion in healthy volunteers with the acute phenylalanine and tyrosine depletion (APTD) method which consists in decreasing the availability of dopamine precursors...
February 9, 2018: Psychopharmacology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29341513/investment-in-epilepsy-monitoring-units-improves-epilepsy-care-experience-in-a-regional-neuroscience-centre
#4
R N McGinty, D J Costello, B McNamara, P Kinirons, B J Sweeney
An evaluation of the clinical yield of inpatient long-term video-EEG (vEEG) in a new epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) was undertaken, with findings compared to the centre's prior method of bedside vEEG recording in a standard neurology ward, as reported in 2004. A retrospective analysis of neurophysiology reports for all adults who underwent elective vEEG monitoring in the EMU at Cork University Hospital between January 2015 and July 2016 was conducted. Of 115 vEEG studies in the EMU, 100 (87.0%) were deemed diagnostically conclusive, 14 (12...
August 8, 2017: Irish Medical Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29330241/primary-care-physician-involvement-in-shared-decision-making-for-critically-ill-patients-and-family-satisfaction-with-care
#5
Kevin B Huang, Urs Weber, Jennifer Johnson, Nathanial Anderson, Andrea K Knies, Belinda Nhundu, Cynthia Bautista, Kelly Poskus, Kevin N Sheth, David Y Hwang
PURPOSE: An intensive care unit (ICU) patient's primary care physician (PCP) may be able to assist family with certain ICU shared medical decisions. We explored whether families of patients in nonopen ICUs who nevertheless report involvement of a patient's PCP in medical decision making are more satisfied with ICU shared decision making than families who do not. METHODS: Between March 2013 and December 2015, we administered the Family Satisfaction in the ICU 24 survey to family members of adult neuroscience ICU patients...
January 2018: Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine: JABFM
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29322967/alternative-bibliometrics-from-the-web-of-knowledge-surpasses-the-impact-factor-in-a-2-year-ahead-annual-citation-calculation-linear-mixed-design-models-analysis-of-neuroscience-journals
#6
Araceli Diaz-Ruiz, Ulises Orbe-Arteaga, Camilo Rios, Ernesto Roldan-Valadez
CONTEXT: The decision about which journal to choose for the publication of research deserves further investigation. AIMS: In this study, we evaluate the predictive ability of seven bibliometrics in the Web of Knowledge to calculate total cites over a 7-year period in neuroscience journals. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: Coincidental bibliometrics appearing during 2007, 2008, 2009, 2010, and 2011, along with their corresponding cites in 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, and 2013, were recorded from the journal citation reports (JCR) Science Edition...
January 2018: Neurology India
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29297140/embedding-anatomical-or-functional-knowledge-in-whole-brain-multiple-kernel-learning-models
#7
Jessica Schrouff, J M Monteiro, L Portugal, M J Rosa, C Phillips, J Mourão-Miranda
Pattern recognition models have been increasingly applied to neuroimaging data over the last two decades. These applications have ranged from cognitive neuroscience to clinical problems. A common limitation of these approaches is that they do not incorporate previous knowledge about the brain structure and function into the models. Previous knowledge can be embedded into pattern recognition models by imposing a grouping structure based on anatomically or functionally defined brain regions. In this work, we present a novel approach that uses group sparsity to model the whole brain multivariate pattern as a combination of regional patterns...
January 3, 2018: Neuroinformatics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29260439/eye-movement-research-in-the-twenty-first-century-a-window-to-the-brain-mind-and-more
#8
EDITORIAL
Aasef G Shaikh, David S Zee
The study of eye movements not only addresses debilitating neuro-ophthalmological problems but has become an essential tool of basic neuroscience research. Eye movements are a classic way to evaluate brain function-traditionally in disorders affecting the brainstem and cerebellum. Abnormalities of eye movements have localizing value and help narrow the differential diagnosis of complex neurological problems. More recently, using sophisticated behavioral paradigms, measurement of eye movements has also been applied to disorders of the thalamus, basal ganglia, and cerebral cortex...
December 19, 2017: Cerebellum
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29213489/in-search-of-the-moral-psychological-and-neuroevolutionary-basis-of-political-partisanship
#9
REVIEW
Vitor Geraldi Haase, Isabella Starling-Alves
In many countries, a radical political divide brings several socially relevant decisions to a standstill. Could cognitive, affective and social (CAS) neuroscience help better understand these questions? The present article reviews the moral-psychological and neuroevolutionary basis of the political partisanship divide. A non-systematic literature review and a conceptual analysis were conducted. Three main points are identified and discussed: 1) Political partisan behavior rests upon deep moral emotions. It is automatically processed and impervious to contradiction...
January 2017: Dementia & Neuropsychologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29203854/distributed-neural-representation-of-saliency-controlled-value-and-category-during-anticipation-of-rewards-and-punishments
#10
Zhihao Zhang, Jennifer Fanning, Daniel B Ehrlich, Wenting Chen, Daeyeol Lee, Ifat Levy
An extensive literature from cognitive neuroscience examines the neural representation of value, but interpretations of these existing results are often complicated by the potential confound of saliency. At the same time, recent attempts to dissociate neural signals of value and saliency have not addressed their relationship with category information. Using a multi-category valuation task that incorporates rewards and punishments of different nature, we identify distributed neural representation of value, saliency, and category during outcome anticipation...
December 4, 2017: Nature Communications
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29193776/bayesian-statistical-approaches-to-evaluating-cognitive-models
#11
REVIEW
Jeffrey Annis, Thomas J Palmeri
Cognitive models aim to explain complex human behavior in terms of hypothesized mechanisms of the mind. These mechanisms can be formalized in terms of mathematical structures containing parameters that are theoretically meaningful. For example, in the case of perceptual decision making, model parameters might correspond to theoretical constructs like response bias, evidence quality, response caution, and the like. Formal cognitive models go beyond verbal models in that cognitive mechanisms are instantiated in terms of mathematics and they go beyond statistical models in that cognitive model parameters are psychologically interpretable...
November 28, 2017: Wiley Interdisciplinary Reviews. Cognitive Science
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29190328/the-computational-anatomy-of-visual-neglect
#12
Thomas Parr, Karl J Friston
Visual neglect is a debilitating neuropsychological phenomenon that has many clinical implications and-in cognitive neuroscience-offers an important lesion deficit model. In this article, we describe a computational model of visual neglect based upon active inference. Our objective is to establish a computational and neurophysiological process theory that can be used to disambiguate among the various causes of this important syndrome; namely, a computational neuropsychology of visual neglect. We introduce a Bayes optimal model based upon Markov decision processes that reproduces the visual searches induced by the line cancellation task (used to characterize visual neglect at the bedside)...
November 28, 2017: Cerebral Cortex
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29180789/the-computations-that-support-simple-decision-making-a-comparison-between-the-diffusion-and-urgency-gating-models
#13
Nathan J Evans, Guy E Hawkins, Udo Boehm, Eric-Jan Wagenmakers, Scott D Brown
We investigate a question relevant to the psychology and neuroscience of perceptual decision-making: whether decisions are based on steadily accumulating evidence, or only on the most recent evidence. We report an empirical comparison between two of the most prominent examples of these theoretical positions, the diffusion model and the urgency-gating model, via model-based qualitative and quantitative comparisons. Our findings support the predictions of the diffusion model over the urgency-gating model, and therefore, the notion that evidence accumulates without much decay...
November 27, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29163069/notes-on-the-recent-history-of-neuroscience-in-africa
#14
REVIEW
Vivienne A Russell
Neuroscience began with neuroanatomy and neurosurgery in Egypt more than 5000 years ago. Knowledge grew over time and specialized neurosurgery centers were established in north Africa in the eleventh century. However, it was not until the twentieth century that neuroscience research became established in sub-Saharan Africa. In most African countries, clinical research focused on understanding the rationale and improving treatment of epilepsy, infections, nutritional neuropathies, stroke and tumors. Significant advances were made...
2017: Frontiers in Neuroanatomy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29134192/problems-and-progress-regarding-sex-bias-and-omission-in-neuroscience-research
#15
Tyler R Will, Stephanie B Proaño, Anly M Thomas, Lindsey M Kunz, Kelly C Thompson, Laura A Ginnari, Clay H Jones, Sarah-Catherine Lucas, Elizabeth M Reavis, David M Dorris, John Meitzen
Neuroscience research has historically ignored female animals. This neglect comes in two general forms. The first is sex bias, defined as favoring one sex over another; in this case, male over female. The second is sex omission, which is the lack of reporting sex. The recognition of this phenomenon has generated fierce debate across the sciences. Here we test whether sex bias and omission are still present in the neuroscience literature, whether studies employing both males and females neglect sex as an experimental variable, and whether sex bias and omission differs between animal models and journals...
November 2017: ENeuro
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29122592/new-perspectives-on-the-brain-lesion-approach-implications-for-theoretical-models-of-human-memory
#16
Muireann Irish, Marlieke T R van Kesteren
Human lesion studies represent the cornerstone of modern day neuropsychology and provide an important adjunct to functional neuroimaging methods. The study of human lesion groups with damage to distinct regions of the brain permits the identification of underlying mechanisms and structures not only associated with, but essential for, complex cognitive processes. Here, we consider a recent review by McCormick et al. in which the power of the lesion model approach is elegantly presented with respect to a host of sophisticated cognitive endeavors, including autobiographical memory, future thinking, spatial navigation, and decision-making...
November 6, 2017: Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29118213/volition-and-action-in-the-human-brain-processes-pathologies-and-reasons
#17
Itzhak Fried, Patrick Haggard, Biyu J He, Aaron Schurger
Humans seem to decide for themselves what to do, and when to do it. This distinctive capacity may emerge from an ability, shared with other animals, to make decisions for action that are related to future goals, or at least free from the constraints of immediate environmental inputs. Studying such volitional acts proves a major challenge for neuroscience. This review highlights key mechanisms in the generation of voluntary, as opposed to stimulus-driven actions, and highlights three issues. The first part focuses on the apparent spontaneity of voluntary action...
November 8, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29111450/interpersonal-dysfunction-in-borderline-personality-a-decision-neuroscience-perspective
#18
REVIEW
Michael N Hallquist, Nathan T Hall, Alison M Schreiber, Alexandre Y Dombrovski
Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is characterized by disadvantageous decisions that are often expressed in close relationships and associated with intense negative emotions. Although functional neuroimaging studies of BPD have described regions associated with altered social cognition and emotion processing, these correlates do not inform an understanding of how brain activity leads to maladaptive choices. Drawing on recent research, we argue that formal models of decision-making are crucial to elaborating theories of BPD that bridge psychological constructs, behavior, and neural systems...
September 23, 2017: Current Opinion in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29079687/optogenetic-inhibition-reveals-distinct-roles-for-basolateral-amygdala-activity-at-discrete-timepoints-during-risky-decision-making
#19
Caitlin A Orsini, Caesar M Hernandez, Sarthak Singhal, Kyle B Kelly, Charles J Frazier, Jennifer L Bizon, Barry Setlow
Decision making is a multifaceted process, consisting of several distinct phases that likely require different cognitive operations. Previous work showed that the basolateral amygdala (BLA) is a critical substrate for decision making involving risk of punishment; however, it is unclear how the BLA is recruited at different stages of the decision process. To this end, the current study used optogenetics to inhibit the BLA during specific task phases in a model of risky decision making (Risky Decision-making Task; RDT) in which rats choose between a small, "safe" reward and a large reward accompanied by varying probabilities of footshock punishment...
October 27, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29067130/a-decision-making-model-based-on-a-spiking-neural-circuit-and-synaptic-plasticity
#20
Hui Wei, Yijie Bu, Dawei Dai
To adapt to the environment and survive, most animals can control their behaviors by making decisions. The process of decision-making and responding according to cues in the environment is stable, sustainable, and learnable. Understanding how behaviors are regulated by neural circuits and the encoding and decoding mechanisms from stimuli to responses are important goals in neuroscience. From results observed in Drosophila experiments, the underlying decision-making process is discussed, and a neural circuit that implements a two-choice decision-making model is proposed to explain and reproduce the observations...
October 2017: Cognitive Neurodynamics
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