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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28339401/is-huntingtin-dispensable-in-the-adult-brain
#1
Jeh-Ping Liu, Scott O Zeitlin
Huntingtin (HTT) is an essential protein during early embryogenesis and the development of the central nervous system (CNS). Conditional knock-out of mouse Huntingtin (Htt) expression in the CNS beginning during neural development, as well as reducing Htt expression only during embryonic and early postnatal stages, results in neurodegeneration in the adult brain. These findings suggest that HTT is important for the development and/or maintenance of the CNS, but they do not address the question of whether HTT is required specifically in the adult CNS for its normal functions and/or homeostasis...
March 21, 2017: Journal of Huntington's Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28339398/n-terminal-fragments-of-huntingtin-longer-than-residue-170-form-visible-aggregates-independently-to-polyglutamine-expansion
#2
Moore Z Chen, Sue-Ann Mok, Angelique R Ormsby, Paul J Muchowski, Danny M Hatters
BACKGROUND: A hallmark of Huntington's disease is the progressive aggregation of full length and N-terminal fragments of polyglutamine (polyQ)-expanded Huntingtin (Htt) into intracellular inclusions. The production of N-terminal fragments appears important for enabling pathology and aggregation; and hence the direct expression of a variety of N-terminal fragments are commonly used to model HD in animal and cellular models. OBJECTIVE: It remains unclear how the length of the N-terminal fragments relates to polyQ - mediated aggregation...
March 22, 2017: Journal of Huntington's Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334820/high-resolution-time-course-mapping-of-early-transcriptomic-molecular-and-cellular-phenotypes-in-huntington-s-disease-cag-knock-in-mice-across-multiple-genetic-backgrounds
#3
Seth A Ament, Jocelynn R Pearl, Andrea Grindeland, Jason St Claire, John C Earls, Marina Kovalenko, Tammy Gillis, Jayalakshmi Mysore, James F Gusella, Jong-Min Lee, Seung Kwak, David Howland, Min Young Lee, David Baxter, Kelsey Scherler, Kai Wang, Donald Geman, Jeffrey B Carroll, Marcy E MacDonald, George Carlson, Vanessa C Wheeler, Nathan D Price, Leroy E Hood
Huntington's disease is a dominantly inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat in the HTT gene. In addition to the length of the CAG expansion, factors such as genetic background have been shown to contribute to the age at onset of neurological symptoms. A central challenge in understanding the disease progression that leads from the HD mutation to massive cell death in the striatum is the ability to characterize the subtle and early functional consequences of the CAG expansion longitudinally...
February 27, 2017: Human Molecular Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334749/ctg-repeat-targeting-oligonucleotides-for-down-regulating-huntingtin-expression
#4
Eman M Zaghloul, Olof Gissberg, Pedro M D Moreno, Lee Siggens, Mattias Hällbrink, Anna S Jørgensen, Karl Ekwall, Rula Zain, Jesper Wengel, Karin E Lundin, C I Edvard Smith
Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal, neurodegenerative disorder in which patients suffer from mobility, psychological and cognitive impairments. Existing therapeutics are only symptomatic and do not significantly alter the disease progression or increase life expectancy. HD is caused by expansion of the CAG trinucleotide repeat region in exon 1 of the Huntingtin gene (HTT), leading to the formation of mutant HTT transcripts (muHTT). The toxic gain-of-function of muHTT protein is a major cause of the disease...
February 17, 2017: Nucleic Acids Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334491/mutant-exon1-huntingtin-aggregation-is-regulated-by-t3-phosphorylation-induced-structural-changes-and-crosstalk-between-t3-phosphorylation-and-acetylation-at-k6
#5
Anass Chiki, Sean M DeGuire, Francesco S Ruggeri, Domenico Sanfelice, Annalisa Ansaloni, Zhe-Ming Wang, Urszula Cendrowska, Ritwik Burai, Sophie Vieweg, Annalisa Pastore, Giovanni Dietler, Hilal A Lashuel
Herein, we used protein semisynthesis to investigate, for the first time, the effect of lysine acetylation and phosphorylation, as well as the crosstalk between these modifications on the structure and aggregation of mutant huntingtin exon1 (Httex1). Our results demonstrate that phosphorylation at T3 stabilizes the α-helical conformation of the N-terminal 17 amino acids (Nt17) and significantly inhibits the aggregation of mutant Httex1. Acetylation of single lysine residues, K6, K9 or K15, had no effect on Httex1 aggregation...
March 23, 2017: Angewandte Chemie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28319609/developmental-alterations-in-huntington-s-disease-neural-cells-and-pharmacological-rescue-in-cells-and-mice
#6
(no author information available yet)
Neural cultures derived from Huntington's disease (HD) patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells were used for 'omics' analyses to identify mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. RNA-seq analysis identified genes in glutamate and GABA signaling, axonal guidance and calcium influx whose expression was decreased in HD cultures. One-third of gene changes were in pathways regulating neuronal development and maturation. When mapped to stages of mouse striatal development, the profiles aligned with earlier embryonic stages of neuronal differentiation...
March 20, 2017: Nature Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28319202/evolving-notch-polyq-tracts-reveal-possible-solenoid-interference-elements
#7
Albert J Erives
Polyglutamine (polyQ) tracts in regulatory proteins are extremely polymorphic. As functional elements under selection for length, triplet repeats are prone to DNA replication slippage and indel mutations. Many polyQ tracts are also embedded within intrinsically disordered domains, which are less constrained, fast evolving, and difficult to characterize. To identify structural principles underlying polyQ tracts in disordered regulatory domains, here I analyze deep evolution of metazoan Notch polyQ tracts, which can generate alleles causing developmental and neurogenic defects...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28306505/identification-of-an-rna-polymerase-iii-regulator-linked-to-disease-associated-protein-aggregation
#8
Olga Sin, Tristan de Jong, Alejandro Mata-Cabana, Michelle Kudron, Mohamad Amr Zaini, Francesco A Aprile, Renée I Seinstra, Esther Stroo, Roméo Willinge Prins, Céline N Martineau, Hai Hui Wang, Wytse Hogewerf, Anne Steinhof, Erich E Wanker, Michele Vendruscolo, Cornelis F Calkhoven, Valerie Reinke, Victor Guryev, Ellen A A Nollen
Protein aggregation is associated with age-related neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and polyglutamine diseases. As a causal relationship between protein aggregation and neurodegeneration remains elusive, understanding the cellular mechanisms regulating protein aggregation will help develop future treatments. To identify such mechanisms, we conducted a forward genetic screen in a C. elegans model of polyglutamine aggregation and identified the protein MOAG-2/LIR-3 as a driver of protein aggregation...
March 16, 2017: Molecular Cell
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303108/transcriptional-signature-of-an-altered-purine-metabolism-in-the-skeletal-muscle-of-a-huntington-s-disease-mouse-model
#9
Michal Mielcarek, Ryszard T Smolenski, Mark Isalan
Huntington's disease (HD) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder, caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein (HTT). HD has a peripheral component to its pathology: skeletal muscles are severely affected, leading to atrophy, and malfunction in both pre-clinical and clinical settings. We previously used two symptomatic HD mouse models to demonstrate the impairment of the contractile characteristics of the hind limb muscles, which was accompanied by a significant loss of function of motor units...
2017: Frontiers in Physiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28300621/acute-exposure-to-chlorpyrifos-caused-nadph-oxidase-mediated-oxidative-stress-and-neurotoxicity-in-a-striatal-cell-model-of-huntington-s-disease
#10
Gifty A Dominah, Rachael A McMinimy, Sallay Kallon, Gunnar F Kwakye
We hypothesized that expression of mutant Huntingtin (HTT) would modulate the neurotoxicity of the commonly used organophosphate insecticide, chlorpyrifos (CPF), revealing cellular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration. Using a mouse striatal cell model of HD, we report that mutant HD cells are more susceptible to CPF-induced cytotoxicity as compared to wild-type. This CPF-induced cytotoxicity caused increased production of reactive oxygen species, reduced glutathione levels, decreased superoxide dismutase activity, and increased malondialdehyde levels in mutant HD cells relative to wild-type...
March 11, 2017: Neurotoxicology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28288000/age-associated-chromatin-relaxation-is-enhanced-in-huntington-s-disease-mice
#11
Myungsun Park, Byungkuk Min, Kyuheum Jeon, Sunwha Cho, Jung Sun Park, Jisun Kim, Jeha Jeon, Jinhoi Song, Seokho Kim, Sangkyun Jeong, Hyemyung Seo, Yong-Kook Kang
Expansion of polyglutamine stretch in the huntingtin (HTT) protein is a major cause of Huntington's disease (HD). The polyglutamine part in HTT interacts with various proteins implicated in epigenetic regulation of genes, suggesting that mutant HTT may disturb the integrity of the epigenetic system. Here, we used a PCRseq-based method to examine expression profile of 395 exonic segments from 260 "epi-driver" genes in splenic T lymphocytes from aged HD mice. We identified 67 exonic segments differentially expressed between young and aged HD mice, most of them upregulated in the aged...
March 12, 2017: Aging
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28286179/formation-of-hippocampal-mhtt-aggregates-leads-to-impaired-spatial-memory-hippocampal-activation-and-adult-neurogenesis
#12
L C Schwab, K Richetin, R A Barker, N Déglon
Huntington's disease (HD) is a genetic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a triad of motor, psychiatric and cognitive deficits with the latter classically attributed to disruption of fronto-striatal circuits. However, emerging evidence suggests that some of the cognitive deficits in HD may have their origin in other structures including the hippocampus. Hippocampal abnormalities have been reported in HD mouse models particularly in terms of performance on the Morris Water Maze. However, in these animals, it is difficult to be certain whether the spatial memory deficits are due to local pathology within this structure or their poor mobility and motivation...
March 9, 2017: Neurobiology of Disease
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28282438/a-new-caenorhabditis-elegans-model-of-human-huntingtin-513-aggregation-and-toxicity-in-body-wall-muscles
#13
Amy L Lee, Hailey M Ung, L Paul Sands, Elise A Kikis
Expanded polyglutamine repeats in different proteins are the known determinants of at least nine progressive neurodegenerative disorders whose symptoms include cognitive and motor impairment that worsen as patients age. One such disorder is Huntington's Disease (HD) that is caused by a polyglutamine expansion in the human huntingtin protein (htt). The polyglutamine expansion destabilizes htt leading to protein misfolding, which in turn triggers neurodegeneration and the disruption of energy metabolism in muscle cells...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28272865/sugar-terminated-nanoparticle-chaperones-are-102-105-times-better-than-molecular-sugars-in-inhibiting-protein-aggregation-and-lowering-of-amyloidogenic-cytotoxicity
#14
Nibedita Pradhan, Shashi Shekhar, Nihar R Jana, Nikhil R Jana
Sugar-based osmolyte molecules are known to stabilize proteins under stress but usually they have poor chaperone performance in inhibiting protein aggregation. Here we show that nanoparticle form of sugar molecule can enhance their chaperone performance typically by 102 to 105 times as compared to molecular sugar. Sugar-based nanoparticles of 20-40 nm size have been synthesized by simple heating of acidic aqueous solution of glucose/sucrose/maltose/trehalose. These nanoparticles have excitation dependent green/yellow/orange emission and surface chemistry identical to respective sugar molecule...
March 8, 2017: ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28270748/huntingtin-is-required-for-neural-but-not-cardiac-pancreatic-progenitor-differentiation-of-mouse-embryonic-stem-cells-in-vitro
#15
Man Shan Yu, Naoko Tanese
Mutation in the huntingtin (HTT) gene causes Huntington's disease (HD). It is an autosomal dominant trinucleotide-repeat expansion disease in which CAG repeat sequence expands to >35. This results in the production of mutant HTT protein with an increased stretch of glutamines near the N-terminus. The wild type HTT gene encodes a 350 kD protein whose function remains elusive. Mutant HTT protein has been implicated in transcription, axonal transport, cytoskeletal structure/function, signal transduction, and autophagy...
2017: Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28265888/huntington-disease-linking-pathogenesis-to-the-development-of-experimental-therapeutics
#16
REVIEW
Tiago A Mestre, Cristina Sampaio
Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG trinucleotide expansion in the huntingtin gene. At present, the HD field is experiencing exciting times with the assessment for the first time in human subjects of interventions aimed at core disease mechanisms. Out of a portfolio of interventions that claim a potential disease-modifying effect in HD, the target huntingtin has more robust validation. In this review, we discuss the spectrum of huntingtin-lowering therapies that are currently being considered...
February 2017: Current Neurology and Neuroscience Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28263187/aggregation-of-scaffolding-protein-disc1-dysregulates-phosphodiesterase-4-in-huntington-s-disease
#17
Motomasa Tanaka, Koko Ishizuka, Yoko Nekooki-Machida, Ryo Endo, Noriko Takashima, Hideyuki Sasaki, Yusuke Komi, Amy Gathercole, Elaine Huston, Kazuhiro Ishii, Kelvin Kai-Wan Hui, Masaru Kurosawa, Sun-Hong Kim, Nobuyuki Nukina, Eiki Takimoto, Miles D Houslay, Akira Sawa
Huntington's disease (HD) is a polyglutamine (polyQ) disease caused by aberrant expansion of the polyQ tract in Huntingtin (HTT). While motor impairment mediated by polyQ-expanded HTT has been intensively studied, molecular mechanisms for nonmotor symptoms in HD, such as psychiatric manifestations, remain elusive. Here we have demonstrated that HTT forms a ternary protein complex with the scaffolding protein DISC1 and cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) to regulate PDE4 activity. We observed pathological cross-seeding between DISC1 and mutant HTT aggregates in the brains of HD patients as well as in a murine model that recapitulates the polyQ pathology of HD (R6/2 mice)...
March 6, 2017: Journal of Clinical Investigation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28259758/huntingtin-associated-protein-1-hap1-regulates-endocytosis-and-interacts-with-multiple-trafficking-related-proteins
#18
Kimberly D Mackenzie, Yoon Lim, Michael D Duffield, Timothy Chataway, Xin-Fu Zhou, Damien J Keating
Huntingtin-associated protein 1 (HAP1) was initially identified as a binding partner of huntingtin, mutations in which underlie Huntington's disease. Subcellular localization and protein interaction data indicate that HAP1 may be important in vesicle trafficking, cell signalling and receptor internalization. In this study, a proteomics approach was used for the identification of novel HAP1-interacting partners to attempt to shed light on the physiological function of HAP1. Using affinity chromatography with HAP1-GST protein fragments bound to Sepharose columns, this study identified a number of trafficking-related proteins that bind to HAP1...
March 1, 2017: Cellular Signalling
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28235896/pathogenic-huntington-alters-bmp-signaling-and-synaptic-growth-through-local-disruptions-of-endosomal-compartments
#19
Yulia Akbergenova, J Troy Littleton
Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of a polyglutamine (polyQ) stretch within the Huntingtin (Htt) protein. Pathogenic Htt disrupts multiple neuronal processes, including gene expression, axonal trafficking, proteasome and mitochondrial activity, and intracellular vesicle trafficking. However, the primary pathogenic mechanism and subcellular site of action for mutant Htt are still unclear. Using a Drosophila HD model, we found that pathogenic Htt expression leads to a profound overgrowth of synaptic connections that directly correlates with the levels of Htt at nerve terminals...
February 24, 2017: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28213125/reduced-bioavailable-manganese-causes-striatal-urea-cycle-pathology-in-huntington-s-disease-mouse-model
#20
Terry Jo V Bichell, Michal Wegrzynowicz, K Grace Tipps, Emma M Bradley, Michael A Uhouse, Miles Bryan, Kyle Horning, Nicole Fisher, Karrie Dudek, Timothy Halbesma, Preethi Umashanker, Andrew D Stubbs, Hunter K Holt, Gunnar F Kwakye, Andrew M Tidball, Roger J Colbran, Michael Aschner, M Diana Neely, Alba Di Pardo, Vittorio Maglione, Alexander Osmand, Aaron B Bowman
Huntington's disease (HD) is caused by a mutation in the huntingtin gene (HTT), resulting in profound striatal neurodegeneration through an unknown mechanism. Perturbations in the urea cycle have been reported in HD models and in HD patient blood and brain. In neurons, arginase is a central urea cycle enzyme, and the metal manganese (Mn) is an essential cofactor. Deficient biological responses to Mn, and reduced Mn accumulation have been observed in HD striatal mouse and cell models. Here we report in vivo and ex vivo evidence of a urea cycle metabolic phenotype in a prodromal HD mouse model...
February 14, 2017: Biochimica et Biophysica Acta
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