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Robert P Ellis, Mauricio A Urbina, Rod W Wilson
Exponentially rising CO2 (currently ~400 μatm) is driving climate change and causing acidification of both marine and freshwater environments. Physiologists have long known that CO2 directly affects acid-base and ion regulation, respiratory function and aerobic performance in aquatic animals. More recently, many studies have demonstrated that elevated CO2 projected for end of this century (e.g. 800-1000 μatm) can also impact physiology, and have substantial effects on behaviours linked to sensory stimuli (smell, hearing and vision) both having negative implications for fitness and survival...
October 20, 2016: Global Change Biology
J Casey, E Jardim, J Th Martinsohn
Exploitation of fish and shellfish stocks by the European Union fishing fleet is managed under the Common Fisheries Policy (CFP), which aims to ensure that fishing and aquaculture are environmentally, economically and socially sustainable and that they provide a source of healthy food for E.U. citizens. A notable feature of the CFP is its legally enshrined requirement for sound scientific advice to underpin its objectives. The CFP was first conceived in 1970 when it formed part of the Common Agricultural Policy...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Fish Biology
Deliang Li, Jie Pi, Jianping Wang, Pengfei Zhu, Liuping Lei, Ting Zhang, Deming Liu
Discovering cost effective strategies to reduce cadmium (Cd) uptake is of great concern for consumer food safety in the aquaculture industry. This study investigated the protective effects of calcium (Ca) on Cd uptake in co-cultured silver carp (Hypophthalmichthys molitrix) and triangle sail mussel (Hyriopsis cumingii). The results show that Ca-depending on its applied concentration-caused a significant decrease in the Cd uptake into muscle (by 48 %-72 %), gills (by 51 %-57 %), liver (by 52 %-81 %) and kidney (by 54 %-81 %) of silver carp (p < 0...
October 19, 2016: Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
Jiraporn Jarungsriapisit, Lindsey J Moore, Stig Mæhle, Cecilie Skår, Ann Cathrine Einen, Ingrid Uglenes Fiksdal, Hugh Craig Morton, Sigurd O Stefansson, Geir Lasse Taranger, Sonal Patel
Salmonid alphavirus subtype 3 (SAV3) causes pancreas disease (PD) and adversely affects salmonid aquaculture in Europe. A better understanding of disease transmission is currently needed in order to manage PD outbreaks. Here, we demonstrate the relationship between viral dose and the outcome of SAV3 infection in Atlantic salmon post-smolts using a bath challenge model. Fish were challenged at 12 °C with 3 different SAV3 doses; 139, 27 and 7 TCID50 L(-1) of seawater. A dose of as little as 7 TCID50 L(-1) of seawater was able to induce SAV3 infection in the challenged population with a substantial level of variation between replicate tanks and, therefore, likely represents a dose close to the minimum dose required to establish an infection in a population...
October 19, 2016: Veterinary Research
Michael Cieslak, Susie S Mikkelsen, Helle F Skall, Marine Baud, Nicolas Diserens, Marc Y Engelsma, Olga L M Haenen, Shirin Mousakhani, Valentina Panzarin, Thomas Wahli, Niels J Olesen, Heike Schütze
One of the most valuable aquaculture fish in Europe is the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, but the profitability of trout production is threatened by a highly lethal infectious disease, viral hemorrhagic septicemia (VHS), caused by the VHS virus (VHSV). For the past few decades, the subgenogroup Ia of VHSV has been the main cause of VHS outbreaks in European freshwater-farmed rainbow trout. Little is currently known, however, about the phylogenetic radiation of this Ia lineage into subordinate Ia clades and their subsequent geographical spread routes...
2016: PloS One
R K Bhomia, R A MacKenzie, D Murdiyarso, S D Sasmito, J Purbopuspito
Globally, mangrove forests represents only 0.7% of world's tropical forested area but are highly threatened due to susceptibility to climate change, sea level rise, and increasing pressures from human population growth in coastal regions. Our study was carried out in the Bhitarkanika Conservation Area (BCA), the second-largest mangrove area in eastern India. We assessed total ecosystem carbon (C) stocks at four land use types representing varying degree of disturbances. Ranked in order of increasing impacts, these sites included dense mangrove forests, scrub mangroves, restored/planted mangroves, and abandoned aquaculture ponds...
July 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Aslaug Drotningsvik, Svein A Mjøs, Daniela M Pampanin, Rasa Slizyte, Ana Carvajal, Tore Remman, Ingmar Høgøy, Oddrun A Gudbrandsen
The world's fisheries and aquaculture industries produce vast amounts of protein-containing by-products that can be enzymatically hydrolysed to smaller peptides and possibly be used as additives to functional foods and nutraceuticals targeted for patients with obesity-related metabolic disorders. To investigate the effects of fish protein hydrolysates on markers of metabolic disorders, obese Zucker fa/fa rats consumed diets with 75 % of protein from casein/whey (CAS) and 25 % from herring (HER) or salmon (SAL) protein hydrolysate from rest raw material, or 100 % protein from CAS for 4 weeks...
October 2016: British Journal of Nutrition
Steffi Rocchi, Maxime Tisserant, Benoit Valot, Audrey Laboissière, Victor Frossard, Gabriel Reboux
Since 2010, the Loue River (Franche-Comté, East of France) has been suffering from massive fish kills infested by Saprolegnia parasitica. The river supplies inhabitants of the city of Besançon in drinking water, raising the question of a potential risk through both water consumption and use. We developed a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) to quantify S. parasitica in the Loue River as well as in the drinking water. A weak spatial trend is suggested with greater quantities of S. parasitica observed at the sampling station close to the main pumping station...
October 18, 2016: International Journal of Environmental Health Research
Ting Zhang, Xuan Ban, Xuelei Wang, Xiaobin Cai, Enhua Li, Zhi Wang, Chao Yang, Qing Zhang, Xiaorong Lu
A two-dimensional (2D) water quality model was established to determine the response of water quality variables and submerged aquatic vegetation biomass to load reduction from watershed inflows and enclosure aquaculture in Honghu Lake in China. Results showed that the total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) loads from upstream discharge were the major external loads in the lake, accounting for 70% and 63% of the total loads, respectively. Scenario simulation results indicated that 93.2% of the lake area in summer (August) and 89...
October 14, 2016: Science of the Total Environment
Khawaja Muhammad Imran Bashir, Man-Gi Cho
Antibiotics are routinely used in microalgae culture screening, stock culture maintenance, and genetic transformation. By studying the effect of antibiotics on microalgae growth, we can estimate the least value to inhibit growth of undesired pathogens in algal culture. We studied the effect of kanamycin and tetracycline on the growth and photosynthetic activity of two chlorophyte microalgae, Dictyosphaerium pulchellum and Micractinium pusillum. We measured CFU mL(-1) on agar plates, optical density, fluorescence yields, and photosynthetic inhibition...
2016: BioMed Research International
M M Kathleen, L Samuel, C Felecia, E L Reagan, A Kasing, M Lesley, S C Toh
The administration of antimicrobials in aquaculture provides a selective pressure creating a reservoir of multiple resistant bacteria in the cultured fish and shrimps as well as the aquaculture environment. The objective of this study was to determine the extent of antibiotic resistance in aquaculture products and aquaculture's surrounding environment in Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Ninety-four identified bacterial isolates constituted of 17 genera were isolated from sediment, water, and cultured organisms (fish and shrimp) in selected aquaculture farms...
2016: International Journal of Microbiology
Dung V Le, Andrea C Alfaro, Norman L C Ragg, Zoë Hilton, Nick King
Geoduck clams (Panopea spp.) are the longest-lived and largest deep burrowing bivalve. Their unique morphology allows them to live buried in the sediment at depths of up to 1 m. The endemic New Zealand geoduck (Panopea zelandica Quoy and Gaimard, 1835) has recently been identified as a potential species for aquaculture. However, very little is known about the biology and physiology of this entirely subtidal geoduck species. Currently, the New Zealand geoduck fishery relies entirely upon wild harvests, but farms are expected to emerge as cultivation protocols are established...
October 15, 2016: Journal of Comparative Physiology. B, Biochemical, Systemic, and Environmental Physiology
Ana Claudia Sánchez-Ortiz, Carlos Angulo, Antonio Luna-González, Píndaro Álvarez-Ruiz, José Manuel Mazón-Suástegui, Ángel Isidro Campa-Córdova
The widespread overuse of antibiotics in aquaculture has led to the emergence of antibiotic-resistance shrimp pathogens, the negative impact on shrimp gut microbiota, and the presence of antimicrobial residues in aquaculture products, with negative consequences on human health. Alternatively, probiotics have positive effects on immunological responses and productive performance of aquatic animals. In this study, three probiotic bacteria, (Bacillus licheniformis MAt32, B. subtilis MAt43 and B. subtilis subsp...
October 12, 2016: Fish & Shellfish Immunology
Ana Cecilia Gomes Silva, Daniela Volcan Almeida, Bruna Felix Nornberg, Jessica Ribeiro Pereira, Diego Martins Pires, Carine Dahl Corcini, Antonio Sergio Varela Junior, Luis Fernando Marins
Growth hormone (GH) transgenesis presents a high potential application in aquaculture. However, excess GH may have serious consequences due to pleiotropic actions. In order to study these effects in zebrafish (Danio rerio), two transgenic lines were developed. The first expresses GH ubiquitously and constitutively (F0104 line), while the second expresses the GH receptor in a muscle-specific manner (Myo-GHR line). Results from the F0104 line showed accelerated growth but increased reproductive difficulties, while Myo-GHR did not show the expected increase in muscle mass...
October 14, 2016: Transgenic Research
Bruno Louro, João Pedro Marques, Deborah M Power, Adelino V M Canário
The gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) and the European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) are the most important aquaculture species in the Mediterranean Sea and since the last decade it has been seen an exponential increase in their available molecular resources. In order to improve accessibility to transcriptome resources, Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs), mRNA sequences and raw read sequences were assembled and deposited in BLAST queryable databases. The publicly available sea bream and sea bass sequences (6...
October 11, 2016: Marine Genomics
So-Young Oh, Toyohiko Nishizawa
Red seabream iridovirus (RSIV), a member within genus Megalocytivirus (Iridoviridae), causes serious economic losses to marine fish aquaculture industry in East Asia. In this study, we established a Blue Striped Grunt Haemulon sciurus fin (grunt fin; GF) cell line persistently infected with RSIV (PI-GF(RSIV)) by subculturing GF cells that survived RSIV inoculation. PI-GF(RSIV) cells were morphologically indistinguishable from naive GF cells. They could stably produce RSIV at approximately 10(4.9 ± 0.5) genomes per microliter after 24 passages over 18 months...
December 2016: Journal of Aquatic Animal Health
Julie Mellery, Florian Geay, Douglas R Tocher, Patrick Kestemont, Cathy Debier, Xavier Rollin, Yvan Larondelle
Aquaculture is meant to provide fish rich in omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA). This objective must be reached despite (1) the necessity to replace the finite and limited fish oil in feed production and (2) the increased temperature of the supply water induced by the global warming. The objective of the present paper was to determine to what extent increased water temperature influences the fatty acid bioconversion capacity of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a plant-derived diet...
2016: PloS One
Ben Belton, Simon R Bush, David C Little
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 12, 2016: Nature
Christopher Golden
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 12, 2016: Nature
Xiaozhu Wang, Shikai Liu, Chen Jiang, Xin Geng, Tao Zhou, Ning Li, Lisui Bao, Yun Li, Jun Yao, Yujia Yang, Xiaoxiao Zhong, Yulin Jin, Rex Dunham, Zhanjiang Liu
The ability to survive hypoxic conditions is important for various organisms, especially for aquatic animals. Teleost fish, representing more than 50 % of vertebrate species, are extremely efficient in utilizing low levels of dissolved oxygen in water. However, huge variations exist among various taxa of fish in their ability to tolerate hypoxia. In aquaculture, hypoxia tolerance is among the most important traits because hypoxia can cause major economic losses. Genetic enhancement for hypoxia tolerance in catfish is of great interest, but little was done with analysis of the genetic architecture of hypoxia tolerance...
October 12, 2016: Molecular Genetics and Genomics: MGG
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