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bee pollen

Nadja Danner, Anna Maria Molitor, Susanne Schiele, Stephan Härtel, Ingolf Steffan-Dewenter
Honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) show a large variation in foraging distances and use a broad range of plant species as pollen resources, even in regions with intensive agriculture. However, it is unknown how increasing areas of mass-flowering crops like oilseed rape (Brassica napus; OSR) or a decrease of seminatural habitats (SNH) change the temporal and spatial availability of pollen resources for honey bee colonies, and thus foraging distances and frequency in different habitat types. We studied pollen foraging of honey bee colonies in 16 agricultural landscapes with independent gradients of OSR and SNH area within 2 km and used waggle dances and digital geographic maps with major land cover types to reveal the distance and visited habitat type on a landscape level...
September 2016: Ecological Applications: a Publication of the Ecological Society of America
Zachary Scott, Howard S Ginsberg, Steven R Alm
We identified 41 species of native bees from a total of 1,083 specimens collected at cultivated highbush blueberry plantings throughout Rhode Island in 2014 and 2015. Andrena spp., Bombus spp., and Xylocopa virginica (L.) were collected most often. Bombus griseocollis (DeGeer), B. impatiens Cresson, B. bimaculatus Cresson, B. perplexus Cresson, and Andrena vicina Smith collected the largest mean numbers of blueberry pollen tetrads. The largest mean percent blueberry pollen loads were carried by the miner bees Andrena bradleyi Viereck (91%), A...
October 15, 2016: Environmental Entomology
A D Vaudo, D Stabler, H M Patch, J F Tooker, C M Grozinger, G A Wright
Bee population declines are linked to reduction of nutritional resources due to land-use intensification, yet we know little about the specific nutritional needs of many bee species. Pollen provides bees their primary source of protein and lipids, but nutritional quality varies widely among host-plant species. Therefore, bees may be adapted to assess resource quality and adjust their foraging behavior to balance nutrition from multiple food sources. We tested the ability of two bumble bee species, Bombus terrestris and B...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Experimental Biology
Maryse Vanderplanck, Sylvain Decleves, Nathalie Roger, Corentin Decroo, Guillaume Caulier, Gaetan Glauser, Pascal Gerbaux, Georges Lognay, Aurore Richel, Nathalie Escaravage, Denis Michez
Current evidence suggests that pollen is both chemically and structurally protected. Despite increasing interest in studying bee-flower networks, the constraints for bee development related to pollen nutritional content, toxicity and digestibility as well as their role in the shaping of bee-flower interactions have been poorly studied. In this study we combined bioassays of the generalist bee Bombus terrestris on pollen of Cirsium, Trifolium, Salix and Cistus genera with an assessment of nutritional content, toxicity and digestibility of pollen...
October 12, 2016: Insect Science
Daniele Alberoni, Francesca Gaggìa, Loredana Baffoni, Diana Di Gioia
Nowadays, honey bees are stressed by a number of biotic and abiotic factors which may compromise to some extent the pollination service and the hive productivity. The EU ban of antibiotics as therapeutic agents against bee pathogens has stimulated the search for natural alternatives. The increasing knowledge on the composition and functions of the bee gut microbiota and the link between a balanced gut microbiota and health status have encouraged the research on the use of gut microorganisms to improve bee health...
October 8, 2016: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
Patrick W Maes, Pedro A P Rodrigues, Randy Oliver, Brendon M Mott, Kirk E Anderson
Dysbiosis, defined as unhealthy shifts in bacterial community composition, can lower the colonization resistance of the gut to intrinsic pathogens. Here, we determined the effect of diet age and type on the health and bacterial community composition of the honeybee (Apis mellifera). We fed newly emerged bees fresh or aged diets, and then recorded host development and bacterial community composition from four distinct regions of the hosts' digestive tract. Feeding fresh pollen or fresh substitute, we found no difference in host mortality, diet consumption, development or microbial community composition...
September 26, 2016: Molecular Ecology
Yuanyuan Wang, Pingli Dai, Xiuping Chen, Jörg Romeis, Jianrong Shi, Yufa Peng, Yunhe Li
Because of its ecological and economic importance, the honey bee Apis mellifera is commonly used to assess the environmental risk of insect-resistant, genetically modified plants. In the current laboratory study, feeding-exposure experiments were used to determine whether pollen from transgenic rice harms A. mellifera worker bee. In one experiment, the survival and mean acinus diameter of hypopharyngeal glands of adult bees were similar when bees were fed on pollen from Bt rice lines or from a non-Bt rice line, but bee survival was significantly reduced when they received pollen that was mixed with potassium arsenate as a positive control...
October 7, 2016: Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry
Richard Schmuck, Gavin Lewis
The nitro-substituted neonicotinoid insecticides, which include imidacloprid, thiamethoxam and clothianidin, are widely used to control a range of important agricultural pests both by foliar applications and also as seed dressings and by soil application. Since they exhibit systemic properties, exposure of bees may occur as a result of residues present in the nectar and/or pollen of seed- or soil-treated crop plants and so they have been the subject of much debate about whether they cause adverse effects in pollinating insects under field conditions...
October 5, 2016: Ecotoxicology
Joaquín Sastre, Marina Sastre-Ibañez
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To describe recent insights into how molecular diagnosis can improve indication and selection of suitable allergens for specific immunotherapy and increase the safety of this therapy. RECENT FINDINGS: As specific allergen immunotherapy targets specific allergens, identification of the disease-eliciting allergen is a prerequisite for accurate prescription of treatment. In areas of complex sensitization to aeroallergens or in cases of hymenoptera venom allergy, the use of molecular diagnosis has demonstrated that it may lead to a change in indication and selection of allergens for immunotherapy in a large proportion of patients when compared with diagnosis based on skin prick testing and/or specific IgE determination with commercial extracts...
September 28, 2016: Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology
Takayuki Ueno, Kiyoshi Kawasaki, Takeo Kubo
Honeybee workers are engaged in various tasks related to maintaining colony activity. The tasks of the workers change according to their age (age-related division of labor). Young workers are engaged in nursing the brood (nurse bees), while older workers are engaged in foraging for nectar and pollen (foragers). The physiology of the workers changes in association with this role shift. For example, the main function of the hypopharyngeal glands (HPGs) changes from the secretion of major royal jelly proteins (MRJPs) to the secretion of carbohydrate-metabolizing enzymes...
2016: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
C M Silva-Neto, L L Bergamini, M A S Elias, G L Moreira, J M Morais, B A R Bergamini, E V Franceschinelli
Pollinators provide an essential service to natural ecosystems and agriculture. In tomatoes flowers, anthers are poricidal, pollen may drop from their pore when flowers are shaken by the wind. However, bees that vibrate these anthers increase pollen load on the stigma and in fruit production. The present study aimed to identify the pollinator richness of tomato flowers and investigate their morphological and functional traits related to the plant-pollinator interaction in plantations of Central Brazil. The time of anthesis, flower duration, and the number and viability of pollen grains and ovules were recorded...
September 26, 2016: Brazilian Journal of Biology, Revista Brasleira de Biologia
Guido Sterk, Britta Peters, Zhenglei Gao, Ulrich Zumkier
The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Elado(®)-dressed winter oilseed rape (OSR, 10 g clothianidin & 2 g beta-cyfluthrin/kg seed) on the development, reproduction and behaviour of large earth bumble bees (Bombus terrestris) as part of a large-scale monitoring field study in Northern Germany, where OSR is usually cultivated at 25-33 % of the arable land. Both reference and test sites comprised 65 km(2) in which no other crops attractive to pollinating insects were present. Six study locations were selected per site and 10 bumble bee hives were placed at each location...
September 27, 2016: Ecotoxicology
Ping-Li Dai, Hui-Ru Jia, Cameron J Jack, Li-Li Geng, Feng Liu, Chun-Sheng Hou, Qing-Yun Diao, James D Ellis
The cry1Ie gene may be a good candidate for the development of Bt maize because over-expression of Cry1Ie is highly toxic to Lepidopteran pests such as Heliothis armigera Hübner and Ostrinia furnacalis Guenée. The Bt cry1Ie gene also has no cross resistance with other insecticidal proteins such as Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1Ah, or Cry1F. Chinese honey bees (Apis cerana cerana) are potentially exposed to insect-resistant genetically modified (IRGM) crops expressing Cry1Ie toxin via the collection of IRGM crop pollen...
September 26, 2016: Journal of Economic Entomology
James H Cane
Reproduction is a nutritionally costly activity for many insects, as their eggs are rich in lipids and proteins. That cost seems especially acute for non-social bees, which for their size, lay enormous eggs. All adult female bees visit flowers, most of them to collect pollen and nectar, or sometimes oils, to feed their progeny. For adult bees, the need for pollen feeding has only been detailed for the honey bee, Apis mellifera. To experimentally test for the reproductive value of adult pollen feeding by a non-social bee, Osmia californica (Hymenoptera: Apiformes: Megachilidae), young female bees plus males were released into large glasshouse cages provided with either a male-fertile sunflower cultivar or a pollen-less one...
September 19, 2016: Journal of Insect Physiology
S B Lerman, J Milam
Private yards comprise a significant component of urban lands, with managed lawns representing the dominant land cover. Lawns blanket > 163,000 km(2) of the United States, and 50% of urban and suburban areas. When not treated with herbicides, lawns have the capacity to support a diversity of spontaneous (e.g., not planted) flowers, with the potential to provide nectar and pollen resources for pollinators such as native bees. In order to determine the extent to which suburban lawns support these important species, we surveyed lawns in 17 suburban yards in Springfield, MA, between May and September 2013 and 2014...
September 2016: Annals of the Entomological Society of America
Daniel Rolke, Markus Persigehl, Britta Peters, Guido Sterk, Wolfgang Blenau
This study was part of a large-scale monitoring project to assess the possible effects of Elado(®) (10 g clothianidin & 2 g β-cyfluthrin/kg seed)-dressed oilseed rape seeds on different pollinators in Northern Germany. Firstly, residues of clothianidin and its active metabolites thiazolylnitroguanidine and thiazolylmethylurea were measured in nectar and pollen from Elado(®)-dressed (test site, T) and undressed (reference site, R) oilseed rape collected by honey bees confined within tunnel tents. Clothianidin and its metabolites could not be detected or quantified in samples from R fields...
September 20, 2016: Ecotoxicology
Daniel Rolke, Stefan Fuchs, Bernd Grünewald, Zhenglei Gao, Wolfgang Blenau
Possible effects of clothianidin seed-treated oilseed rape on honey bee colonies were investigated in a large-scale monitoring project in Northern Germany, where oilseed rape usually comprises 25-33 % of the arable land. For both reference and test sites, six study locations were selected and eight honey bee hives were placed at each location. At each site, three locations were directly adjacent to oilseed rape fields and three locations were situated 400 m away from the nearest oilseed rape field. Thus, 96 hives were exposed to fully flowering oilseed rape crops...
September 19, 2016: Ecotoxicology
Garance Di Pasquale, Cédric Alaux, Yves Le Conte, Jean-François Odoux, Maryline Pioz, Bernard E Vaissière, Luc P Belzunces, Axel Decourtye
Intensive agricultural systems often expose honey bees (Apis mellifera L.) to large temporal variations in the availability (quantity, quality and diversity) of nutritional resources. Such nutritional irregularity is expected to affect honey bee health. We therefore tested under laboratory conditions the effect of such variation in pollen availability on honey bee health (survival and nursing physiology-hypopharyngeal gland development and vitellogenin expression). We fed honey bees with different diets composed of pollen pellets collected by honey bees in an agricultural landscape of western France...
2016: PloS One
Ulrika Samnegård, Peter A Hambäck, Debissa Lemessa, Sileshi Nemomissa, Kristoffer Hylander
The expansion of pollinator-dependent crops, especially in the developing world, together with reports of worldwide pollinator declines, raises concern of possible yield gaps. Farmers directly reliant on pollination services for food supply often live in regions where our knowledge of pollination services is poor. In a manipulative experiment replicated at 23 sites across an Ethiopian agricultural landscape, we found poor pollination services and severe pollen limitation in a common oil crop. With supplementary pollination, the yield increased on average by 91%...
September 14, 2016: Proceedings. Biological Sciences
Kirsten S Traynor, Jeffery S Pettis, David R Tarpy, Christopher A Mullin, James L Frazier, Maryann Frazier, Dennis vanEngelsdorp
This study measured part of the in-hive pesticide exposome by analyzing residues from live in-hive bees, stored pollen, and wax in migratory colonies over time and compared exposure to colony health. We summarized the pesticide burden using three different additive methods: (1) the hazard quotient (HQ), an estimate of pesticide exposure risk, (2) the total number of pesticide residues, and (3) the number of relevant residues. Despite being simplistic, these models attempt to summarize potential risk from multiple contaminations in real-world contexts...
2016: Scientific Reports
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