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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28416414/deep-temporal-models-and-active-inference
#1
REVIEW
Karl J Friston, Richard Rosch, Thomas Parr, Cathy Price, Howard Bowman
How do we navigate a deeply structured world? Why are you reading this sentence first - and did you actually look at the fifth word? This review offers some answers by appealing to active inference based on deep temporal models. It builds on previous formulations of active inference to simulate behavioural and electrophysiological responses under hierarchical generative models of state transitions. Inverting these models corresponds to sequential inference, such that the state at any hierarchical level entails a sequence of transitions in the level below...
April 14, 2017: Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28414970/understanding-deceptive-intentions-behind-pointing-gestures-in-12-15-month-old-infants
#2
Diána Á Varró-Horváth, Krisztina Dorn, Beatrix Lábadi
We examined the comprehension of deceptive intentions revealed in searching task in infancy, on the theoretical basis of natural pedagogy and epistemic trust. The main findings showed that 12-15-month-old infants are able to discriminate the reliable and the deceptive actions of adults, but they do not generalize their previous experience in connection with a novel person, who is treated as a new reliable source of information.
April 14, 2017: Infant Behavior & Development
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28413687/what-we-have-changed-our-minds-about-part-1-borderline-personality-disorder-as-a-limitation-of-resilience
#3
REVIEW
Peter Fonagy, Patrick Luyten, Elizabeth Allison, Chloe Campbell
This paper sets out a recent transition in our thinking in relation to psychopathology associated with personality disorder, in an approach that integrates our thinking about attachment, mentalizing (understanding ourselves and others in terms of intentional mental states) and epistemic trust (openness to the reception of social communication that is personally relevant and of generalizable significance) with recent findings on the structure of both adult and child psychopathology and resilience. In this paper - the first of two parts - we review evidence suggesting that a general psychopathology or p factor underlies vulnerability for psychopathology...
2017: Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28405338/what-we-have-changed-our-minds-about-part-2-borderline-personality-disorder-epistemic-trust-and-the-developmental-significance-of-social-communication
#4
REVIEW
Peter Fonagy, Patrick Luyten, Elizabeth Allison, Chloe Campbell
In Part 1 of this paper, we discussed emerging evidence suggesting that a general psychopathology or 'p' factor underlying the various forms of psychopathology should be conceptualized in terms of the absence of resilience, that is, the absence of positive reappraisal mechanisms when faced with adversity. These impairments in the capacity for positive reappraisal seem to provide a comprehensive explanation for the association between the p factor and comorbidity, future caseness, and the 'hard-to-reach' character of many patients with severe personality pathology, most notably borderline personality disorder (BPD)...
2017: Borderline Personality Disorder and Emotion Dysregulation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401817/contesting-facts-about-wind-farms-in-australia-and-the-legitimacy-of-adverse-health-effects
#5
Shannon Clark, Linda Courtenay Botterill
The development of wind energy in Australia has been subject to ongoing public debate and has been characterised by concerns over the health impacts of wind turbines. Using discursive psychology, we examine 'wind turbine syndrome' as a contested illness and analyse how people build and undermine divergent arguments about wind-farm health effects. This article explores two facets of the dispute. First, we consider how participants construct 'facts' about the health effects of wind farms. We examine rhetorical resources used to construct wind farms as harmful or benign...
February 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28401814/public-discourse-on-mental-health-and-psychiatry-representations-in-swedish-newspapers
#6
Robert Ohlsson
Mass media plays a central role in shaping public discourse on health and illness. In order to examine media representations of mental health and expert knowledge in this field, two major Swedish daily newspapers from the year 2009 were qualitatively analysed. Drawing on the theory of social representations, the analysis focused on how issues concerning mental health and different perspectives are represented. The results show how the concept of mental illness is used in different and often taken-for-granted ways and how the distinction between normal and pathological is a central underlying question...
January 1, 2017: Health (London)
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28400962/epistemic-injustice-in-psychiatry
#7
EDITORIAL
Paul Crichton, Havi Carel, Ian James Kidd
It has been argued that those who suffer from medical conditions are more vulnerable to epistemic injustice (a harm done to a person in their capacity as an epistemic subject) than healthy people. This editorial claims that people with mental disorders are even more vulnerable to epistemic injustice than those with somatic illnesses. Two kinds of contributory factors are outlined, global and specific. Some suggestions are made to counteract the effects of these factors, for instance, we suggest that physicians should participate in groups where the subjective experience of patients is explored, and learn to become more aware of their own unconscious prejudices towards psychiatric patients...
April 2017: BJPsych Bulletin
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28389261/an-engineering-paradigm-in-the-biomedical-sciences-knowledge-as-epistemic-tool
#8
REVIEW
Mieke Boon
In order to deal with the complexity of biological systems and attempts to generate applicable results, current biomedical sciences are adopting concepts and methods from the engineering sciences. Philosophers of science have interpreted this as the emergence of an engineering paradigm, in particular in systems biology and synthetic biology. This article aims at the articulation of the supposed engineering paradigm by contrast with the physics paradigm that supported the rise of biochemistry and molecular biology...
April 4, 2017: Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28384624/the-wild-type-as-concept-and-in-experimental-practice-a-history-of-its-role-in-classical-genetics-and-evolutionary-theory
#9
Tarquin Holmes
Wild types in genetics are specialised strains of laboratory experimental organism which principally serve as standards against which variation is measured. As selectively inbred lineages highly isolated from ancestral wild populations, there appears to be little wild or typical about them. I will nonetheless argue that they have historically been successfully used as stand-ins for nature, allowing knowledge produced in the laboratory to be extrapolated to the natural world. In this paper, I will explore the 19th century origins of the wild type concept, the theoretical and experimental innovations which allowed concepts and organisms to move from wild nature to laboratory domestication c...
April 3, 2017: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28376776/the-ecouter-methodology-for-stakeholder-engagement-in-translational-research
#10
Madeleine J Murtagh, Joel T Minion, Andrew Turner, Rebecca C Wilson, Mwenza Blell, Cynthia Ochieng, Barnaby Murtagh, Stephanie Roberts, Oliver W Butters, Paul R Burton
BACKGROUND: Because no single person or group holds knowledge about all aspects of research, mechanisms are needed to support knowledge exchange and engagement. Expertise in the research setting necessarily includes scientific and methodological expertise, but also expertise gained through the experience of participating in research and/or being a recipient of research outcomes (as a patient or member of the public). Engagement is, by its nature, reciprocal and relational: the process of engaging research participants, patients, citizens and others (the many 'publics' of engagement) brings them closer to the research but also brings the research closer to them...
April 4, 2017: BMC Medical Ethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28374464/wrongness-responsibility-and-conscientious-refusals-in-health-care
#11
Alida Liberman
In this article, I address what kinds of claims are of the right kind to ground conscientious refusals. Specifically, I investigate what conceptions of moral responsibility and moral wrongness can be permissibly presumed by conscientious objectors. I argue that we must permit HCPs to come to their own subjective conclusions about what they take to be morally wrong and what they take themselves to be morally responsible for. However, these subjective assessments of wrongness and responsibility must be constrained in several important ways: they cannot involve empirical falsehoods, objectionably discriminatory attitudes, or unreasonable normative beliefs...
April 3, 2017: Bioethics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28368197/shared-reality-in-intergroup-communication-increasing-the-epistemic-authority-of-an-out-group-audience
#12
Gerald Echterhoff, René Kopietz, E Tory Higgins
Communicators typically tune messages to their audience's attitude. Such audience tuning biases communicators' memory for the topic toward the audience's attitude to the extent that they create a shared reality with the audience. To investigate shared reality in intergroup communication, we first established that a reduced memory bias after tuning messages to an out-group (vs. in-group) audience is a subtle index of communicators' denial of shared reality to that out-group audience (Experiments 1a and 1b). We then examined whether the audience-tuning memory bias might emerge when the out-group audience's epistemic authority is enhanced, either by increasing epistemic expertise concerning the communication topic or by creating epistemic consensus among members of a multiperson out-group audience...
April 3, 2017: Journal of Experimental Psychology. General
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28367475/measuring-vapor-intrusion-from-source-science-politics-to-a-transdisciplinary-approach
#13
Peter C Little, Kelly G Pennell
Investigation of indoor air quality has been on the upswing in recent years. In this article, we focus on how the transport of subsurface vapors into indoor air spaces, a process known as "vapor intrusion," (VI) is defined and addressed. For environmental engineers and physical scientists who specialize in this emerging indoor environmental exposure science, VI is notoriously difficult to characterize, leading the regulatory community to seek improved science-based understandings of VI pathways and exposures...
2017: Environ Sociol
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28358533/what-i-don-t-know-won-t-hurt-you-the-relation-between-professed-ignorance-and-later-knowledge-claims
#14
Tamar Kushnir, Melissa A Koenig
Testimony is a valuable source of information for young learners, in particular if children maintain vigilance against errors while still being open to learning from imperfectly knowledgeable sources. We find support for this idea by examining how children evaluate individual speakers who present very different epistemic risks by being previously ignorant or inaccurate. Results across 2 experiments show that children attribute knowledge to (Experiment 1) and endorse new claims made by speakers (Experiment 2) who previously professed ignorance about familiar object labels, but not to speakers whose labels were previously inaccurate...
March 30, 2017: Developmental Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28336791/faultless-responsibility-on-the-nature-and-allocation-of-moral-responsibility-for-distributed-moral-actions
#15
Luciano Floridi
The concept of distributed moral responsibility (DMR) has a long history. When it is understood as being entirely reducible to the sum of (some) human, individual and already morally loaded actions, then the allocation of DMR, and hence of praise and reward or blame and punishment, may be pragmatically difficult, but not conceptually problematic. However, in distributed environments, it is increasingly possible that a network of agents, some human, some artificial (e.g. a program) and some hybrid (e.g. a group of people working as a team thanks to a software platform), may cause distributed moral actions (DMAs)...
December 28, 2016: Philosophical Transactions. Series A, Mathematical, Physical, and Engineering Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28303075/epistemic-injustice-and-illness
#16
Ian James Kidd, Havi Carel
This article analyses the phenomenon of epistemic injustice within contemporary healthcare. We begin by detailing the persistent complaints patients make about their testimonial frustration and hermeneutical marginalization, and the negative impact this has on their care. We offer an epistemic analysis of this problem using Miranda Fricker's account of epistemic injustice. We detail two types of epistemic injustice, testimonial and hermeneutical, and identify the negative stereotypes and structural features of modern healthcare practices that generate them...
February 2017: Journal of Applied Philosophy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28299586/race-research-and-the-ethics-of-belief
#17
Jonathan Anomaly
On most accounts, beliefs are supposed to fit the world rather than change it. But believing can have social consequences, since the beliefs we form underwrite our actions and impact our character. Because our beliefs affect how we live our lives and how we treat other people, it is surprising how little attention is usually given to the moral status of believing apart from its epistemic justification. In what follows, I develop a version of the harm principle that applies to beliefs as well as actions. In doing so, I challenge the often exaggerated distinction between forming beliefs and acting on them...
March 15, 2017: Journal of Bioethical Inquiry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28287844/intersectional-epistemologies-of-ignorance-how-behavioral-and-social-science-research-shapes-what-we-know-think-we-know-and-don-t-know-about-u-s-black-men-s-sexualities
#18
Lisa Bowleg, Ana María Del Río-González, Sidney L Holt, Carolin Pérez, Jenné S Massie, Jessica E Mandell, Cheriko A Boone
Epistemologies of ignorance describe how ignorance influences the production of knowledge. Advancing an intersectional epistemologies of ignorance approach that examines how conscious (or unconscious) ignorance about racism, heterosexism, and classism shapes empirical knowledge about Black men's sexualities, we conducted a critical review of the behavioral and social science research on U.S. Black men, ages 18 and older, for two time frames: pre-1981 and the most recent decade, 2006-2016. Our search yielded 668 articles, which we classified into five categories: sexual violence, sexual experiences and expressions, sexual identities, cultural and social-structural influences, and sexual health and sexual risk...
March 13, 2017: Journal of Sex Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28283411/where-do-uncertainties-reside-within-environmental-risk-assessments-testing-unisera-a-guide-for-uncertainty-assessment
#19
Daniel J C Skinner, Sophie A Rocks, Simon J T Pollard
A means for identifying and prioritising the treatment of uncertainty (UnISERA) in environmental risk assessments (ERAs) is tested, using three risk domains where ERA is an established requirement and one in which ERA practice is emerging. UnISERA's development draws on 19 expert elicitations across genetically modified higher plants, particulate matter, and agricultural pesticide release and is stress tested here for engineered nanomaterials (ENM). We are concerned with the severity of uncertainty; its nature; and its location across four accepted stages of ERAs...
March 7, 2017: Environmental Pollution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28283052/silent-performances-are-repertoires-really-post-kuhnian
#20
Matthew Sample
Ankeny and Leonelli (2016) propose "repertoires" as a new way to understand the stability of certain research programs as well as scientific change in general. By bringing a more complete range of social, material, and epistemic elements into one framework, they position their work as a correction to the Kuhnian impulse in philosophy of science and other areas of science studies. I argue that this "post-Kuhnian" move is not complete, and that repertoires maintain an internalist perspective. Comparison with an alternative framework, the "sociotechnical imaginaries" of Jasanoff and Kim (2015), illustrates precisely which elements of practice are externalized by Ankeny and Leonelli...
February 2017: Studies in History and Philosophy of Science
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