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Jolanda van Dijke, Inge van Nistelrooij, Pien Bos, Joachim Duyndam
BACKGROUND: Empathy is a contested concept in the field of care ethics. According to its proponents, empathy is a unique way to connect with others, to understand what is at stake for them, and to help guide moral deliberation. According to its critics, empathy is biased, inaccurate or a form of projection that does not truly grasp and respect the otherness of the other, and that may be distorted by prejudices. OBJECTIVES: We aim to contribute to a better understanding of the significance of empathy in care ethics by reviewing both the functions and limitations of empathy in this field...
January 1, 2018: Nursing Ethics
Sahanika Ratnayake, David Merry
Mindfulness exercises are presented as being compatible with almost any spiritual, religious or philosophical beliefs. In this paper, we argue that they in fact involve imagining and conceptualising rather striking and controversial claims about the self, and the self's relationship to thoughts and feelings. For this reason, practising mindfulness exercises is likely to be in tension with many people's core beliefs and values, a tension that should be treated as a downside of therapeutic interventions involving mindfulness exercises, not unlike a side effect...
March 9, 2018: Journal of Medical Ethics
Dominique A Tobbell
BACKGROUND: Beginning in the late 1950s and intensifying through the 1960s and 1970s, nurse educators, researchers, and scholars worked to establish nursing as an academic discipline. These nursing leaders argued that the development of nursing theory was not only critical to nursing's academic project but also to improving nursing practice and patient care. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of the article is to examine the context for the development of nursing theory and the characteristics of early theory development from the 1950s through the early 1980s...
March 2018: Nursing Research
Carol Bullin
Background: A doctoral degree, either a PhD or equivalent, is the academic credential required for an academic nurse educator position in a university setting; however, the lack of formal teaching courses in doctoral programs contradict the belief that these graduates are proficient in teaching. As a result, many PhD prepared individuals are not ready to meet the demands of teaching. Methods: An integrative literature review was undertaken. Four electronic databases were searched including the Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), PubMed, Educational Resources Information Center (ERIC) and ProQuest...
2018: BMC Nursing
Samuel Merk, Tom Rosman, Julia Rueß, Marcus Syring, Jürgen Schneider
[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0184971.].
2018: PloS One
Stefania Paolini, Kylie McIntyre
Theories of risk aversion, epistemic defense, and ingroup enhancement converge in predicting greater impact of negative (vs. positive) experiences with outgroup members on generalized evaluations of stigmatized outgroups. However, they diverge in predictions for admired outgroups. Past tests have focused on negative outgroups using correlational designs without a control group. Consequently, they have not distinguished between alternative explanations or ascertained the direction of causality/generalization, and they have suffered from self-selection biases...
February 1, 2018: Personality and Social Psychology Review
Angela Clarke, Pamela J Meredith, Tanya A Rose, Michael Daubney
This paper provides an introduction to epistemic trust for speech-language pathologists (SLPs). 'Epistemic trust' describes a specific form of trust that an individual places in others when learning about the world, particularly the social world. To date, the relevance of epistemic trust to SLP clinical practice has received little theoretical or empirical attention. The aim of this paper is to define epistemic trust and explain its relationship with parent-child attachment and mentalization which have, in turn, been linked with language development and use...
February 14, 2018: Journal of Communication Disorders
Anubav Vasudevan
This paper situates the metaphysical antinomy between chance and determinism in the historical context of some of the earliest developments in the mathematical theory of probability. Since Hacking's seminal work on the subject, it has been a widely held view that the classical theorists of probability were guilty of an unwitting equivocation between a subjective, or epistemic, interpretation of probability, on the one hand, and an objective, or statistical, interpretation, on the other. While there is some truth to this account, I argue that the tension at the heart of the classical theory of probability is not best understood in terms of the duality between subjective and objective interpretations of probability...
February 2018: Studies in History and Philosophy of Science
Carolyn P Neuhaus
New techniques for the genetic modification of organisms are creating new strategies for addressing persistent public health challenges. For example, the company Oxitec has conducted field trials internationally-and has attempted to conduct field trials in the United States-of a genetically modified mosquito that can be used to control dengue, Zika, and some other mosquito-borne diseases. In 2016, a report commissioned by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine discussed the potential benefits and risks of another strategy, using gene drives...
January 2018: Hastings Center Report
Lucio Capurso
Evidence-based medicine (EBM) and personalized medicine (PM) are driven by two diverse modes of reasoning about «evidence making». EBM has been criticized since his quality mark has been misappropriated by vested interests, the benefits statistically significant may be marginal in clinical practice, rigid rules and technology may produce care that is management driven rather than patient centered. On the contrary PM (or "precision medicine") refers to the tailoring of medical treatment to the specific characteristics of each patient involving the ability to classify individuals into subpopulations that are uniquely susceptible to a specific treatment, sparing expense and side effects and is derived from doubts on the results of subgroup analyses and on non responders in clinical trials typical of EBM...
January 2018: Recenti Progressi in Medicina
Thomas Franssen, Wout Scholten, Laurens K Hessels, Sarah de Rijcke
Over the past decades, science funding shows a shift from recurrent block funding towards project funding mechanisms. However, our knowledge of how project funding arrangements influence the organizational and epistemic properties of research is limited. To study this relation, a bridge between science policy studies and science studies is necessary. Recent studies have analyzed the relation between the affordances and constraints of project grants and the epistemic properties of research. However, the potentially very different affordances and constraints of funding arrangements such as awards, prizes and fellowships, have not yet been taken into account...
2018: Minerva
Katie Attwell, David T Smith, Paul R Ward
To address the phenomenon of vaccine hesitancy and rejection, researchers increasingly recognise the need to engage with the social context of parents' decision-making. This study examines how vaccine rejecting parents socially construct the vaccinating mainstream in opposition to themselves. We analyse qualitative data from interviews with parents in Adelaide, South Australia. Applying insights from Social Identity Theory (SIT), we show how these parents bolster their own sense of identity and self-belief by employing a discourse that casts vaccinators as an Unhealthy Other...
February 12, 2018: Vaccine
John T Jost, Sander van der Linden, Costas Panagopoulos, Curtis D Hardin
Ideological belief systems arise from epistemic, existential, and relational motives to reduce uncertainty, threat, and social discord. According to system justification theory, however, some ideologies-such as those that are conservative, religious, and legitimizing of the status quo-are especially appealing to people whose epistemic, existential, and relational motives are chronically or temporarily heightened. In this article, we focus on relational motivation, describing evidence that conservatives are more likely than liberals to: prioritize values of conformity and tradition; possess a strong desire to share reality with like-minded others; perceive within-group consensus when making political and non-political judgments; be influenced by implicit relational cues and sources who are perceived as similar to them; and maintain homogenous social networks and favor an 'echo chamber' environment that is conducive to the spread of misinformation...
January 12, 2018: Current Opinion in Psychology
Michelle Dugas, Arie W Kruglanski
We draw on the theory of lay epistemics to understand how universal processes of knowledge formation drive the emergence, and determine the consequences of shared reality in groups. In particular, we highlight the role in these processes of the need for cognitive closure and credible epistemic authorities. Whereas the former construct explains why people seek a shared reality, the latter clarifies who the reality is shared with. In this connection, we review relevant bodies of empirical evidence that bear on the epistemic underpinnings of shared reality phenomena...
January 17, 2018: Current Opinion in Psychology
Aviad Raz, Karin R Jongsma, Nitzan Rimon-Zarfaty, Elisabeth Späth, Bosmat Bar-Nadav, Ella Vaintropov, Silke Schicktanz
The important work done by various associations of and for people with disabilities is legitimated by their claim for collective representation. However, there is little empirical research that examines the organizational basis for such claims. We focus on patient/disability advocacy associations that illustrate a split of representation between organizations of and for autism. Drawing on documentary analysis and semi-structured interviews conducted in 2015-2017 with members and office-holders of autism associations in Germany and Israel, we highlight several common gaps and their relations to the organizational characteristics of the associations: Representing only part of the autism spectrum, and lack of efficient procedures for including the variety of members...
January 25, 2018: Social Science & Medicine
Amanda McArthur
Using conversation analysis and a dataset of 171 video recordings of US primary care encounters (2003-2005), this paper examines patients' unsolicited pain informings - e.g. "that hurts" - during the physical examination phase of acute care visits. I argue that when patients experience pain in a physical exam but have not been asked a question like "does that hurt?", they face an interactional dilemma. Having presented their health problem to a doctor, they have tacitly set in motion epistemic and interactional asymmetries through which the doctor investigates the problem on their behalf...
January 16, 2018: Social Science & Medicine
Jesse Bonwitt, Michael Dawson, Martin Kandeh, Rashid Ansumana, Foday Sahr, Hannah Brown, Ann H Kelly
Following the 2013-2016 outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa, governments across the region imposed a ban on the hunting and consumption of meat from wild animals. This injunction was accompanied by public health messages emphasising the infectious potential of wild meat, or 'bushmeat.' Using qualitative methods, we examine the local reception and impact of these interventions. Fieldwork was focused in 9 villages in the Eastern and Southern provinces of Sierra Leone between August and December 2015...
January 31, 2018: Social Science & Medicine
Tom Quick
Argument This paper arrives at a normative position regarding the relevance of Henri Bergson's philosophy to historical enquiry. It does so via experimental historical analysis of the adaptation of cinematographic devices to physiological investigation. Bergson's philosophy accorded well with a mode of physiological psychology in which claims relating to mental and physiological existence interacted. Notably however, cinematograph-centered experimentation by British physiologists including Charles Scott Sherrington, as well as German-trained psychologists such as Hugo Münsterberg and Max Wertheimer, contributed to a cordoning-off of psychological from physiological questioning during the early twentieth century...
December 2017: Science in Context
Sarah Sullivan, Charles Warner-Hillard, Brendan Eagan, Ryan J Thompson, A R Ruis, Krista Haines, Carla M Pugh, David Williamson Shaffer, Hee Soo Jung
BACKGROUND: Epistemic Network Analysis (ENA) is a technique for modeling and comparing the structure of connections between elements in coded data. We hypothesized that connections among team discourse elements as modeled by ENA would predict the quality of team performance in trauma simulation. METHODS: The Modified Non-technical Skills Scale for Trauma (T-NOTECHS) was used to score a simulation-based trauma team resuscitation. Sixteen teams of 5 trainees participated...
February 8, 2018: Surgery
S Emlen Metz, Deena S Weisberg, Michael Weisberg
Why is evolutionary theory controversial among members of the American public? We propose a novel explanation: allegiance to different criteria for belief. In one interview study, two online surveys, and one nationally representative phone poll, we found that evolutionists and creationists take different justifications for belief as legitimate. Those who accept evolution emphasize empirical evidence and scientific consensus. Creationists emphasize not only the Bible and religious authority, but also knowledge of the heart...
February 1, 2018: Cognitive Science
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