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Visceral nerves

Keiko Yamada, Junhui Yuan, Tomoo Mano, Hiroshi Takashima, Masahiko Shibata
BACKGROUND: Hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (HSAN) type II with WNK1/HSN2 gene mutation is a rare disease characterized by early-onset demyelination sensory loss and skin ulceration. To the best of our knowledge, no cases of an autonomic disorder have been reported clearly in a patient with WNK/HSN2 gene mutation and only one case of a Japanese patient with the WNK/HSN2 gene mutation of HSAN type II was previously reported. CASE PRESENTATION: Here we describe a 54-year-old woman who had an early childhood onset of insensitivity to pain; superficial, vibration, and proprioception sensation disturbances; and several symptoms of autonomic failure (e...
October 21, 2016: BMC Neurology
Joana F Sacramento, Maria J Ribeiro, Tiago Rodrigues, Elena Olea, Bernardete F Melo, Maria P Guarino, Rui Fonseca-Pinto, Cristiana R Ferreira, Joana Coelho, Ana Obeso, Raquel Seiça, Paulo Matafome, Sílvia V Conde
AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We recently described that carotid body (CB) over-activation is involved in the aetiology of insulin resistance and arterial hypertension in animal models of the metabolic syndrome. Additionally, we have demonstrated that CB activity is increased in animal models of insulin resistance, and that carotid sinus nerve (CSN) resection prevents the development of insulin resistance and arterial hypertension induced by high-energy diets. Here, we tested whether the functional abolition of CB by CSN transection would reverse pre-established insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, obesity, autonomic dysfunction and hypertension in animal models of the metabolic syndrome...
October 16, 2016: Diabetologia
Dervla O'Malley
Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common disorder characterized by recurrent abdominal pain, bloating and disturbed bowel habit, symptoms which impact on the quality of life of sufferers. The pathophysiological changes underlying this multifactorial condition are complex and include increased sensitivity to luminal and mucosal factors which result in altered colonic transit and visceral pain. Moreover, dysfunctional communication in the bidirectional signaling axis between the brain and the gut, which involves efferent and afferent branches of the peripheral nervous systems, circulating endocrine hormones and local paracrine and neurocrine factors, including immune and perhaps even microbial signaling molecules have a role to play in this disorder...
October 13, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Vanessa S Goodwill, Christopher Terrill, Ian Hopewood, Arthur D Loewy, Mark M Knuepfer
In some patients, renal nerve denervation has been reported to be an effective treatment for essential hypertension. Considerable evidence suggests that afferent renal nerves (ARN) and sodium balance play important roles in the development and maintenance of high blood pressure. ARN are sensitive to sodium concentrations in the renal pelvis. To better understand the role of ARN, we infused isotonic or hypertonic NaCl (308 or 500mOsm) into the left renal pelvis of conscious rats for two 2hours while recording arterial pressure and heart rate...
September 22, 2016: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic & Clinical
Hirotaka Ueda, Mayu Suga, Takakazu Yagi, Ikue Kusumoto-Yoshida, Hideki Kashiwadani, Tomoyuki Kuwaki, Shouichi Miyawaki
The aim of this study was to clarify the effect of vagal afferent activation on salivation and swallowing-like events. Salivation is part of a reflex induced by stimulation of the oral area during feeding or chewing. Recently, we reported that nausea induced by gastro-esophageal reflux (GER) activation produced salivation and swallowing in humans. Here, we investigated the ability of visceral sensation to enhance salivation and swallowing in rodents in order to inform the mechanism of GER-mediated stomatognathic activation...
October 5, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Marina Basalay, Svetlana Mastitskaya, Aleksander Mrochek, Gareth L Ackland, Ana Gutierrez Del Arroyo, Jenifer Sanchez, Per-Ove Sjoquist, John Pernow, Alexander V Gourine, Andrey Gourine
AIMS: Although the nature of the humoral factor which mediates cardioprotection established by remote ischaemic conditioning (RIc) remains unknown, parasympathetic (vagal) mechanisms appear to play a critical role. As the production and release of many gut hormones is modulated by the vagus nerve, here we tested the hypothesis that RIc cardioprotection is mediated by the actions of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). METHODS AND RESULTS: A rat model of myocardial infarction (coronary artery occlusion followed by reperfusion) was used...
October 4, 2016: Cardiovascular Research
Mohammad Heidari, Dan Wang, Phillip Delekta, Shuhong Sun
Marek's disease virus (MDV), a highly cell-associated lymphotropic α-herpesvirus, is the causative agent of Marek's disease (MD) in domestic chickens. MDV replicates in chicken lymphocytes and establishes a latent infection within CD4(+) T cells. The latently infected CD4(+) T cells carry the virus to visceral organs, peripheral nerves, and feather follicle epithelium (FFE). FFE is the only anatomical site where infectious enveloped cell-free virus particles are produced and disseminated into the environment...
November 1, 2016: Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology
Nick J Spencer, Julian Sorensen, Lee Travis, Lukasz Wiklendt, Marcello C Costa, Timothy James Hibberd
In vertebrates, visceral pain from internal organs is detected by spinal afferents, whose cell bodies lie in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). Until now, all recordings from spinal afferents have been restricted to recording transmission of action potentials along axons, or from cell bodies lying outside their target organ, which is not where sensory transduction occurs. Our aim was to record directly from a major class of spinal afferent within visceral organs, where transduction of sensory stimuli into action potentials takes place...
September 22, 2016: American Journal of Physiology. Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Timothy Woo, Thuzar Win
INTRODUCTION: Infantile myofibromatosis (IM) is a rare paediatric fibrous tumour also known as a desmoid tumour that occurs in around 1:150000 live births. It manifests as solitary or multicentric fibrous masses in the musculoaponeurotic soft tissues and can affect the visceral organs and bones. CASE DISCUSSION: We report a case of infantile myofibromatosis of the gluteus maximus muscle in an 18-day old neonate presenting atypically as a case of developmental dysplasia of the hip due to local involvement of the sciatic nerve...
September 7, 2016: Hip International: the Journal of Clinical and Experimental Research on Hip Pathology and Therapy
Greg Dussor, Yu-Qing Cao
Migraine is among the most common diseases on earth and one of the most disabling, the latter due in large part to poor treatment efficacy. Development of new therapeutics is dependent on the identification of mechanisms contributing to migraine and discovery of targets for new drugs. Numerous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have implicated the transient receptor-potential M8 (TRPM8) channel in migraine. This channel is predominantly expressed on peripheral sensory neurons and is known as the sensor for cold temperature in cutaneous tissue but is also expressed on deep visceral afferents where cold is not likely a stimulus...
October 2016: Headache
María A Zafra, Antonio D R Agüera, María J Simón, Filomena Molina, Amadeo Puerto
Sensory information from the gastrointestinal system can be transmitted to the brain through the vagus nerve, the intermediate-caudal region of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NST), and various subnuclei of the parabrachial complex, notably the external lateral subnucleus (LPBe). The objective of the present study was to examine the relevance of this subnucleus in satiation and food reintake after gastrointestinal food removal. LPBe-lesioned animals were subjected to a re-intake task following the partial withdrawal of gastric food contents shortly after satiation...
September 11, 2016: Brain Research Bulletin
Robin Spiller
Although over half of patients over 65 years old will have diverticulosis, only a minority experience symptoms. These are often similar to those of irritable bowel syndrome with pain and disordered bowel habit, but differ in having an onset in the sixth to seventh decade. The underlying mechanisms include visceral hypersensitivity which maybe postinflammatory, but may also be due to altered central pain processing. Somatization is a useful clue to a predominantly central pathology, while its absence points to local causes including altered enteric nerves and mucosal immune activation...
October 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Elena N Temereva, Igor A Kosevich
BACKGROUND: The Bryozoa (=Ectoprocta) is a large group of bilaterians that exhibit great variability in the innervation of tentacles and in the organization of the cerebral ganglion. Investigations of bryozoans from different groups may contribute to the reconstruction of the bryozoan nervous system bauplan. A detailed investigation of the polypide nervous system of the ctenostome bryozoan Amathia gracilis is reported here. RESULTS: The cerebral ganglion displays prominent zonality and has at least three zones: proximal, central, and distal...
2016: BMC Evolutionary Biology
M Million, M Larauche
Made up of millions of enteric neurons and glial cells, the enteric nervous system (ENS) is in a key position to modulate the secretomotor function and visceral pain of the gastrointestinal tract. The early life developmental period, through which most of the ENS development occurs, is highly susceptible to microenvironmental perturbation. Over the past decade, accumulating evidence has shown the impact of stress and early life adversity (ELA) on host gastrointestinal pathophysiology. While most of the focus has been on alterations in brain structure and function, limited experimental work in rodents suggest that the enteric nervous system can also be directly affected, as shown by changes in the number, phenotype, and reactivity of enteric nerves...
September 2016: Neurogastroenterology and Motility: the Official Journal of the European Gastrointestinal Motility Society
Sivasai Balivada, Hitesh N Pawar, Shawnee Montgomery, Michael J Kenney
Ghrelin influences immune system function and modulates the sympathetic nervous system; however, the contribution of ghrelin to neural-immune interactions is not well-established because the effect of ghrelin on splenic sympathetic nerve discharge (SND) is not known. This study tested the hypothesis that central ghrelin administration would inhibit splenic SND in anesthetized rats. Rats received intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of ghrelin (1nmol/kg) or aCSF. Lumbar SND recordings provided a non-visceral nerve control...
August 19, 2016: Autonomic Neuroscience: Basic & Clinical
Jeremy R Glissen Brown, Gregory R Bernstein, Frank K Friedenberg, Adam C Ehrlich
Chronic abdominal wall pain (CAWP) refers to a condition wherein pain originates from the abdominal wall itself rather than the underlying viscera. According to various estimates, 10% to 30% of patients with chronic abdominal pain are eventually diagnosed with CAWP, usually after expensive testing has failed to uncover another etiology. The most common cause of CAWP is anterior cutaneous nerve entrapment syndrome. The diagnosis of CAWP is made using an oft-forgotten physical examination finding known as Carnett's sign, where focal abdominal tenderness is either the same or worsened during contraction of the abdominal musculature...
November 2016: Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology
Leonardo Kapural, Suneil Jolly
Treatment of persistent pain from chronic pancreatitis historically was difficult to treat. For years, focus was on opioid and other analgesics and psychological treatments. Recent studies provided evidence for decrease in analgesic intake and pain scores after properly conducted sympathetic blocks (celiac, splanchnic nerve blocks). These therapies should be considered as parts of a multimodal analgesic strategy. Animal studies suggest that spinal cord stimulation suppresses visceral hyperalgesia. Large case series of spinal cord stimulation demonstrated a significant pain relief in patients with chronic pancreatitis...
September 2016: Current Treatment Options in Gastroenterology
Julian Yanez, Yara Souto, Laura Pineiro, Monica Folgueira, Ramon Anadon
The central connections of the gustatory/general visceral system of the adult zebrafish (Danio rerio) were examined by means of carbocyanine dye tracing. Main primary gustatory centers (facial and vagal lobes) received sensory projections from the facial and vagal nerves, respectively. The vagal nerve also projects to the commissural nucleus of Cajal, a general visceral sensory center. These primary centers mainly project on a prominent secondary gustatory and general visceral nucleus (SGN/V) located in the isthmic region...
June 24, 2016: Journal of Comparative Neurology
Bin Li, Qian-Xing Zhuang, He-Ren Gao, Jian-Jun Wang, Jing-Ning Zhu
The cerebellum, a hindbrain motor center, also participates in regulating nonsomatic visceral activities such as feeding control. However, the underlying neural mechanism is largely unknown. Here, we investigate whether the cerebellar medial nucleus (MN), one of the final outputs of the cerebellum, could directly project to and modulate the feeding-related neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus (VMN), which has been traditionally implicated in feeding behavior, energy balance, and body weight regulation...
June 24, 2016: Brain Structure & Function
Carolyn W Roman, Victor A Derkach, Richard D Palmiter
The central nervous system controls food consumption to maintain metabolic homoeostasis. In response to a meal, visceral signals from the gut activate neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) via the vagus nerve. These NTS neurons then excite brain regions known to mediate feeding behaviour, such as the lateral parabrachial nucleus (PBN). We previously described a neural circuit for appetite suppression involving calcitonin gene-related protein (CGRP)-expressing PBN (CGRP(PBN)) neurons; however, the molecular identity of the inputs to these neurons was not established...
2016: Nature Communications
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