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Lynch syndrome, hereditary cancer, mutation, mismatch repair gene

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28895526/molecular-testing-for-lynch-syndrome-in-people-with-colorectal-cancer-systematic-reviews-and-economic-evaluation
#1
Tristan Snowsill, Helen Coelho, Nicola Huxley, Tracey Jones-Hughes, Simon Briscoe, Ian M Frayling, Chris Hyde
BACKGROUND: Inherited mutations in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair (MMR) genes lead to an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC), gynaecological cancers and other cancers, known as Lynch syndrome (LS). Risk-reducing interventions can be offered to individuals with known LS-causing mutations. The mutations can be identified by comprehensive testing of the MMR genes, but this would be prohibitively expensive in the general population. Tumour-based tests - microsatellite instability (MSI) and MMR immunohistochemistry (IHC) - are used in CRC patients to identify individuals at high risk of LS for genetic testing...
September 2017: Health Technology Assessment: HTA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28840050/gastric-medullary-carcinoma-with-sporadic-mismatch-repair-deficiency-and-a-tp53-r273c-mutation-an-unusual-case-with-wild-type-braf
#2
Brett M Lowenthal, Theresa W Chan, John A Thorson, Kaitlyn J Kelly, Thomas J Savides, Mark A Valasek
Medullary carcinoma has long been recognized as a subtype of colorectal cancer associated with microsatellite instability and Lynch syndrome. Gastric medullary carcinoma is a very rare neoplasm. We report a 67-year-old male who presented with a solitary gastric mass. Total gastrectomy revealed a well-demarcated, poorly differentiated carcinoma with an organoid growth pattern, pushing borders, and abundant peritumoral lymphocytic response. The prior cytology was cellular with immunohistochemical panel consistent with upper gastrointestinal/pancreaticobiliary origin...
2017: Case Reports in Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28820751/importance-of-pcr-based-tumor-testing-in-the-evaluation-of-lynch-syndrome-associated-endometrial-cancer
#3
Amanda S Bruegl, Annessa Kernberg, Russell R Broaddus
Lynch syndrome (LS) is a hereditary cancer syndrome caused by a germline mutation in a DNA mismatch repair gene, usually MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, or PMS2. The most common cancers associated with LS are colorectal adenocarcinoma and endometrial carcinoma. Identification of women with LS-associated endometrial cancer is important, as these women and their affected siblings and children are at-risk of developing these same cancers. Germline testing of all endometrial cancer patients is not cost effective, and screening using young age of cancer diagnosis and/or presence of family history of syndrome-associated is underutilized and ineffective...
August 17, 2017: Advances in Anatomic Pathology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28819720/immunohistochemical-null-phenotype-for-mismatch-repair-proteins-in-colonic-carcinoma-associated-with-concurrent-mlh1-hypermethylation-and-msh2-somatic-mutations
#4
Tao Wang, Zsofia K Stadler, Liying Zhang, Martin R Weiser, Olca Basturk, Jaclyn F Hechtman, Efsevia Vakiani, Lenard B Saltz, David S Klimstra, Jinru Shia
Microsatellite instability, a well-established driver pathway in colorectal carcinogenesis, can develop in both sporadic and hereditary conditions via different molecular alterations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. MMR protein immunohistochemistry (IHC) is currently widely used for the detection of MMR deficiency in solid tumors. The IHC test, however, can show varied staining patterns, posing challenges in the interpretation of the staining results in some cases. Here we report a case of an 80-year-old female with a colonic adenocarcinoma that exhibited an unusual "null" IHC staining pattern with complete loss of all four MMR proteins (MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2)...
August 17, 2017: Familial Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28764791/metachronous-colorectal-carcinoma-with-massive-submucosal-invasion-detected-by-annual-surveillance-in-a-lynch-syndrome-patient-a-case-report
#5
Masashi Utsumi, Kohji Tanakaya, Yutaka Mushiake, Tomoyoshi Kunitomo, Isao Yasuhara, Fumitaka Taniguchi, Takashi Arata, Koh Katsuda, Hideki Aoki, Hitoshi Takeuchi
BACKGROUND: Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal carcinoma. It is characterized by the presence of germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes. Mutation carriers have a lifetime risk of developing colorectal carcinoma of approximately 80%. Current treatment guidelines recommend periodic surveillance for colorectal carcinoma in patients with Lynch syndrome. However, the optimal interval between colonoscopies has not yet been determined. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe a 54-year-old man with Lynch syndrome who was undergoing annual colonoscopy surveillance for the development of colorectal carcinoma...
August 1, 2017: World Journal of Surgical Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28749454/the-association-of-low-penetrance-variants-in-dna-repair-genes-with-colorectal-cancer-a-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#6
Nikhil Aggarwal, Neil D Donald, Salim Malik, Subothini S Selvendran, Mark Jw McPhail, Kevin J Monahan
OBJECTIVES: Approximately 35% of colorectal cancer (CRC) risk is attributable to heritable factors known hereditary syndromes, accounting for 6%. The remainder may be due to lower penetrance polymorphisms particularly of DNA repair genes. DNA repair pathways, including base excision repair (BER), nucleotide excision repair (NER), mismatch repair (MMR), direct reversal repair (DRR), and double-strand break repair are complex, evolutionarily conserved, and critical in carcinogenesis. Germline mutations in these genes are associated with high-penetrance CRC syndromes such as Lynch syndrome...
July 27, 2017: Clinical and Translational Gastroenterology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28699072/expending-role-of-microsatellite-instability-in-diagnosis-and-treatment-of-colorectal-cancers
#7
REVIEW
Liisa Chang, Minna Chang, Hanna M Chang, Fuju Chang
BACKGROUND: Colorectal carcinomas with high-frequency microsatellite instability (MSI-H) account for 15% of all colorectal cancers, including 12% of sporadic cases and 3% of cancers associated with Lynch syndrome (also known as hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer syndrome, HNPCC). Lynch syndrome is an autosomal dominant hereditary cancer syndrome, caused by germline mutations in mismatch repair genes, including MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. METHODS: Published articles from peer-reviewed journals were obtained from PubMed, Google Scholar and Clinicaltrials...
July 11, 2017: Journal of Gastrointestinal Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28696559/genetic-testing-for-hereditary-nonpolyposis-colorectal-cancer-hnpcc
#8
Babi Ramesh Reddy Nallamilli, Madhuri Hegde
Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also called Lynch syndrome, is an autosomal dominant cancer syndrome that confers an elevated risk of early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) and increased lifetime risk for other cancers of the endometrium, stomach, small intestine, hepatobiliary system, kidney, ureter, and ovary. Lynch syndrome accounts for up to 3% of all CRC, making it the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome. Germline mutations in methyl-directed mismatch repair (MMR) genes give rise to microsatellite instability (MSI) in tumor DNA...
July 11, 2017: Current Protocols in Human Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28607805/simplified-microsatellite-instability-detection-protocol-provides-equivalent-sensitivity-to-robust-detection-strategies-in-lynch-syndrome-patients
#9
Hadi Babaei, Mehrdad Zeinalian, Mohammad Hassan Emami, Mortaza Hashemzadeh, Najmeh Farahani, Rasoul Salehi
OBJECTIVE: : Germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes cause Lynch syndrome (LS). LS is an inherited disease, and an important consequence of MMR deficiency is microsatellite instability (MSI) phenotype. MSI phenotype influences the efficacy of 5 fluorouracil (5-FU) chemotherapy. Reproducible, cost effective, and easy to perform laboratory tests are required to include MSI detection in routine laboratory practice. Evaluation of CAT25 as monomorphic short tandem repeat sequence enables CAT25 to be an efficient screening tool among hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) patients compared with other methods used currently...
May 2017: Cancer Biology & Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28573495/rnf43-is-mutated-less-frequently-in-lynch-syndrome-compared-with-sporadic-microsatellite-unstable-colorectal-cancers
#10
Lochlan J Fennell, Mark Clendenning, Diane M McKeone, Saara H Jamieson, Samanthy Balachandran, Jennifer Borowsky, John Liu, Futoshi Kawamata, Catherine E Bond, Christophe Rosty, Matthew E Burge, Daniel D Buchanan, Barbara A Leggett, Vicki L J Whitehall
The WNT signaling pathway is commonly altered during colorectal cancer development. The E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF43, negatively regulates the WNT signal through increased ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of the Frizzled receptor. RNF43 has recently been reported to harbor frequent truncating frameshift mutations in sporadic microsatellite unstable (MSI) colorectal cancers. This study assesses the relative frequency of RNF43 mutations in hereditary colorectal cancers arising in the setting of Lynch syndrome...
June 1, 2017: Familial Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28531214/suspected-lynch-syndrome-associated-msh6-variants-a-functional-assay-to-determine-their-pathogenicity
#11
Hellen Houlleberghs, Anne Goverde, Jarnick Lusseveld, Marleen Dekker, Marco J Bruno, Fred H Menko, Arjen R Mensenkamp, Manon C W Spaander, Anja Wagner, Robert M W Hofstra, Hein Te Riele
Lynch syndrome (LS) is a hereditary cancer predisposition caused by inactivating mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Mutations in the MSH6 DNA MMR gene account for approximately 18% of LS cases. Many LS-associated sequence variants are nonsense and frameshift mutations that clearly abrogate MMR activity. However, missense mutations whose functional implications are unclear are also frequently seen in suspected-LS patients. To conclusively diagnose LS and enroll patients in appropriate surveillance programs to reduce morbidity as well as mortality, the functional consequences of these variants of uncertain clinical significance (VUS) must be defined...
May 2017: PLoS Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28514183/multigene-panel-testing-provides-a-new-perspective-on-lynch-syndrome
#12
COMPARATIVE STUDY
Carin R Espenschied, Holly LaDuca, Shuwei Li, Rachel McFarland, Chia-Ling Gau, Heather Hampel
Purpose Most existing literature describes Lynch syndrome (LS) as a hereditary syndrome leading to high risks of colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer mainly as a result of mutations in MLH1 and MSH2. Most of these studies were performed on cohorts with disease suggestive of hereditary CRC and population-based CRC and endometrial cancer cohorts, possibly biasing results. We aimed to describe a large cohort of mismatch repair (MMR) mutation carriers ascertained through multigene panel testing, evaluate their phenotype, and compare the results with those of previous studies...
August 1, 2017: Journal of Clinical Oncology: Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28481244/incomplete-segregation-of-msh6-frameshift-variants-with-phenotype-of-lynch-syndrome
#13
Raffaella Liccardo, Marina De Rosa, Giovanni Battista Rossi, Nicola Carlomagno, Paola Izzo, Francesca Duraturo
Abstract: Lynch syndrome (LS), the most frequent form of hereditary colorectal cancer, involves mutations in mismatch repair genes. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MSH6 from 97 subjects negative for mutations in MLH1 and MSH2. By direct sequencing, we identified 27 MSH6 variants, of which, nine were novel. To verify the pathogenicity of these novel variants, we performed in silico and segregation analyses. Three novel variants were predicted by in silico analysis as damaging mutations and segregated with the disease phenotype; while a novel frameshift deletion variant that was predicted to yield a premature stop codon did not segregate with the LS phenotype in three of four cases in the family...
May 6, 2017: International Journal of Molecular Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28474162/-hereditary-colorectal-cancer-an-update-on-genetics-and-entities-in-terms-of-differential-diagnosis
#14
REVIEW
T T Rau, H Dawson, A Hartmann, J Rüschoff
The pathologist can contribute to recognizing hereditary causes of colorectal cancer via morphology. By identifying so-called index patients, it is possible to take preventive measures in affected families. The precise definition of the clinical presentation and the histopathological phenotype help to narrow the spectrum of expected genetic alterations. Novelties within Lynch syndrome include the recognition of EPCAM as a fifth gene locus, as well as the newly defined Lynch-like syndrome with evidence of somatic mismatch repair (MMR) mutations...
May 2017: Der Pathologe
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28471193/-molecular-pathology-of-colorectal-cancer-microsatellite-instability-the-detection-the-relationship-to-the-pathophysiology-and-prognosis
#15
V Brychtová, R Šefr, R Hrstka, P Vídeňská, B Bencsiková, B Hanáková, L Zdražilová Dubská, R Nenutil, E Budinská
BACKGROUND: Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is third most common cancer worldwide with very heterogenous character. In most cases, it is caused by sporadic events leading to disruption of epithelial cells of the colon. The minority evolves from germline mutations associated with hereditary cancer syndromes. Mechanisms leading to mutations of oncogenes, tumour suppressors and genes of DNA repair mechanisms include: 1. chromosomal instability, 2. microsatellite instability and 3. CpG island methylator phenotype...
2017: Klinická Onkologie: Casopis Ceské a Slovenské Onkologické Spolecnosti
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28449805/spectrum-of-mismatch-repair-gene-mutations-and-clinical-presentation-of-hispanic-individuals-with-lynch-syndrome
#16
Annette Y Sunga, Charité Ricker, Carin R Espenschied, Danielle Castillo, Marilena Melas, Josef Herzog, Sarah Bannon, Marcia Cruz-Correa, Patrick Lynch, Ilana Solomon, Stephen B Gruber, Jeffrey N Weitzel
Lynch syndrome (LS), the most common hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome, is caused by mismatch repair (MMR) gene mutations. However, data about MMR mutations in Hispanics are limited. This study aims to describe the spectrum of MMR mutations in Hispanics with LS and explore ancestral origins. This case series involved an IRB-approved retrospective chart review of self-identified Hispanic patients (n = 397) seen for genetic cancer risk assessment at four collaborating academic institutions in California, Texas, and Puerto Rico who were evaluated by MMR genotyping and/or tumor analysis...
April 2017: Cancer Genetics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28365877/elucidating-the-clinical-significance-of-two-pms2-missense-variants-coexisting-in-a-family-fulfilling-hereditary-cancer-criteria
#17
Maribel González-Acosta, Jesús Del Valle, Matilde Navarro, Bryony A Thompson, Sílvia Iglesias, Xavier Sanjuan, María José Paúles, Natàlia Padilla, Anna Fernández, Raquel Cuesta, Àlex Teulé, Guido Plotz, Juan Cadiñanos, Xavier de la Cruz, Francesc Balaguer, Conxi Lázaro, Marta Pineda, Gabriel Capellá
The clinical spectrum of germline mismatch repair (MMR) gene variants continues increasing, encompassing Lynch syndrome, Constitutional MMR Deficiency (CMMRD), and the recently reported MSH3-associated polyposis. Genetic diagnosis of these hereditary cancer syndromes is often hampered by the presence of variants of unknown significance (VUS) and overlapping phenotypes. Two PMS2 VUS, c.2149G>A (p.V717M) and c.2444C>T (p.S815L), were identified in trans in one individual diagnosed with early-onset colorectal cancer (CRC) who belonged to a family fulfilling clinical criteria for hereditary cancer...
April 1, 2017: Familial Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28283864/lower-gastrointestinal-neuroendocrine-neoplasms-associated-with-hereditary-cancer-syndromes-a-case-series
#18
Trilokesh D Kidambi, Christina Pedley, Amie Blanco, Emily K Bergsland, Jonathan P Terdiman
Lower gastrointestinal (GI) neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) of the colon and rectum are uncommon and not traditionally associated with hereditary GI cancer syndromes. However, with widespread implementation of colorectal cancer screening programs, lower GI NENs are being identified with increasing frequency. We report the first case series of six patients with lower GI NENs who were diagnosed with hereditary GI cancer syndromes by germline testing. Two patients presented with poorly differentiated rectal neuroendocrine carcinoma (NECs) with colonic polyposis and were found to have Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and MYH-Associated Polyposis, respectively...
March 10, 2017: Familial Cancer
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28250766/novel-implications-in-molecular-diagnosis-of-lynch-syndrome
#19
REVIEW
Raffaella Liccardo, Marina De Rosa, Paola Izzo, Francesca Duraturo
About 10% of total colorectal cancers are associated with known Mendelian inheritance, as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP) and Lynch syndrome (LS). In these cancer types the clinical manifestations of disease are due to mutations in high-risk alleles, with a penetrance at least of 70%. The LS is associated with germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. However, the mutation detection analysis of these genes does not always provide informative results for genetic counseling of LS patients...
2017: Gastroenterology Research and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28135145/cancer-susceptibility-gene-mutations-in-individuals-with-colorectal-cancer
#20
Matthew B Yurgelun, Matthew H Kulke, Charles S Fuchs, Brian A Allen, Hajime Uno, Jason L Hornick, Chinedu I Ukaegbu, Lauren K Brais, Philip G McNamara, Robert J Mayer, Deborah Schrag, Jeffrey A Meyerhardt, Kimmie Ng, John Kidd, Nanda Singh, Anne-Renee Hartman, Richard J Wenstrup, Sapna Syngal
Purpose Hereditary factors play an important role in colorectal cancer (CRC) risk, yet the prevalence of germline cancer susceptibility gene mutations in patients with CRC unselected for high-risk features (eg, early age at diagnosis, personal/family history of cancer or polyps, tumor microsatellite instability [MSI], mismatch repair [MMR] deficiency) is unknown. Patients and Methods We recruited 1,058 participants who received CRC care in a clinic-based setting without preselection for age at diagnosis, personal/family history, or MSI/MMR results...
April 1, 2017: Journal of Clinical Oncology: Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
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