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Pelvic floor muscle training

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542276/effect-of-combined-actions-of-hip-adduction-abduction-on-the-force-generation-and-maintenance-of-pelvic-floor-muscles-in-healthy-women
#1
Amanda C Amorim, Licia P Cacciari, Anice C Passaro, Simone R B Silveira, Cesar F Amorim, Jefferson F Loss, Isabel C N Sacco
Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) force and coordination are related to urinary incontinence severity and to sexual satisfaction. Health professionals frequently combine classic PFM exercises with hip adduction/abduction contraction to treat these disorders, but the real benefits of this practice are still unknown. Based on a theoretical anatomy approach whereby the levator ani muscle is inserted into the obturator internus myofascia and in which force generated by hip movements should increase the contraction quality of PFMs, our aim was to investigate the effects of isometric hip adduction and abduction on PFM force generation...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508398/effect-of-electromyographic-biofeedback-as-an-add-on-to-pelvic-floor-muscle-exercises-on-neuromuscular-outcomes-and-quality-of-life-in-postmenopausal-women-with-stress-urinary-incontinence-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#2
Adriane Bertotto, Renata Schvartzman, Silvana Uchôa, Maria Celeste Osório Wender
AIMS: To compare the efficacy of pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME) with and without electromyographic biofeedback (BF) in increasing muscle strength, improving myoelectric activity, and improving pre-contraction and quality of life in postmenopausal women with stress urinary incontinence. METHODS: Randomized controlled trial of 49 postmenopausal women with stress urinary incontinence. Participants were allocated across three groups: control, PFME alone, and PFME + BF...
May 16, 2017: Neurourology and Urodynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28499536/recognizing-and-managing-common-urogynecologic-disorders
#3
REVIEW
Denise M Elser
Many women experience urogynecologic or pelvic floor disorders, especially urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. The obstetrician/gynecologist is often the first health care professional to evaluate and treat these disorders. Treatments include pelvic floor muscle training, behavioral therapies, oral medications, neuromodulation, intradetrusor medications, and surgery. When approaching the woman with symptomatic prolapse, familiarity with pessaries and various surgical procedures aid in counseling...
June 2017: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28499001/is-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-a-physical-therapy-or-a-behavioral-therapy-a-call-to-name-and-report-the-physical-cognitive-and-behavioral-elements
#4
Helena C Frawley, Sarah G Dean, Susan C Slade, E Jean C Hay-Smith
This perspective article explores whether pelvic-floor muscle training (PFMT) for the management of female urinary incontinence and prolapse is a physical therapy or a behavioral therapy. The primary aim is to demonstrate that it is both. A secondary aim is to show that the plethora of terms used for PFMT is potentially confusing and that current terminology inadequately represents the full intent, content, and delivery of this complex intervention. While physical therapists may be familiar with exercise terms, the details are often incompletely reported; furthermore, physical therapists are less familiar with the terminology used in accurately representing cognitive and behavioral therapy interventions, which results in these elements being even less well reported...
April 1, 2017: Physical Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28483745/mobile-app-for-treatment-of-stress-urinary-incontinence-a-cost-effectiveness-analysis
#5
Malin Sjöström, Lars Lindholm, Eva Samuelsson
BACKGROUND: Mobile apps can increase access to care, facilitate self-management, and improve adherence to treatment. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) affects 10-35% of women and, currently, an app with instructions for pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is available as first-line treatment. A previous randomized controlled study demonstrated that the app benefitted symptom severity and quality of life (QoL); in this study we investigate the cost-effectiveness of the app. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the health economy of the app for treating SUI...
May 8, 2017: Journal of Medical Internet Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464434/the-effects-of-pilates-method-on-pelvic-floor-muscle-strength-in-patients-with-post-prostatectomy-urinary-incontinence-a-randomized-clinical-trial
#6
Cíntia S Gomes, Fabiana R Pedriali, Mariana R Urbano, Eliane H Moreira, Marcio A Averbeck, Silvio Henrique M Almeida
AIMS: To assess the effects of a Pilates exercise program compared to conventional pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) protocol on pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. METHODS: Patients were randomized into three treatment groups (G1: Pilates, G2: electrical stimulation combined with PFMT, and G3: control group). Duration of therapy was 10 weeks. Baseline assessment included the 24 h pad-test and the ICI-Q questionnaire...
May 2, 2017: Neurourology and Urodynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464426/structured-behavioral-treatment-research-protocol-for-women-with-mixed-urinary-incontinence-and-overactive-bladder-symptoms
#7
REVIEW
Diane K Newman, Diane Borello-France, Vivian W Sung
AIMS: The primary aim is to provide detailed rationale and methodology for the development and implementation of a perioperative behavioral/pelvic floor exercise research protocol for women who self-chose surgical intervention and who may or may not have been offered behavioral treatments initially. This protocol is part of the ESTEEM trial (Effects of Surgical Treatment Enhanced with Exercise for Mixed Urinary Incontinence Trial) which was designed to determine the effect of a combined surgical and perioperative behavioral/pelvic floor exercise intervention versus surgery alone on improving mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) and overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms...
May 2, 2017: Neurourology and Urodynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28451797/-repetitive-peripheral-muscle-stimulation-vs-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-comparison-of-two-approaches-to-incontinence-treatment
#8
Sabine Schrank, Laura Adlbrecht, Hanna Mayer
BACKGROUND: Although there are various measures for the prevention, treatment, and management of urinary incontinence (UI), absorbing aids (and only scant continence-promoting measures) are primarily used in nursing homes in Austria. Repetitive peripheral muscle stimulation (RPMS) is already used as a common method for the treatment and prevention of incontinence in the outpatient setting and is an effective alternative compared to the usual incontinence treatments. However, there are no empirical data as yet on the effect of RPMS in nursing home residents...
April 27, 2017: Zeitschrift Für Gerontologie und Geriatrie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28443787/ultrasound-based-motor-control-training-for-the-pelvic-floor-pre-and-post-prostatectomy-scoring-reliability-and-skill-acquisition
#9
Stuart Doorbar-Baptist, Roger Adams, Trudy Rebbeck
AIM: This study documents a protocol designed to evaluate pelvic floor motor control in men with prostate cancer. It also aims to evaluate the reliability of therapists in rating motor control of pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) using real time ultrasound imaging (RUSI) video clips. We further determine predictors of acquiring motor control. METHODS: Ninety-one men diagnosed with prostate cancer attending a physiotherapy clinic for pelvic floor exercises were taught detailed pelvic floor motor control exercises by a physiotherapist using trans-abdominal RUSI for biofeedback...
April 2017: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28339839/recent-advances-in-understanding-pelvic-floor-tissue-of-women-with-and-without-pelvic-organ-prolapse-considerations-for-physical-therapists
#10
Kimberly Saunders
Pelvic organ prolapse is a fairly common condition that imposes significant symptoms, diminished quality of life, social burden, financial expense, and surgical risk on women. As evidence supporting the benefit of pelvic-floor muscle training in nonsurgical management of pelvic organ prolapse grows, physical therapists are becoming a provider of choice interacting with women affected by pelvic organ prolapse. This perspective article will review recent research on tissue characteristics of 3 key components of pelvic organ support: skeletal muscle, ligament, and vaginal wall...
April 1, 2017: Physical Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28335792/can-incontinence-be-cured-a-systematic-review-of-cure-rates
#11
Rob Riemsma, Suzanne Hagen, Ruth Kirschner-Hermanns, Christine Norton, Helle Wijk, Karl-Erik Andersson, Christopher Chapple, Julian Spinks, Adrian Wagg, Edward Hutt, Kate Misso, Sohan Deshpande, Jos Kleijnen, Ian Milsom
BACKGROUND: Incontinence constitutes a major health problem affecting millions of people worldwide. The present study aims to assess cure rates from treating urinary (UI) or fecal incontinence (FI) and the number of people who may remain dependent on containment strategies. METHODS: Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), CINAHL, and PEDro were searched from January 2005 to June 2015. Supplementary searches included conference abstracts and trials registers (2013-2015)...
March 24, 2017: BMC Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28287977/neurostimulation-strategy-for-stress-urinary-incontinence
#12
Xuechen Huang, Kaihui Zheng, Sam Kohan, Petcharat May Denprasert, Limin Liao, Gerald E Loeb
We have developed a percutaneously implantable and wireless microstimulator (NuStim®) to exercise the pelvic floor muscles for treatment of stress urinary incontinence. It produces a wide range of charge-regulated electrical stimulation pulses and trains of pulses using a simple electronic circuit that receives power and timing information from an externally generated RF magnetic field. The complete system was validated in vitro and in vivo in preclinical studies demonstrating that the NuStim can be successfully implanted into an effective, low threshold location and the implant can be operated chronically to produce effective and well-tolerated contractions of skeletal muscle...
March 7, 2017: IEEE Transactions on Neural Systems and Rehabilitation Engineering
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28284822/-algorithms-and-urinary-incontinence-in-the-elderly-assessment-treatment-recommendations-and-levels-of-evidence-review
#13
P Meyer
OBJECTIVES: Search processing algorithms in a primary care setting, analyzing the specifics of care management for seniors suffering from urinary incontinence (UI), described the recommendations and levels of evidence of treatment. METHODS: A literature review carried out via PubMed(®) and websites of scientific societies with search keywords classified according to an algorithm. RESULTS: One hundred algorithms have been discovered in the field of evaluation and treatment of UI...
March 2017: Progrès en Urologie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28252827/the-effect-of-rehabilitation-exercises-combined-with-direct-vagina-low-voltage-low-frequency-electric-stimulation-on-pelvic-nerve-electrophysiology-and-tissue-function-in-primiparous-women-a-randomised-controlled-trial
#14
Sumian Yang, Wenshu Sang, Jing Feng, Haifeng Zhao, Xian Li, Ping Li, Hongfang Fan, Zengjun Tang, Lina Gao
AIM AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of rehabilitation exercises combined with Direct Vagina Low Voltage Low Frequency Electric Stimulation (DES) on pelvic nerve electrophysiology and tissue function after delivery. BACKGROUND: Whether and how DES effects pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD) are not known clearly. DESIGN: This was a randomised, controlled clinical trial. METHODS: The 189 primiparous women 20-35 years old and with an episiotomy or second degree episiotomy tear were divided into three groups: the control group (n = 60) received routine postpartum guidance 2 hr postpartum, the training group (n = 63) performed rehabilitation exercises (Kegel exercises and pelvic movements) from 2 days postpartum until 3 months postpartum, and the combination group (n = 66) received DES 15 times (3 times a week for 30 min at a time) beginning at the sixth week postpartum in addition to performing rehabilitation exercises...
March 2, 2017: Journal of Clinical Nursing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28187840/pelvic-floor-muscle-training-to-manage-overactive-bladder-and-urinary-incontinence
#15
Kimberly Angelini
Overactive bladder (OAB) and urinary incontinence (UI) are common chronic conditions that can negatively affect women's quality of life. Pelvic floor muscle training is the first-line treatment. Two recent Cochrane Reviews examining pelvic floor muscle training for the treatment of UI and OAB are summarized here to provide women's health nurses with current recommendations for UI and OAB management. This column also identifies practice improvement education in the area of pelvic floor muscle training and treatment for OAB and UI...
February 2017: Nursing for Women's Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28178026/pelvic-floor-muscle-training-for-the-prevention-of-urinary-incontinence-in-antenatal-and-postnatal-women-a-best-practice-implementation-project
#16
Weijie Xing, Yu Zhang, Chunyi Gu, Lucylynn Lizarondo
BACKGROUND: Pregnancy and vaginal delivery may cause urinary incontinence (UI) in some women, which can impact on their quality of life. Pelvic floor muscles training (PFMT) is a safe and effective intervention for preventing UI associated with pregnancy. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this evidence-implementation project was to promote PFMT to prevent UI among antenatal and postnatal women in an obstetric and gynecological hospital in China. METHODS: A clinical audit was undertaken using the Joanna Briggs Institute Practical Application of Clinical Evidence System tool...
February 2017: JBI Database of Systematic Reviews and Implementation Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28169458/outpatient-biofeedback-in-addition-to-home-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-for-stress-urinary-incontinence-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#17
Fátima Faní Fitz, Liliana Stüpp, Thaís Fonseca da Costa, Maria Augusta Tezelli Bortolini, Manoel João Batista Castello Girão, Rodrigo Aquino Castro
AIMS: To test if biofeedback (BF) added to pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) increases the frequency of home exercises performed by women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI). METHODS: 72 incontinent women were randomized to BF (outpatient BF + home PFMT) or PFMT (outpatient PFMT + home PFMT) groups. ASSESSMENTS: baseline, after 3 months of supervised treatment, at 9-month follow-up (after six additional months of home PFMT only)...
February 7, 2017: Neurourology and Urodynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28124534/percutaneous-tibial-nerve-stimulation-versus-electrical-stimulation-with-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-for-overactive-bladder-syndrome-in-women-results-of-a-randomized-controlled-study
#18
Carlo Vecchioli Scaldazza, Carolina Morosetti, Rosita Giampieretti, Rossana Lorenzetti, Marinella Baroni
INTRODUCTION: This study compared percutaneous tibial nerve stimulation (PTNS) versus electrical stimulation with pelvic floor muscle training (ES + PFMT) in women with overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). MATERIALS AND METHODS: 60 women with OAB were enrolled. Patients were randomized into two groups. In group A, women underwent ES with PFMT, in group B women underwent PTNS. RESULTS: A statistically significant reduction in the number of daily micturitions, episodes of nocturia and urge incontinence was found in the two groups but the difference was more substantial in women treated with PTNS; voided volume increased in both groups...
January 2017: International Braz J Urol: Official Journal of the Brazilian Society of Urology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28124522/female-urinary-incontinence-and-sexuality
#19
Renato Lains Mota
Urinary incontinence is a common problem among women and it is estimated that between 15 and 55% of them complain of lower urinary symptoms. The most prevalent form of urinary incontinence is associated with stress, followed by mixed urinary incontinence and urge urinary incontinence. It is a symptom with several effects on quality of life of women mainly in their social, familiar and sexual domains. Female reproductive and urinary systems share anatomical structures, which promotes that urinary problems interfere with sexual function in females...
January 2017: International Braz J Urol: Official Journal of the Brazilian Society of Urology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28122608/opportunities-challenges-and-concerns-for-the-implementation-and-uptake-of-pelvic-floor-muscle-assessment-and-exercises-during-the-childbearing-years-protocol-for-a-critical-interpretive-synthesis
#20
Victoria E Salmon, E Jean C Hay-Smith, Rachel Jarvie, Sarah Dean, Eivor Oborn, Susan E Bayliss, Debra Bick, Clare Davenport, Khaled M Ismail, Christine MacArthur, Mark Pearson
BACKGROUND: Pregnancy and childbirth are important risk factors for urinary incontinence (UI) in women. Pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME) are effective for prevention of UI. Guidelines for the management of UI recommend offering pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) to women during their first pregnancy as a preventive strategy. The objective of this review is to understand the relationships between individual, professional, inter-professional and organisational opportunities, challenges and concerns that could be essential to maximise the impact of PFMT during childbearing years and to effect the required behaviour change...
January 25, 2017: Systematic Reviews
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