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Pelvic floor muscle training

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28738443/urethral-injection-therapy-for-urinary-incontinence-in-women
#1
REVIEW
Vivienne Kirchin, Tobias Page, Phil E Keegan, Kofi Om Atiemo, June D Cody, Samuel McClinton, Patricia Aluko
BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence imposes a significant health and economic burden to society. Periurethral or transurethral injection of bulking agents is a minimally invasive surgical procedure used as one the surgical treatments of stress urinary incontinence (SUI) in adult women. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of periurethral or transurethral injection therapy on the cure or improvement of urinary incontinence in women. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register (searched 8 November 2010) and the reference lists of relevant articles...
July 25, 2017: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28723370/evaluation-and-management-of-postprostatectomy-incontinence-a-systematic-review-of-current-literature
#2
REVIEW
Alexander Kretschmer, Wilhelm Hübner, Jaspreet S Sandhu, Ricarda M Bauer
CONTEXT: Radical prostatectomy is the most common reason for male stress urinary incontinence. There is still uncertainty about its diagnostic and therapeutic management. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate current evidence regarding the diagnosis and therapy of postprostatectomy incontinence (PPI). EVIDENCE ACQUISITION: A systematic review of the literature was performed in October 2015 using the Medline database. EVIDENCE SYNTHESIS: Diagnosis and conservative treatment of PPI are currently mostly based on expert opinions...
August 2016: European Urology Focus
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28718223/self-management-of-stress-urinary-incontinence-via-a-mobile-app-2-year-follow-up-of-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#3
Victoria Hoffman, Lars Söderström, Eva Samuelsson
We investigated the long-term effects of using a mobile app to treat stress urinary incontinence with a focus on pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) MATERIAL AND METHODS: A previous randomized controlled trial of 123 women aged 27-72 years found that 3 months of self-managing stress urinary incontinence with support from the Tät(®) app was effective. We followed-up the women in the app group (n=62) two years after the initial trial with the same primary outcomes for symptom severity (International Consultation on Incontinence Questionnaire Short Form [ICIQ-UI SF]) and condition-specific quality of life (ICIQ-Lower Urinary Tract Symptom Quality of Life [ICIQ-LUTSqol]) and compared the scores with those at baseline RESULTS: Of the 62 women, 61 and 46 (75...
July 17, 2017: Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28681849/urinary-incontinence-in-women
#4
REVIEW
Yoshitaka Aoki, Heidi W Brown, Linda Brubaker, Jean Nicolas Cornu, J Oliver Daly, Rufus Cartwright
Urinary incontinence symptoms are highly prevalent among women, have a substantial effect on health-related quality of life and are associated with considerable personal and societal expenditure. Two main types are described: stress urinary incontinence, in which urine leaks in association with physical exertion, and urgency urinary incontinence, in which urine leaks in association with a sudden compelling desire to void. Women who experience both symptoms are considered as having mixed urinary incontinence...
July 6, 2017: Nature Reviews. Disease Primers
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28676366/physical-therapy-treatment-of-pelvic-pain
#5
REVIEW
Michelle H Bradley, Ashley Rawlins, C Anna Brinker
Physical therapists offer a valuable service in the treatment of chronic pelvic pain (CPP). Physical therapists are trained in functional restoration of the whole body. The physical therapist is in the unique position to assess and treat CPP in restoration of transitional movement ease and tolerance for improved functional control with the ultimate goal of wellness. It is imperative that pelvic floor muscle overactivity, underactivity, or a combination there of is accurately assessed and treated to avoid exacerbation of symptoms...
August 2017: Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28624919/physical-activity-and-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-in-patients-with-pelvic-organ-prolapse-a-pilot-study
#6
Mifuka Ouchi, Kumiko Kato, Momokazu Gotoh, Shigeyuki Suzuki
INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: The details of the physical activity in patients with mild to moderate pelvic organ prolapse (Pmoderate pelvic organ prolapse (POP) remain under-studied. The purpose of the present study was to investigate objective physical activity levels and the changes in pelvic floor muscle(PFM) strength, symptoms and quality of life (QOL) between before and after PFM training (PFMT) in patients with POP. METHODS: In a prospective pilot study, 29 patients with stage II or III POP completed approximately 16 weeks of PFMT...
June 17, 2017: International Urogynecology Journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28602038/a-meta-analysis-of-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-for-the-treatment-of-urinary-incontinence
#7
REVIEW
Xiao-Fei Nie, Yan-Qiong Ouyang, Lan Wang, Sharon R Redding
BACKGROUND: Symptoms associated with urinary incontinence (UI) frequently affect quality of life. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) among women with UI. SEARCH STRATEGY: The Cochrane Library, PubMed, and Web of Science databases were searched using relevant terms for all English-language studies published up to August 15, 2016. SELECTION CRITERIA: Studies that evaluated the effects of PFMT on UI symptoms, PFM function, and quality of life were included...
June 11, 2017: International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28600995/high-spatial-resolution-pressure-distribution-of-the-vaginal-canal-in-pompoir-practitioners-a-biomechanical-approach-for-assessing-the-pelvic-floor
#8
Licia P Cacciari, Anice C Pássaro, Amanda C Amorim, Isabel C N Sacco
BACKGROUND: Pompoir is a technique poorly studied in the literature that claims to improve pelvic floor strength and coordination. This study aims to investigate the pelvic floor muscles' coordination throughout the vaginal canal among Pompoir practitioners and non-practitioners by describing a high resolution map of pressure distribution. METHODS: This cross-sectional, study included 40 healthy women in two groups: control and Pompoir. While these women performed both sustained and "waveform" pelvic floor muscle contractions, the spatiotemporal pressure distribution in their vaginal canals was evaluated by a non-deformable probe fully instrumented with a 10×10 matrix of capacitive transducers...
June 1, 2017: Clinical Biomechanics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28556806/quality-of-life-in-women-with-stage-1-stress-urinary-incontinence-after-application-of-conservative-treatment-a-randomized-trial
#9
Magdalena Ptak, Agnieszka Brodowska, Sylwester Ciećwież, Iwona Rotter
Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) influences quality of life in female patients. In this study, we used ICIQ LUTS QoL (The International Consultation Incontinence Questionnaire Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms quality of life) to determine the quality of life (QoL) in various domains in patients with stage 1 SUI. The study included 140 perimenopausal women subjected to urodynamic tests at the Department of Gynaecology, Endocrinology and Gynaecologic Oncology, Pomeranian Medical University, Police (Poland) in 2013-2015...
May 30, 2017: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28542276/effect-of-combined-actions-of-hip-adduction-abduction-on-the-force-generation-and-maintenance-of-pelvic-floor-muscles-in-healthy-women
#10
Amanda C Amorim, Licia P Cacciari, Anice C Passaro, Simone R B Silveira, Cesar F Amorim, Jefferson F Loss, Isabel C N Sacco
Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) force and coordination are related to urinary incontinence severity and to sexual satisfaction. Health professionals frequently combine classic PFM exercises with hip adduction/abduction contraction to treat these disorders, but the real benefits of this practice are still unknown. Based on a theoretical anatomy approach whereby the levator ani muscle is inserted into the obturator internus myofascia and in which force generated by hip movements should increase the contraction quality of PFMs, our aim was to investigate the effects of isometric hip adduction and abduction on PFM force generation...
2017: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28508398/effect-of-electromyographic-biofeedback-as-an-add-on-to-pelvic-floor-muscle-exercises-on-neuromuscular-outcomes-and-quality-of-life-in-postmenopausal-women-with-stress-urinary-incontinence-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#11
Adriane Bertotto, Renata Schvartzman, Silvana Uchôa, Maria Celeste Osório Wender
AIMS: To compare the efficacy of pelvic floor muscle exercises (PFME) with and without electromyographic biofeedback (BF) in increasing muscle strength, improving myoelectric activity, and improving pre-contraction and quality of life in postmenopausal women with stress urinary incontinence. METHODS: Randomized controlled trial of 49 postmenopausal women with stress urinary incontinence. Participants were allocated across three groups: control, PFME alone, and PFME + BF...
May 16, 2017: Neurourology and Urodynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28499536/recognizing-and-managing-common-urogynecologic-disorders
#12
REVIEW
Denise M Elser
Many women experience urogynecologic or pelvic floor disorders, especially urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. The obstetrician/gynecologist is often the first health care professional to evaluate and treat these disorders. Treatments include pelvic floor muscle training, behavioral therapies, oral medications, neuromodulation, intradetrusor medications, and surgery. When approaching the woman with symptomatic prolapse, familiarity with pessaries and various surgical procedures aid in counseling...
June 2017: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28499001/is-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-a-physical-therapy-or-a-behavioral-therapy-a-call-to-name-and-report-the-physical-cognitive-and-behavioral-elements
#13
Helena C Frawley, Sarah G Dean, Susan C Slade, E Jean C Hay-Smith
This perspective article explores whether pelvic-floor muscle training (PFMT) for the management of female urinary incontinence and prolapse is a physical therapy or a behavioral therapy. The primary aim is to demonstrate that it is both. A secondary aim is to show that the plethora of terms used for PFMT is potentially confusing and that current terminology inadequately represents the full intent, content, and delivery of this complex intervention. While physical therapists may be familiar with exercise terms, the details are often incompletely reported; furthermore, physical therapists are less familiar with the terminology used in accurately representing cognitive and behavioral therapy interventions, which results in these elements being even less well reported...
April 1, 2017: Physical Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28483745/mobile-app-for-treatment-of-stress-urinary-incontinence-a-cost-effectiveness-analysis
#14
Malin Sjöström, Lars Lindholm, Eva Samuelsson
BACKGROUND: Mobile apps can increase access to care, facilitate self-management, and improve adherence to treatment. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) affects 10-35% of women and, currently, an app with instructions for pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) is available as first-line treatment. A previous randomized controlled study demonstrated that the app benefitted symptom severity and quality of life (QoL); in this study we investigate the cost-effectiveness of the app. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the health economy of the app for treating SUI...
May 8, 2017: Journal of Medical Internet Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464434/the-effects-of-pilates-method-on-pelvic-floor-muscle-strength-in-patients-with-post-prostatectomy-urinary-incontinence-a-randomized-clinical-trial
#15
Cíntia S Gomes, Fabiana R Pedriali, Mariana R Urbano, Eliane H Moreira, Marcio A Averbeck, Silvio Henrique M Almeida
AIMS: To assess the effects of a Pilates exercise program compared to conventional pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) protocol on pelvic floor muscle strength (PFMS) in patients with post-prostatectomy urinary incontinence. METHODS: Patients were randomized into three treatment groups (G1: Pilates, G2: electrical stimulation combined with PFMT, and G3: control group). Duration of therapy was 10 weeks. Baseline assessment included the 24 h pad-test and the ICI-Q questionnaire...
May 2, 2017: Neurourology and Urodynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464426/structured-behavioral-treatment-research-protocol-for-women-with-mixed-urinary-incontinence-and-overactive-bladder-symptoms
#16
REVIEW
Diane K Newman, Diane Borello-France, Vivian W Sung
AIMS: The primary aim is to provide detailed rationale and methodology for the development and implementation of a perioperative behavioral/pelvic floor exercise research protocol for women who self-chose surgical intervention and who may or may not have been offered behavioral treatments initially. This protocol is part of the ESTEEM trial (Effects of Surgical Treatment Enhanced with Exercise for Mixed Urinary Incontinence Trial) which was designed to determine the effect of a combined surgical and perioperative behavioral/pelvic floor exercise intervention versus surgery alone on improving mixed urinary incontinence (MUI) and overactive bladder (OAB) symptoms...
May 2, 2017: Neurourology and Urodynamics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28451797/-repetitive-peripheral-muscle-stimulation-vs-pelvic-floor-muscle-training-comparison-of-two-approaches-to-incontinence-treatment
#17
Sabine Schrank, Laura Adlbrecht, Hanna Mayer
BACKGROUND: Although there are various measures for the prevention, treatment, and management of urinary incontinence (UI), absorbing aids (and only scant continence-promoting measures) are primarily used in nursing homes in Austria. Repetitive peripheral muscle stimulation (RPMS) is already used as a common method for the treatment and prevention of incontinence in the outpatient setting and is an effective alternative compared to the usual incontinence treatments. However, there are no empirical data as yet on the effect of RPMS in nursing home residents...
April 27, 2017: Zeitschrift Für Gerontologie und Geriatrie
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28443787/ultrasound-based-motor-control-training-for-the-pelvic-floor-pre-and-post-prostatectomy-scoring-reliability-and-skill-acquisition
#18
Stuart Doorbar-Baptist, Roger Adams, Trudy Rebbeck
AIM: This study documents a protocol designed to evaluate pelvic floor motor control in men with prostate cancer. It also aims to evaluate the reliability of therapists in rating motor control of pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) using real time ultrasound imaging (RUSI) video clips. We further determine predictors of acquiring motor control. METHODS: Ninety-one men diagnosed with prostate cancer attending a physiotherapy clinic for pelvic floor exercises were taught detailed pelvic floor motor control exercises by a physiotherapist using trans-abdominal RUSI for biofeedback...
April 2017: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28339839/recent-advances-in-understanding-pelvic-floor-tissue-of-women-with-and-without-pelvic-organ-prolapse-considerations-for-physical-therapists
#19
Kimberly Saunders
Pelvic organ prolapse is a fairly common condition that imposes significant symptoms, diminished quality of life, social burden, financial expense, and surgical risk on women. As evidence supporting the benefit of pelvic-floor muscle training in nonsurgical management of pelvic organ prolapse grows, physical therapists are becoming a provider of choice interacting with women affected by pelvic organ prolapse. This perspective article will review recent research on tissue characteristics of 3 key components of pelvic organ support: skeletal muscle, ligament, and vaginal wall...
April 1, 2017: Physical Therapy
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28335792/can-incontinence-be-cured-a-systematic-review-of-cure-rates
#20
REVIEW
Rob Riemsma, Suzanne Hagen, Ruth Kirschner-Hermanns, Christine Norton, Helle Wijk, Karl-Erik Andersson, Christopher Chapple, Julian Spinks, Adrian Wagg, Edward Hutt, Kate Misso, Sohan Deshpande, Jos Kleijnen, Ian Milsom
BACKGROUND: Incontinence constitutes a major health problem affecting millions of people worldwide. The present study aims to assess cure rates from treating urinary (UI) or fecal incontinence (FI) and the number of people who may remain dependent on containment strategies. METHODS: Medline, Embase, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), CINAHL, and PEDro were searched from January 2005 to June 2015. Supplementary searches included conference abstracts and trials registers (2013-2015)...
March 24, 2017: BMC Medicine
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