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speech signal processing

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27913315/speech-enhancement-based-on-neural-networks-improves-speech-intelligibility-in-noise-for-cochlear-implant-users
#1
Tobias Goehring, Federico Bolner, Jessica J M Monaghan, Bas van Dijk, Andrzej Zarowski, Stefan Bleeck
Speech understanding in noisy environments is still one of the major challenges for cochlear implant (CI) users in everyday life. We evaluated a speech enhancement algorithm based on neural networks (NNSE) for improving speech intelligibility in noise for CI users. The algorithm decomposes the noisy speech signal into time-frequency units, extracts a set of auditory-inspired features and feeds them to the neural network to produce an estimation of which frequency channels contain more perceptually important information (higher signal-to-noise ratio, SNR)...
November 29, 2016: Hearing Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27908047/assessing-the-perceptual-contributions-of-level-dependent-segments-to-sentence-intelligibility
#2
Tian Guan, Guang-Xing Chu, Yu Tsao, Fei Chen
The present work assessed the contributions of high root-mean-square (RMS) level (H-level, containing primarily vowels) and middle-RMS-level (M-level, with mostly consonants and vowel-consonant transitions) segments to the intelligibility of noise-masked and noise-suppressed sentences. In experiment 1, noise-masked (by speech-spectrum shaped noise and 6-talker babble) Mandarin sentences were edited to preserve only H- or M-level segments, while replacing the non-target segments with silence. In experiment 2, Mandarin sentences were subjected to four commonly-used single-channel noise-suppression algorithms before generating H-level-only and M-level-only noise-suppressed sentences...
November 2016: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27904958/feasibility-of-an-implanted-microphone-for-cochlear-implant-listening
#3
Jean-Marc Gérard, Laurent Demanez, Caroline Salmon, Filiep Vanpoucke, Joris Walraevens, Anke Plasmans, Daniele De Siati, Philippe Lefèbvre
This study aimed at evaluating the feasibility of an implanted microphone for cochlear implants (CI) by comparison of hearing outcomes, sound quality and patient satisfaction of a subcutaneous microphone to a standard external microphone of a behind-the-ear sound processor. In this prospective feasibility study with a within-subject repeated measures design comparing the microphone modalities, ten experienced adult unilateral CI users received an implantable contralateral subcutaneous microphone attached to a percutaneous plug...
November 30, 2016: European Archives of Oto-rhino-laryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27894891/source-analysis-of-auditory-steady-state-responses-in-acoustic-and-electric-hearing
#4
Robert Luke, Astrid De Vos, Jan Wouters
Speech is a complex signal containing a broad variety of acoustic information. For accurate speech reception, the listener must perceive modulations over a range of envelope frequencies. Perception of these modulations is particularly important for cochlear implant (CI) users, as all commercial devices use envelope coding strategies. Prolonged deafness affects the auditory pathway. However, little is known of how cochlear implantation affects the neural processing of modulated stimuli. This study investigates and contrasts the neural processing of envelope rate modulated signals in acoustic and CI listeners...
November 25, 2016: NeuroImage
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27894376/brain-substrates-underlying-auditory-speech-priming-in-healthy-listeners-and-listeners-with-schizophrenia
#5
C Wu, Y Zheng, J Li, H Wu, S She, S Liu, Y Ning, L Li
BACKGROUND: Under 'cocktail party' listening conditions, healthy listeners and listeners with schizophrenia can use temporally pre-presented auditory speech-priming (ASP) stimuli to improve target-speech recognition, even though listeners with schizophrenia are more vulnerable to informational speech masking. METHOD: Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, this study searched for both brain substrates underlying the unmasking effect of ASP in 16 healthy controls and 22 patients with schizophrenia, and brain substrates underlying schizophrenia-related speech-recognition deficits under speech-masking conditions...
November 29, 2016: Psychological Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27891665/spectral-summation-and-facilitation-in-on-and-off-responses-for-optimized-representation-of-communication-calls-in-mouse-inferior-colliculus
#6
Alexander G Akimov, Marina A Egorova, Günter Ehret
Selectivity for processing of species-specific vocalizations and communication sounds has often been associated with the auditory cortex. The midbrain inferior colliculus, however, is the first center in the auditory pathways of mammals integrating acoustic information processed in separate nuclei and channels in the brainstem and, therefore, could significantly contribute to enhance the perception of species' communication sounds. Here, we used natural wriggling calls of mouse pups, which communicate need for maternal care to adult females, and further 15 synthesized sounds to test the hypothesis that neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus of adult females optimize their response rates for reproduction of the three main harmonics (formants) of wriggling calls...
November 27, 2016: European Journal of Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27885978/factors-affecting-daily-cochlear-implant-use-in-children-datalogging-evidence
#7
Vijayalakshmi Easwar, Joseph Sanfilippo, Blake Papsin, Karen Gordon
BACKGROUND: Children with profound hearing loss can gain access to sound through cochlear implants (CIs), but these devices must be worn consistently to promote auditory development. Although subjective parent reports have identified several factors limiting long-term CI use in children, it is also important to understand the day-to-day issues which may preclude consistent device use. In the present study, objective measures gathered through datalogging software were used to quantify the following in children: (1) number of hours of CI use per day, (2) practical concerns including repeated disconnections between the external transmission coil and the internal device (termed "coil-offs"), and (3) listening environments experienced during daily use...
November 2016: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27884866/a-case-of-specific-language-impairment-in-a-deaf-signer-of-american-sign-language
#8
David Quinto-Pozos, Jenny L Singleton, Peter C Hauser
This article describes the case of a deaf native signer of American Sign Language (ASL) with a specific language impairment (SLI). School records documented normal cognitive development but atypical language development. Data include school records; interviews with the child, his mother, and school professionals; ASL and English evaluations; and a comprehensive neuropsychological and psychoeducational evaluation, and they span an approximate period of 7.5 years (11;10-19;6) including scores from school records (11;10-16;5) and a 3...
November 23, 2016: Journal of Deaf Studies and Deaf Education
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27877144/rhythm-on-your-lips
#9
Marcela Peña, Alan Langus, César Gutiérrez, Daniela Huepe-Artigas, Marina Nespor
The Iambic-Trochaic Law (ITL) accounts for speech rhythm, grouping of sounds as either Iambs-if alternating in duration-or Trochees-if alternating in pitch and/or intensity. The two different rhythms signal word order, one of the basic syntactic properties of language. We investigated the extent to which Iambic and Trochaic phrases could be auditorily and visually recognized, when visual stimuli engage lip reading. Our results show both rhythmic patterns were recognized from both, auditory and visual stimuli, suggesting that speech rhythm has a multimodal representation...
2016: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27875590/spatio-temporal-progression-of-cortical-activity-related-to-continuous-overt-and-covert-speech-production-in-a-reading-task
#10
Jonathan S Brumberg, Dean J Krusienski, Shreya Chakrabarti, Aysegul Gunduz, Peter Brunner, Anthony L Ritaccio, Gerwin Schalk
How the human brain plans, executes, and monitors continuous and fluent speech has remained largely elusive. For example, previous research has defined the cortical locations most important for different aspects of speech function, but has not yet yielded a definition of the temporal progression of involvement of those locations as speech progresses either overtly or covertly. In this paper, we uncovered the spatio-temporal evolution of neuronal population-level activity related to continuous overt speech, and identified those locations that shared activity characteristics across overt and covert speech...
2016: PloS One
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27866186/consequences-of-stimulus-type-on-higher-order-processing-in-single-sided-deaf-cochlear-implant-users
#11
Mareike Finke, Pascale Sandmann, Hanna Bönitz, Andrej Kral, Andreas Büchner
Single-sided deaf subjects with a cochlear implant (CI) provide the unique opportunity to compare central auditory processing of the electrical input (CI ear) and the acoustic input (normal-hearing, NH, ear) within the same individual. In these individuals, sensory processing differs between their two ears, while cognitive abilities are the same irrespectively of the sensory input. To better understand perceptual-cognitive factors modulating speech intelligibility with a CI, this electroencephalography study examined the central-auditory processing of words, the cognitive abilities, and the speech intelligibility in 10 postlingually single-sided deaf CI users...
November 19, 2016: Audiology & Neuro-otology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27859274/configurations-of-time-the-body-and-verbal-communication-temporality-in-patients-who-express-their-suffering-through-the-body
#12
José Eduardo Fischbein
This paper focuses on the study of temporality used as a clinical pointer to processes of affect regulation in patients who express their suffering through a discourse driven by bodily allusions. Differences between symptoms revealed by body language that conveys an experience of conflict (psychoneurotic symptoms) and somatizations are reviewed. Somatization is examined as a benchmark for the failure to resolve states of tension. The body in the session is conceptualized as a speech event. The body is considered as a psychical construction organized in the exchanges with a fellow human-being...
November 17, 2016: International Journal of Psycho-analysis
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27852514/adult-like-processing-of-time-compressed-speech-by-newborns-a-nirs-study
#13
Cécile Issard, Judit Gervain
Humans can adapt to a wide range of variations in the speech signal, maintaining an invariant representation of the linguistic information it contains. Among them, adaptation to rapid or time-compressed speech has been well studied in adults, but the developmental origin of this capacity remains unknown. Does this ability depend on experience with speech (if yes, as heard in utero or as heard postnatally), with sounds in general or is it experience-independent? Using near-infrared spectroscopy, we show that the newborn brain can discriminate between three different compression rates: normal, i...
October 29, 2016: Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27848281/processing-emotions-in-sounds-cross-domain-aftereffects-of-vocal-utterances-and-musical-sounds
#14
Casady Bowman, Takashi Yamauchi
Nonlinguistic signals in the voice and musical instruments play a critical role in communicating emotion. Although previous research suggests a common mechanism for emotion processing in music and speech, the precise relationship between the two domains is unclear due to the paucity of direct evidence. By applying the adaptation paradigm developed by Bestelmeyer, Rouger, DeBruine, and Belin [2010. Auditory adaptation in vocal affect perception. Cognition, 117(2), 217-223. doi: 10.1016/j.cognition.2010.08.008 ], this study shows cross-domain aftereffects from vocal to musical sounds...
November 16, 2016: Cognition & Emotion
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27846209/prediction-errors-but-not-sharpened-signals-simulate-multivoxel-fmri-patterns-during-speech-perception
#15
Helen Blank, Matthew H Davis
Successful perception depends on combining sensory input with prior knowledge. However, the underlying mechanism by which these two sources of information are combined is unknown. In speech perception, as in other domains, two functionally distinct coding schemes have been proposed for how expectations influence representation of sensory evidence. Traditional models suggest that expected features of the speech input are enhanced or sharpened via interactive activation (Sharpened Signals). Conversely, Predictive Coding suggests that expected features are suppressed so that unexpected features of the speech input (Prediction Errors) are processed further...
November 2016: PLoS Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27826235/acoustic-detail-but-not-predictability-of-task-irrelevant-speech-disrupts-working-memory
#16
Malte Wöstmann, Jonas Obleser
Attended speech is comprehended better not only if more acoustic detail is available, but also if it is semantically highly predictable. But can more acoustic detail or higher predictability turn into disadvantages and distract a listener if the speech signal is to be ignored? Also, does the degree of distraction increase for older listeners who typically show a decline in attentional control ability? Adopting the irrelevant-speech paradigm, we tested whether younger (age 23-33 years) and older (60-78 years) listeners' working memory for the serial order of spoken digits would be disrupted by the presentation of task-irrelevant speech varying in its acoustic detail (using noise-vocoding) and its semantic predictability (of sentence endings)...
2016: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27817761/words-are-not-enough-how-preschoolers-integration-of-perspective-and-emotion-informs-their-referential-understanding
#17
Susan A Graham, Valerie San Juan, Melanie Khu
When linguistic information alone does not clarify a speaker's intended meaning, skilled communicators can draw on a variety of cues to infer communicative intent. In this paper, we review research examining the developmental emergence of preschoolers' sensitivity to a communicative partner's perspective. We focus particularly on preschoolers' tendency to use cues both within the communicative context (i.e. a speaker's visual access to information) and within the speech signal itself (i.e. emotional prosody) to make on-line inferences about communicative intent...
November 7, 2016: Journal of Child Language
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27809627/avoiding-disconnection-an-evaluation-of-telephone-options-for-cochlear-implant-users
#18
Steven C Marcrum, Erin M Picou, Thomas Steffens
OBJECTIVE: The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of coupling method on telephone-based speech recognition and perceived listening difficulty in noise for cochlear implant (CI) users. A secondary aim was to evaluate potential impacts of additional processing modifications within coupling conditions, such as activating noise reducing algorithms or muting environmental microphones. DESIGN: Hochmair-Schulz-Moser sentences were bandpass-filtered (300-3400 Hz) and presented unilaterally either via telephone handset or advanced wireless streaming device in a background of cafeteria babble (signal-to-noise ratio =15 dB)...
November 4, 2016: International Journal of Audiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27801867/towards-contactless-silent-speech-recognition-based-on-detection-of-active-and-visible-articulators-using-ir-uwb-radar
#19
Young Hoon Shin, Jiwon Seo
People with hearing or speaking disabilities are deprived of the benefits of conventional speech recognition technology because it is based on acoustic signals. Recent research has focused on silent speech recognition systems that are based on the motions of a speaker's vocal tract and articulators. Because most silent speech recognition systems use contact sensors that are very inconvenient to users or optical systems that are susceptible to environmental interference, a contactless and robust solution is hence required...
October 29, 2016: Sensors
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27798133/involvement-of-the-serotonin-transporter-gene-in-accurate-subcortical-speech-encoding
#20
Lenka Selinger, Katarzyna Zarnowiec, Marc Via, Immaculada C Clemente, Carles Escera
: A flourishing line of evidence has highlighted the encoding of speech sounds in the subcortical auditory system as being shaped by acoustic, linguistic, and musical experience and training. And while the heritability of auditory speech as well as nonspeech processing has been suggested, the genetic determinants of subcortical speech processing have not yet been uncovered. Here, we postulated that the serotonin transporter-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR), a common functional polymorphism located in the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (SLC6A4), is implicated in speech encoding in the human subcortical auditory pathway...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Neuroscience: the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
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