keyword
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Vowel perception

keyword
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28471206/the-complementary-roles-of-auditory-and-motor-information-evaluated-in-a-bayesian-perceptuo-motor-model-of-speech-perception
#1
Raphaël Laurent, Marie-Lou Barnaud, Jean-Luc Schwartz, Pierre Bessière, Julien Diard
There is a consensus concerning the view that both auditory and motor representations intervene in the perceptual processing of speech units. However, the question of the functional role of each of these systems remains seldom addressed and poorly understood. We capitalized on the formal framework of Bayesian Programming to develop COSMO (Communicating Objects using Sensory-Motor Operations), an integrative model that allows principled comparisons of purely motor or purely auditory implementations of a speech perception task and tests the gain of efficiency provided by their Bayesian fusion...
May 4, 2017: Psychological Review
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464681/sensorimotor-adaptation-affects-perceptual-compensation-for-coarticulation
#2
William L Schuerman, Srikantan Nagarajan, James M McQueen, John Houde
A given speech sound will be realized differently depending on the context in which it is produced. Listeners have been found to compensate perceptually for these coarticulatory effects, yet it is unclear to what extent this effect depends on actual production experience. In this study, whether changes in motor-to-sound mappings induced by adaptation to altered auditory feedback can affect perceptual compensation for coarticulation is investigated. Specifically, whether altering how the vowel [i] is produced can affect the categorization of a stimulus continuum between an alveolar and a palatal fricative whose interpretation is dependent on vocalic context is tested...
April 2017: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464659/modulation-of-auditory-motor-learning-in-response-to-formant-perturbation-as-a-function-of-delayed-auditory-feedback
#3
Takashi Mitsuya, Kevin G Munhall, David W Purcell
The interaction of language production and perception has been substantiated by empirical studies where speakers compensate their speech articulation in response to the manipulated sound of their voice heard in real-time as auditory feedback. A recent study by Max and Maffett [(2015). Neurosci. Lett. 591, 25-29] reported an absence of compensation (i.e., auditory-motor learning) for frequency-shifted formants when auditory feedback was delayed by 100 ms. In the present study, the effect of auditory feedback delay was studied when only the first formant was manipulated while delaying auditory feedback systematically...
April 2017: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28464636/directional-asymmetries-reveal-a-universal-bias-in-adult-vowel-perception
#4
Matthew Masapollo, Linda Polka, Monika Molnar, Lucie Ménard
Research on cross-language vowel perception in both infants and adults has shown that for many vowel contrasts, discrimination is easier when the same pair of vowels is presented in one direction compared to the reverse direction. According to one account, these directional asymmetries reflect a universal bias favoring "focal" vowels (i.e., vowels whose adjacent formants are close in frequency, which concentrates acoustic energy into a narrower spectral region). An alternative, but not mutually exclusive, account is that such effects reflect an experience-dependent bias favoring prototypical instances of native-language vowel categories...
April 2017: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28443053/perceptual-improvement-of-lexical-tones-in-infants-effects-of-tone-language-experience
#5
Feng-Ming Tsao
To learn words in a tonal language, tone-language learners should not only develop better abilities for perceiving consonants and vowels, but also for lexical tones. The divergent trend of enhancing sensitivity to native phonetic contrasts and reduced sensitivity to non-native phonetic contrast is theoretically essential to evaluate effects of listening to an ambient language on speech perception development. The loss of sensitivity in discriminating lexical tones among non-tonal language-learning infants was apparent between 6 and 12 months of age, but only few studies examined trends of differentiating native lexical tones in infancy...
2017: Frontiers in Psychology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28441570/neural-indices-of-phonemic-discrimination-and-sentence-level-speech-intelligibility-in-quiet-and-noise-a-p3-study
#6
Tess K Koerner, Yang Zhang, Peggy B Nelson, Boxiang Wang, Hui Zou
This study examined how speech babble noise differentially affected the auditory P3 responses and the associated neural oscillatory activities for consonant and vowel discrimination in relation to segmental- and sentence-level speech perception in noise. The data were collected from 16 normal-hearing participants in a double-oddball paradigm that contained a consonant (/ba/ to /da/) and vowel (/ba/ to /bu/) change in quiet and noise (speech-babble background at a -3 dB signal-to-noise ratio) conditions. Time-frequency analysis was applied to obtain inter-trial phase coherence (ITPC) and event-related spectral perturbation (ERSP) measures in delta, theta, and alpha frequency bands for the P3 response...
April 18, 2017: Hearing Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28439232/mapping-the-speech-code-cortical-responses-linking-the-perception-and-production-of-vowels
#7
William L Schuerman, Antje S Meyer, James M McQueen
The acoustic realization of speech is constrained by the physical mechanisms by which it is produced. Yet for speech perception, the degree to which listeners utilize experience derived from speech production has long been debated. In the present study, we examined how sensorimotor adaptation during production may affect perception, and how this relationship may be reflected in early vs. late electrophysiological responses. Participants first performed a baseline speech production task, followed by a vowel categorization task during which EEG responses were recorded...
2017: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28395548/incorporating-ceiling-effects-during-analysis-of-speech-perception-data-from-a-paediatric-cochlear-implant-cohort
#8
Hanneke Bruijnzeel, Guido Cattani, Inge Stegeman, Vedat Topsakal, Wilko Grolman
OBJECTIVE: To compare speech perception between children with a different age at cochlear implantation. DESIGN: We evaluated speech perception by comparing consonant-vowel-consonant (auditory) (CVC(A)) scores at five-year follow-up of children implanted between 1997 and 2010. The proportion of children from each age-at-implantation group reaching the 95%CI of CVC(A) ceiling scores (>95%) was calculated to identify speech perception differences masked by ceiling effects...
April 10, 2017: International Journal of Audiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28382120/outcomes-of-late-implantation-in-usher-syndrome-patients
#9
Ana Cristina H Hoshino, Agustina Echegoyen, Maria Valéria Schmidt Goffi-Gomez, Robinson Koji Tsuji, Ricardo Ferreira Bento
Introduction Usher syndrome (US) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by hearing loss and progressive visual impairment. Some deaf Usher syndrome patients learn to communicate using sign language. During adolescence, as they start losing vision, they are usually referred to cochlear implantation as a salvage for their new condition. Is a late implantation beneficial to these children? Objective The objective of this study is to describe the outcomes of US patients who received cochlear implants at a later age...
April 2017: International Archives of Otorhinolaryngology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28372061/seeing-closing-gesture-of-articulators-affects-speech-perception-of-geminate-consonants
#10
Takayuki Arai, Eri Iwagami, Emi Yanagisawa
This study tests the perception of geminate consonants for native speakers of Japanese using audio and visual information. A previous study showed that formant transitions associated with the closing gesture of articulators at the end of a preceding vowel are crucial for perception of stop geminate consonants in Japanese. In addition, this study further focuses on visual cues, to test if seeing the closing gesture affects perception of geminate consonants. Based on a perceptual experiment, it is observed that visual information can compensate for a deficiency in geminate consonant auditory information, such as formant transitions...
March 2017: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28372055/assessing-the-efficacy-of-hearing-aid-amplification-using-a-phoneme-test
#11
Christoph Scheidiger, Jont B Allen, Torsten Dau
Consonant-vowel (CV) perception experiments provide valuable insights into how humans process speech. Here, two CV identification experiments were conducted in a group of hearing-impaired (HI) listeners, using 14 consonants followed by the vowel /ɑ/. The CVs were presented in quiet and with added speech-shaped noise at signal-to-noise ratios of 0, 6, and 12 dB. The HI listeners were provided with two different amplification schemes for the CVs. In the first experiment, a frequency-independent amplification (flat-gain) was provided and the CVs were presented at the most-comfortable loudness level...
March 2017: Journal of the Acoustical Society of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28362674/human-frequency-following-responses-to-vocoded-speech
#12
Saradha Ananthakrishnan, Xin Luo, Ananthanarayan Krishnan
OBJECTIVES: Vocoders offer an effective platform to simulate the effects of cochlear implant speech processing strategies in normal-hearing listeners. Several behavioral studies have examined the effects of varying spectral and temporal cues on vocoded speech perception; however, little is known about the neural indices of vocoded speech perception. Here, the scalp-recorded frequency following response (FFR) was used to study the effects of varying spectral and temporal cues on brainstem neural representation of specific acoustic cues, the temporal envelope periodicity related to fundamental frequency (F0) and temporal fine structure (TFS) related to formant and formant-related frequencies, as reflected in the phase-locked neural activity in response to vocoded speech...
March 30, 2017: Ear and Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28353522/effects-of-simulated-hearing-loss-on-bilingual-children-s-consonant-recognition-in-noise
#13
Kanae Nishi, Andrea C Trevino, Lydia Rosado Rogers, Paula García, Stephen T Neely
OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the possible impact of simulated hearing loss on speech perception in Spanish-English bilingual children. To avoid confound between individual differences in hearing-loss configuration and linguistic experience, threshold-elevating noise simulating a mild-to-moderate sloping hearing loss was used with normal-hearing listeners. The hypotheses were that: (1) bilingual children can perform similarly to English-speaking monolingual peers in quiet; (2) for both bilingual and monolingual children, noise and simulated hearing loss would have detrimental impacts consistent with their acoustic characteristics (i...
March 28, 2017: Ear and Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28338496/infants-and-adults-use-of-temporal-cues-in-consonant-discrimination
#14
Laurianne Cabrera, Lynne Werner
OBJECTIVES: Adults can use slow temporal envelope cues, or amplitude modulation (AM), to identify speech sounds in quiet. Faster AM cues and the temporal fine structure, or frequency modulation (FM), play a more important role in noise. This study assessed whether fast and slow temporal modulation cues play a similar role in infants' speech perception by comparing the ability of normal-hearing 3-month-olds and adults to use slow temporal envelope cues in discriminating consonants contrasts...
March 23, 2017: Ear and Hearing
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334346/directional-asymmetries-in-vowel-perception-of-adult-nonnative-listeners-do-not-change-over-time-with-language-experience
#15
Buddhamas Pralle Kriengwatana, Paola Escudero
Purpose: This study tested an assumption of the Natural Referent Vowel (Polka & Bohn, 2011) framework, namely, that directional asymmetries in adult vowel perception can be influenced by language experience. Method: Data from participants reported in Escudero and Williams (2014) were analyzed. Spanish participants categorized the Dutch vowels /aː/ and /ɑ/ in 2 separate sessions: before and after vowel distributional training. Sessions were 12 months apart. Categorization was assessed using the XAB task, where on each trial participants heard 3 sounds sequentially (first X, then A, then B) and had to decide whether X was more similar to A or B...
March 23, 2017: Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research: JSLHR
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326992/thai-rate-varied-vowel-length-perception-and-the-impact-of-musical-experience
#16
Angela Cooper, Yue Wang, Richard Ashley
Musical experience has been demonstrated to play a significant role in the perception of non-native speech contrasts. The present study examined whether or not musical experience facilitated the normalization of speaking rate in the perception of non-native phonemic vowel length contrasts. Native English musicians and non-musicians (as well as native Thai control listeners) completed identification and AX (same-different) discrimination tasks with Thai vowels contrasting in phonemic length at three speaking rates...
March 2017: Language and Speech
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326988/discrimination-and-identification-of-a-third-formant-frequency-cue-to-place-of-articulation-by-young-children-and-adults
#17
Kelly Richardson, Joan E Sussman
Typically-developing children, 4 to 6 years of age, and adults participated in discrimination and identification speech perception tasks using a synthetic consonant-vowel continuum ranging from /da/ to /ga/. The seven-step synthetic /da/-/ga/ continuum was created by adjusting the first 40 ms of the third formant frequency transition. For the discrimination task, listeners participated in a Change/No-Change paradigm with four different stimuli compared to the endpoint-1 /da/ token. For the identification task, listeners labeled each token along the /da/-/ga/ continuum as either "DA" or "GA...
March 2017: Language and Speech
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28281035/acoustic-context-alters-vowel-categorization-in-perception-of-noise-vocoded-speech
#18
Christian E Stilp
Normal-hearing listeners' speech perception is widely influenced by spectral contrast effects (SCEs), where perception of a given sound is biased away from stable spectral properties of preceding sounds. Despite this influence, it is not clear how these contrast effects affect speech perception for cochlear implant (CI) users whose spectral resolution is notoriously poor. This knowledge is important for understanding how CIs might better encode key spectral properties of the listening environment. Here, SCEs were measured in normal-hearing listeners using noise-vocoded speech to simulate poor spectral resolution...
June 2017: Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology: JARO
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28268130/curbing-the-metallic-mode-in-between-an-empirical-study-qualifying-and-categorizing-restrained-sounds-known-as-curbing-based-on-audio-perception-laryngostroboscopic-imaging-acoustics-ltas-and-egg
#19
Mathias Aaen Thuesen, Julian McGlashan, Cathrine Sadolin
OBJECTIVES: This study aims to study the categorization Curbing from the pedagogical method Complete Vocal Technique as a reduced metallic mode compared with the full metallic modes Overdrive and Edge by means of audio perception, laryngostroboscopic imaging, acoustics, long-term average spectrum (LTAS), and electroglottography (EGG). METHODS: Twenty singers were recorded singing sustained vowels in a restrained character known as Curbing. Two studies were performed: (1) laryngostroboscopic examination using a videonasoendoscopic camera system and the Laryngostrobe program; and (2) simultaneous recording of EGG and acoustic signals using Speech Studio...
March 3, 2017: Journal of Voice: Official Journal of the Voice Foundation
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28267801/t-complex-measures-in-bilingual-spanish-english-and-turkish-german-children-and-monolingual-peers
#20
Tanja Rinker, Valerie L Shafer, Markus Kiefer, Nancy Vidal, Yan H Yu
BACKGROUND: Lateral temporal neural measures (Na and T-complex Ta and Tb) of the auditory evoked potential (AEP) index maturation of auditory/speech processing. These measures are also sensitive to language experience in adults. This paper examined neural responses to a vowel sound at temporal electrodes in four- to five-year-old Spanish-English bilinguals and English monolinguals and in five- to six-year-old Turkish-German bilinguals and German monolinguals. The goal was to determine whether obligatory AEPs at temporal electrode sites were modulated by language experience...
2017: PloS One
keyword
keyword
48032
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"