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OXPHOS disease

S Lühl, H Bode, W Schlötzer, M Bartsakoulia, R Horvath, A Abicht, M Stenzel, J Kirschner, S C Grünert
BACKGROUND: Pontocerebellar hypoplasia type 6 (PCH6) is a mitochondrial disease caused by mutations in the RARS2 gene. RARS2 encodes mitochondrial arginyl transfer RNA synthetase, an enzyme involved in mitochondrial protein translation. A total of 27 patients from 14 families have been reported so far. Characteristic clinical features comprise neonatal lactic acidosis, severe encephalopathy, intractable seizures, feeding problems and profound developmental delay. Most patients show typical neuroradiologic abnormalities including cerebellar hypoplasia and progressive pontocerebellar atrophy...
October 21, 2016: Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
Ahmad Alodaib, Nara Sobreira, Wendy A Gold, Lisa G Riley, Nicole J Van Bergen, Meredith J Wilson, Bruce Bennetts, David R Thorburn, Corinne Boehm, John Christodoulou
Recent advances in next-generation sequencing strategies have led to the discovery of many novel disease genes. We describe here a non-consanguineous family with two affected boys presenting with early onset of severe axonal neuropathy, optic atrophy, intellectual disability, auditory neuropathy and chronic respiratory and gut disturbances. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) was performed on all family members and we identified compound heterozygous variants (c.[760C>A];[1528G>C];p.[(Gln254Lys);(Ala510Pro)] in the polyribonucleotide nucleotidyltransferase 1 (PNPT1) gene in both affected individuals...
October 19, 2016: European Journal of Human Genetics: EJHG
María Salazar-Roa, Marcos Malumbres
Cell division is a complex process with high energy demands. However, how cells regulate the generation of energy required for DNA synthesis and chromosome segregation is not well understood. Recent data suggest that changes in mitochondrial dynamics and metabolic pathways such as oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and glycolysis crosstalk with, and are tightly regulated by, the cell division machinery. Alterations in energy availability trigger cell-cycle checkpoints, suggesting a bidirectional connection between cell division and general metabolism...
September 19, 2016: Trends in Cell Biology
Praveen Mannam, Navin Rauniyar, TuKiet T Lam, Ruiyan Luo, Patty J Lee, Anup Srivastava
Cigarette smoking is the primary risk factor for COPD which is characterized by excessive inflammation and airflow obstruction of the lung. While inflammation is causally related to initiation and progression of COPD, the mitochondrial mechanisms that underlie the associated inflammatory responses are poorly understood. In this context, we have studied the role played by Mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase kinase 3 (MKK3), a dual-specificity protein kinase, in cigarette smoke induced-inflammation and mitochondrial dysfunction...
October 4, 2016: Free Radical Biology & Medicine
Carlos R P Dechandt, Carlos A Couto-Lima, Luciane C Alberici
The research on mitochondrial functions in adipocytes has increasingly evidenced that mitochondria plays an important role in the onset and/or progression of obesity and related pathologies. Mitochondrial function in brown adipose tissue (BAT) has been classically assessed by measuring either the levels/activity of mitochondrial enzymes, or the respiration in isolated mitochondria. Isolation of mitochondria is not advantageous because it demands significant time and amount of tissue and, as tissue homogenates, disrupts biochemical and physical connections of mitochondria within the cell...
December 15, 2016: Analytical Biochemistry
Sara Sameni, Adeela Syed, J Lawrence Marsh, Michelle A Digman
Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal neurodegenerative disorder caused by the expansion of Polyglutamine (polyQ) in exon 1 of the Huntingtin protein. Glutamine repeats below 36 are considered normal while repeats above 40 lead to HD. Impairment in energy metabolism is a common trend in Huntington pathogenesis; however, this effect is not fully understood. Here, we used the phasor approach and Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to measure changes between free and bound fractions of NADH as a indirect measure of metabolic alteration in living cells...
October 7, 2016: Scientific Reports
Monika Oláhová, Kyle Thompson, Steven A Hardy, Inês A Barbosa, Arnaud Besse, Maria-Eleni Anagnostou, Kathryn White, Tracey Davey, Michael A Simpson, Michael Champion, Greg Enns, Susan Schelley, Robert N Lightowlers, Zofia M A Chrzanowska-Lightowlers, Robert McFarland, Charu Deshpande, Penelope E Bonnen, Robert W Taylor
Mitochondrial diseases collectively represent one of the most heterogeneous group of metabolic disorders. Symptoms can manifest at any age, presenting with isolated or multiple-organ involvement. Advances in next-generation sequencing strategies have greatly enhanced the diagnosis of patients with mitochondrial disease, particularly where a mitochondrial aetiology is strongly suspected yet OXPHOS activities in biopsied tissue samples appear normal. We used whole exome sequencing (WES) to identify the molecular basis of an early-onset mitochondrial syndrome-pathogenic biallelic variants in the HTRA2 gene, encoding a mitochondria-localised serine protease-in five subjects from two unrelated families characterised by seizures, neutropenia, hypotonia and cardio-respiratory problems...
September 30, 2016: Journal of Inherited Metabolic Disease
Jason D Arroyo, Alexis A Jourdain, Sarah E Calvo, Carmine A Ballarano, John G Doench, David E Root, Vamsi K Mootha
Oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) is the major pathway for ATP production in humans. Deficiencies in OXPHOS can arise from mutations in either mitochondrial or nuclear genomes and comprise the largest collection of inborn errors of metabolism. At present we lack a complete catalog of human genes and pathways essential for OXPHOS. Here we introduce a genome-wide CRISPR "death screen" that actively selects dying cells to reveal human genes required for OXPHOS, inspired by the classic observation that human cells deficient in OXPHOS survive in glucose but die in galactose...
September 9, 2016: Cell Metabolism
Joeva J Barrow, Eduardo Balsa, Francisco Verdeguer, Clint D J Tavares, Meghan S Soustek, Louis R Hollingsworth, Mark Jedrychowski, Rutger Vogel, Joao A Paulo, Jan Smeitink, Steve P Gygi, John Doench, David E Root, Pere Puigserver
Mitochondrial diseases comprise a heterogeneous group of genetically inherited disorders that cause failures in energetic and metabolic function. Boosting residual oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) activity can partially correct these failures. Herein, using a high-throughput chemical screen, we identified the bromodomain inhibitor I-BET 525762A as one of the top hits that increases COX5a protein levels in complex I (CI) mutant cybrid cells. In parallel, bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4), a target of I-BET 525762A, was identified using a genome-wide CRISPR screen to search for genes whose loss of function rescues death of CI-impaired cybrids grown under conditions requiring OXPHOS activity for survival...
October 6, 2016: Molecular Cell
Tim König, Simon E Tröder, Kavya Bakka, Anne Korwitz, Ricarda Richter-Dennerlein, Philipp A Lampe, Maria Patron, Mareike Mühlmeister, Sergio Guerrero-Castillo, Ulrich Brandt, Thorsten Decker, Ines Lauria, Angela Paggio, Rosario Rizzuto, Elena I Rugarli, Diego De Stefani, Thomas Langer
Mutations in subunits of mitochondrial m-AAA proteases in the inner membrane cause neurodegeneration in spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA28) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP7). m-AAA proteases preserve mitochondrial proteostasis, mitochondrial morphology, and efficient OXPHOS activity, but the cause for neuronal loss in disease is unknown. We have determined the neuronal interactome of m-AAA proteases in mice and identified a complex with C2ORF47 (termed MAIP1), which counteracts cell death by regulating the assembly of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter MCU...
October 6, 2016: Molecular Cell
Scott B Vafai, Emily Mevers, Kathleen W Higgins, Yevgenia Fomina, Jianming Zhang, Anna Mandinova, David Newman, Stanley Y Shaw, Jon Clardy, Vamsi K Mootha
Deficiency of mitochondrial complex I is encountered in both rare and common diseases, but we have limited therapeutic options to treat this lesion to the oxidative phosphorylation system (OXPHOS). Idebenone and menadione are redox-active molecules capable of rescuing OXPHOS activity by engaging complex I-independent pathways of entry, often referred to as "complex I bypass." In the present study, we created a cellular model of complex I deficiency by using CRISPR genome editing to knock out Ndufa9 in mouse myoblasts, and utilized this cell line to develop a high-throughput screening platform for novel complex I bypass factors...
2016: PloS One
Costanza Lamperti, Massimo Zeviani
Mitochondrial disorders is a group of clinical entities associated with abnormalities of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC), which carries out the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) of ADP into ATP. As the MRC is the result of genetic complementation between two separate genomes, nuclear and mitochondrial, OXPHOS failure can derive from mutations in either nuclear-encoded, or mitochondrial-encoded, genes. Epilepsy is a relatively common feature of mitochondrial disease, especially in early-onset encephalopathies of infants and children...
September 1, 2016: Epileptic Disorders: International Epilepsy Journal with Videotape
Gabriele Giachin, Romain Bouverot, Samira Acajjaoui, Serena Pantalone, Montserrat Soler-López
Neurons are extremely energy demanding cells and highly dependent on the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system. Mitochondria generate the energetic potential via the respiratory complexes I to IV, which constitute the electron transport chain (ETC), together with complex V. These redox reactions release energy in the form of ATP and also generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) that are involved in cell signaling but can eventually lead to oxidative stress. Complex I (CI or NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is the largest ETC enzyme, containing 44 subunits and the main contributor to ROS production...
2016: Frontiers in Molecular Biosciences
Speranza Rubattu, Rosita Stanzione, Massimo Volpe
Mechanisms underlying hypertensive target organ damage (TOD) are not completely understood. The pathophysiological role of mitochondrial oxidative stress, resulting from mitochondrial dysfunction, in development of TOD is unclear. The stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHRSP) is a suitable model of human hypertension and of its vascular consequences. Pathogenesis of TOD in SHRSP is multifactorial, being determined by high blood pressure levels, high salt/low potassium diet, and genetic factors. Accumulating evidence points to a key role of mitochondrial dysfunction in increased susceptibility to TOD development of SHRSP...
2016: Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Alexandra I Mot, Jeffrey R Liddell, Anthony R White, Peter J Crouch
Most cells grown in glucose-containing medium generate almost all their ATP via glycolysis despite abundant oxygen supply and functional mitochondria, a phenomenon known as the Crabtree effect. By contrast, most cells within the body rely on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) to generate the bulk of their energy supply. Thus, when utilising the accessibility of cell culture to elucidate fundamental elements of mitochondria in health and disease, it is advantageous to adopt culture conditions under which the cells have greater reliance upon OXPHOS for the supply of their energy needs...
October 2016: International Journal of Biochemistry & Cell Biology
Dmitriy M Niyazov, Stephan G Kahler, Richard E Frye
Mitochondrial disease refers to a heterogeneous group of disorders resulting in defective cellular energy production due to abnormal oxidative phosphorylation (oxphos). Primary mitochondrial disease (PMD) is diagnosed clinically and ideally, but not always, confirmed by a known or indisputably pathogenic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) or nuclear DNA (nDNA) mutation. The PMD genes either encode oxphos proteins directly or they affect oxphos function by impacting production of the complex machinery needed to run the oxphos process...
July 2016: Molecular Syndromology
Silvia Sookoian, Diego Flichman, Romina Scian, Cristian Rohr, Hernán Dopazo, Tomas Fernández Gianotti, Julio San Martino, Gustavo O Castaño, Carlos J Pirola
Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, a decreased liver mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content, and impaired energy metabolism. To understand the clinical implications of mtDNA diversity in the biology of NAFLD, we applied deep-coverage whole sequencing of the liver mitochondrial genomes. We used a multistage study design, including a discovery phase, a phenotype-oriented study to assess the mutational burden in patients with steatohepatitis at different stages of liver fibrosis, and a replication study to validate findings in loci of interest...
August 31, 2016: Journal of Pathology
Veronica Codoni, Yuna Blum, Mete Civelek, Carole Proust, Oscar Franzén, Johan L M Björkegren, Wilfried Le Goff, Francois Cambien, Aldons J Lusis, David-Alexandre Trégouët
Macrophages are key players involved in numerous pathophysiological pathways and an in-depth characterization of their gene regulatory networks can help in better understanding how their dysfunction may impact on human diseases. We here conducted a cross-species network analysis of macrophage gene expression data between human and mouse to identify conserved networks across both species, and assessed whether such networks could reveal new disease-associated regulatory mechanisms. From a sample of 684 individuals processed for genome-wide macrophage gene expression profiling, we identified 27 groups of coexpressed genes (modules)...
October 13, 2016: G3: Genes—Genomes—Genetics
Thangavel Samikkannu, Venkata S R Atluri, Madhavan P N Nair
HIV infection and cocaine use have been identified as risk factors for triggering neuronal dysfunction. In the central nervous system (CNS), energy resource and metabolic function are regulated by astroglia. Glia is the major reservoir of HIV infection and disease progression in CNS. However, the role of cocaine in accelerating HIV associated energy deficit and its impact on neuronal dysfunction has not been elucidated yet. The aim of this study is to elucidate the molecular mechanism of HIV associated neuropathogenesis in cocaine abuse and how it accelerates the energy sensor AMPKs and its subsequent effect on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), BRSKs, CDC25B/C, MAP/Tau, Wee1 and epigenetics remodeling complex SWI/SNF...
2016: Scientific Reports
Sira M Karvinen, Mika Silvennoinen, Hongqiang Ma, Timo Törmäkangas, Timo Rantalainen, Rita Rinnankoski-Tuikka, Sanna Lensu, Lauren G Koch, Steven L Britton, Heikki Kainulainen
The production of heat, i.e., thermogenesis, is a significant component of the metabolic rate, which in turn affects weight gain and health. Thermogenesis is linked to physical activity (PA) level. However, it is not known whether intrinsic exercise capacity, aging, and long-term voluntary running affect core body temperature. Here we use rat models selectively bred to differ in maximal treadmill endurance running capacity (Low capacity runners, LCR and High capacity Runners, HCR), that as adults are divergent for aerobic exercise capacity, aging, and metabolic disease risk to study the connection between PA and body temperature...
2016: Frontiers in Physiology
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