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Urban health

Julia Elisabeth von Oettingen, Tesha Dawn Brathwaite, Christopher Carpenter, Ric Bonnell, Xuemei He, Lewis E Braverman, Elizabeth N Pearce, Philippe Larco, Nancy Charles Larco, Eddy Jean-Baptiste, Rosalind S Brown
CONTEXT: Iodine deficiency is the leading cause of preventable neurodevelopmental delay in children worldwide. It is a possible public health concern in Haiti. OBJECTIVE: To perform a population iodine survey in Haitian young children, and its influence by environmental factors. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study, March-June 2015. SETTING: Community churches in 3 geographical regions in Haiti. PARTICIPANTS: 299 healthy Haitian children aged 9 months to 6 years; 100 enrolled in coastal (C) and mountainous (M) regions, and 99 in an urban region (U)...
October 21, 2016: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Sonia M Hernandez, Catharine N Welch, Valerie E Peters, Erin K Lipp, Shannon Curry, Michael J Yabsley, Susan Sanchez, Andrea Presotto, Peter Gerner-Smidt, Kelley B Hise, Elizabeth Hammond, Whitney M Kistler, Marguerite Madden, April L Conway, Tiffany Kwan, John J Maurer
Worldwide, Salmonella spp. is a significant cause of disease for both humans and wildlife, with wild birds adapted to urban environments having different opportunities for pathogen exposure, infection, and transmission compared to their natural conspecifics. Food provisioning by people may influence these factors, especially when high-density mixed species flocks aggregate. White Ibises (Eudocimus albus), an iconic Everglades species in decline in Florida, are becoming increasingly common in urbanized areas of south Florida where most are hand-fed...
2016: PloS One
Sanket Newale, Deepak S Bachani
AIM: The study was conducted to understand the demographics, prevalence of co-morbid conditions and treatment modalities of depression. METHODS: A cross-sectional, nationwide observational study was conducted to understand the management pattern of depression in India. Depression was majorly diagnosed with DSM-IV TR criteria. RESULTS: The data of 2276 Indian patients across 18 states were collected through 135 mental health professionals. The study population was predominantly from urban (81...
October 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Aparna Lal, Timothy Dobbins, Nasser Bagheri, Michael G Baker, Nigel P French, Simon Hales
The public health risks associated with dairy farming intensification are an emerging concern. We examine the association between dairy cattle density and cryptosporidiosis risk in children <5 years old in New Zealand from 1997 to 2008, a period of rapid intensification of the dairy industry. Multi-level Poisson regression was used to model reported cryptosporidiosis (N = 3869 cases) incidence in relation to dairy cattle densities across urban and rural areas separately, after controlling for microbiological quality of public drinking water supplies and neighbourhood socio-economic factors using the Census Area Unit of residence...
October 20, 2016: EcoHealth
Minh T H Le, Sara Holton, Huong T Nguyen, Rory Wolfe, Jane Fisher
BACKGROUND: Limited evidence is available about poly-victimisation (exposure to multiple forms of victimisation) and mental health among adolescents in low and lower-middle-income countries. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between lifetime exposure to poly-victimisation, health risk behaviours, symptoms of common mental health problems and suicidal ideas in the previous year among high school students in Vietnam. METHODS: Participants were high school students in rural and urban districts of Hanoi, Vietnam...
2016: International Journal of Mental Health Systems
D H Jin, S F Du, B Y Chen, J W Liu, Z X Fu, H J Wang
Objective: To understand the changes on patterns of sleep duration of the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS) cohort in 9 provinces from 2004 to 2011. Methods: Four rounds of CHNS data were used. Urban/rural, age and gender specific insufficient sleeping rates and excessive sleeping rates were analyzed. Results: In 2004, 2006, 2009 and 2011, a total of 274, 281, 329 and 304 children aged 3-5 years; 874, 806, 768 and 742 children aged 6-12 years; 789, 529, 426 and 367 children aged 13-17 years; 9 568, 9 530, 9 942 and 9 609 adults aged ≥18 years were surveyed respectively...
October 10, 2016: Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue za Zhi, Zhonghua Liuxingbingxue Zazhi
Y Tang, L X Wang, J J Chen, J Q Liu, L C Ren, X S Liu, M F Yin, D X Zhang, Y S Huang, J P Zhang
Objective: To analyze the epidemiological characteristics of hospitalized children with severe burn from several regions in China during 3 years, so as to provide evidence for prevention of burns in children. Methods: Relying on the entry system of epidemiology data and biological sample of severe burn from multicenter in clinic, medical records of children with severe burn, aged 18 and under, hospitalized in 6 burn wards from February 2012 to February 2015 were collected. The children were divided into 5 age brackets: less than or equal to 1 year old, more than 1 year old and less than or equal to 3 years old, more than 3 years old and less than or equal to 6 years old, more than 6 years old and less than or equal to 12 years old, more than 12 years old and less than or equal to 18 years old...
October 20, 2016: Zhonghua Shao Shang za Zhi, Zhonghua Shaoshang Zazhi, Chinese Journal of Burns
Naomi Priest, Laura Thompson, Tamara Mackean, Alison Baker, Elizabeth Waters
OBJECTIVE: Australian Indigenous children experience some of the most substantial health inequalities globally. In this context, research regarding their health and well-being has overemphasised physical illnesses with limited exploration of a diverse range of dimensions and determinants, particularly those based on Indigenous holistic understandings of health and well-being. This deficit-based approach has thus missed many strengths and assets of Indigenous children. This research aimed to gain insight into the perspectives of Indigenous children about their health and well-being in an urban setting in Australia...
October 21, 2016: Ethnicity & Health
Emilie Venables, Jeffrey K Edwards, Saar Baert, William Etienne, Kelly Khabala, Helen Bygrave
INTRODUCTION: The number of people on antiretroviral therapy (ART) for the long-term management of HIV in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) is continuing to increase, along with the prevalence of Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs). The need to provide large volumes of HIV patients with ART has led to significant adaptations in how medication is delivered, but access to NCD care remains limited in many contexts. Medication Adherence Clubs (MACs) were established in Kibera, Kenya to address the large numbers of patients requiring chronic HIV and/or NCD care...
2016: PloS One
Darrell L Hudson, Kimberly A Kaphingst, Merriah A Croston, Melvin S Blanchard, Melody S Goodman
We examined the prevalence of mental disorders in a primary care setting affiliated with a large academic medical center. We also examined whether there were racial differences in mental health disorders. Patients were seeking medical care in an outpatient medical clinic; mental health data were available for them via medical records (n=767). Overall, 45% of patients had a diagnosed mental health problem; the most commonly reported form of mental disorder was depression. African Americans (OR= 1.88; CI: 1.21-2...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Jalie A Tucker, Cathy A Simpson, Susan D Chandler, Casey A Borch, Susan L Davies, Shatomi J Kerbawy, Terri H Lewis, M Scott Crawford, JeeWon Cheong, Max Michael
Emerging adulthood often entails heightened risk-taking with potential life-long consequences, and research on risk behaviors is needed to guide prevention programming, particularly in under-served and difficult to reach populations. This study evaluated the utility of Respondent Driven Sampling (RDS), a peer-driven methodology that corrects limitations of snowball sampling, to reach at-risk African American emerging adults from disadvantaged urban communities. Initial "seed" participants from the target group recruited peers, who then recruited their peers in an iterative process (110 males, 234 females; M age = 18...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Shaniece Criss, Dahiana Rodriguez, Roberta E Goldman
Our qualitative study examined how stresses of daily life affected substance use and perceived risk among Black and Hispanic adolescents. We conducted 11 focus groups with students aged 13-25 in public and alternative schools in Providence, Rhode Island, using Bourdieu's Social Practice theoretical approach to guide questioning and data analysis. Despite participants' frequent marijuana use, they perceived the emphasis society places on substance use as misguided, obfuscating the persistence of more critical problems such as stress and reduced opportunity resulting from neighborhood violence, poor schools, financial difficulties, and home troubles...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Fernando A Wagner, Payam Sheikhattari, Jane Buccheri, Mary Gunning, Lisa Bleich, Christine Schutzman
: Smoking disproportionally affects minority and underserved populations but only a handful of interventions tailored to these populations have demonstrated effectiveness in real-life situations. We use community-based participatory research (CBPR) to test two interventions delivered by a community-based health care center. METHODS: Participants randomly assigned to individual or group-based intervention for smoking cessation (N= 400). Both included cessation counseling and health education, a contingency behavioral program, Nicotine Replacement Therapy, and health care for other comorbidities...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Chad K Gentry, Robin P Parker, Christian Ketel, S Trent Rosenbloom, Terri D Crutcher, Aaron W Scott, Jannyse L Starks, Heather A Davidson, Bonita A Pilon
This report describes the role of a clinical pharmacist serving onsite in an interprofessional collaborative practice care model at an urban underserved primary care clinic. It also overviews current health care legislative policy as it relates to expanding pharmacists roles as an integrated team member in medically underserved, vulnerable populations.
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Herenia P Lawrence, Jaime Cidro, Sonia Isaac-Mann, Sabrina Peressini, Marion Maar, Robert J Schroth, Janet N Gordon, Laurie Hoffman-Goetz, John R Broughton, Lisa Jamieson
This study assessed links between racism and oral health outcomes among pregnant Canadian Aboriginal women. Baseline data were analyzed for 541 First Nations (94.6%) and Métis (5.4%) women in an early childhood caries preventive trial conducted in urban and on-reserve communities in Ontario and Manitoba. One-third of participants experienced racism in the past year determined by the Measure of Indigenous Racism Experience. In logistic regressions, outcomes significantly associated with incidents of racism included: wearing dentures, off-reserve dental care, asked to pay for dental services, perceived need for preventive care, flossing more than once daily, having fewer than 21 natural teeth, fear of going to dentist, never received orthodontic treatment and perceived impact of oral conditions on quality of life...
2016: Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved
Rajeev Gupta, Raghuvir Singh Khedar, Raja Babu Panwar
Hypertension is the most important cause of global burden of disease. It is highly prevalent in India and other low and lower-middle income countries. Prevalence of uncontrolled hypertension varies from 70-90% and is significantly greater in rural vs urban locations. Guidelines based treatment strategy has improved blood pressure (BP) control in high income countries but no context-specific guidelines exist in low and lower-middle income countries such as India. There are numerous barriers to proper BP control in these countries and include political apathy, bureaucratic inertia, weak health systems, overburdened healthcare providers and unempowered patients...
September 2016: Journal of the Association of Physicians of India
Geerte C Den Hollander, Joyce L Browne, Daniel Arhinful, Rieke van der Graaf, Kerstin Klipstein-Grobusch
To address the burden of maternal morbidity and mortality in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), research with pregnant women in these settings is increasingly common. Pregnant women in LMIC-context may experience vulnerability related to giving consent to participate in a clinical trial. To recognize possible layers of vulnerability this study aims to identify factors that influence the decision process towards clinical trial participation of pregnant women in an urban middle-income setting. This qualitative research used participant observation, in-depth interviews, and focus group discussion with medical staff and pregnant women eligible for trial participation, at a regional hospital in Accra, Ghana...
October 20, 2016: Developing World Bioethics
Kate E Smith, Martin M Shafer, Debora Weiss, Henry A Anderson, Patrick R Gorski
Exposure to the neurotoxic element lead (Pb) continues to be a major human health concern, particularly for children in US urban settings, and the need for robust tools for assessment of exposure sources has never been greater. The latest generation of multicollector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS) instrumentation offers the capability of using Pb isotopic signatures as a tool for environmental source tracking in public health. We present a case where MC-ICPMS was applied to isotopically resolve Pb sources in human clinical samples...
October 19, 2016: Biological Trace Element Research
Vittorio Govoni, Elena Della Coletta, Edward Cesnik, Ilaria Casetta, Enrico Granieri
Pathogenesis could play an important role in the mid- to late-life onset of symptoms in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). An analysis of the age at onset of ALS among the incident cases occurring in the population in the Health District of Ferrara, Italy, in the period 1064-2009 was carried out. Two subsequent 23-year time intervals (1964-1986 and 1987-2009) were considered. The mean age at onset (MAAO) was estimated in relation to gender, onset type and area of residence (urban or extra-urban) at disease onset among the incident cases which occurred in the two subsequent time intervals...
October 19, 2016: Acta Neurologica Belgica
Shabnam Niroumand, Maliheh Dadgarmoghaddam, Babak Eghbali, Maryam Abrishami, Arash Gholoobi, Hamid Reza Bahrami Taghanaki, Mohammad Khajedaluee
BACKGROUND: Diabetes mellitus is assumed to be a strong risk factor for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and is frequently associated with other CVD risk factors. OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of different patterns of dyslipidemia in individuals with diabetes compared with non-diabetic subjects and evaluate other accompanied CVD risk factors between the two groups. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This was an analytical cross-sectional study on 230 participants, aged 28 - 66 years old, who were referred to different urban health centers of Khorasan Razavi province (north-east of Iran)...
August 2016: Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal
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