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Agricultural animal

Christoph Jans, Eleonora Sarno, Lucie Collineau, Leo Meile, Katharina D C Stärk, Roger Stephan
Background: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) in bacteria is an increasing health concern. The spread of AMR bacteria (AMRB) between animals and humans via the food chain and the exchange of AMR genes requires holistic approaches for risk mitigation. The AMRB exposure of humans via food is currently only poorly understood leaving an important gap for intervention design. Method: This study aimed to assess AMRB prevalence in retail food and subsequent exposure of Swiss consumers in a systematic literature review of data published between 1996 and 2016 covering the Swiss agriculture sector and relevant imported food...
2018: Frontiers in Microbiology
Alfred Mitema, Sheila Okoth, Mohamed S Rafudeen
Toxigenic Aspergillus species produce mycotoxins that are carcinogenic, hepatotoxic and teratogenic immunosuppressing agents in both human and animals. Kenya frequently experiences outbreaks of aflatoxicosis with the worst occurring in 2010, which resulted in 215 deaths. We examined the possible reasons for these frequent aflatoxicosis outbreaks in Kenya by studying Aspergillus flavus diversity, phenotypes and mycotoxin profiles across various agricultural regions. Using diagonal transect random sampling, maize kernels were collected from Makueni, Homa Bay, Nandi, and Kisumu counties...
April 2018: Fungal Biology
Tamsin Lyons, Anita Bielak, Evelyn Doyle, Björn Kuhla
Considerable interest exists both from an environmental and economic perspective in reducing methane emissions from agriculture. In ruminants, CH4 is produced by a complex community of microorganisms that is established in early life but can be influenced by external factors such as feed. Although CH4 emissions were thought to be constant once an animal reached maturity, recent studies have shown that CH4 yield significantly increases from early to late lactation in dairy cows. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that increases in CH4 yield over the lactation cycle are related to changes in rumen microbial community structure...
March 14, 2018: Journal of Dairy Science
Maolan Wang, Ronghao Liu, Xiuying Lu, Ziyi Zhu, Hailin Wang, Lei Jiang, Jingjing Liu, Zhihua Wu
Heavy metal are often added to animal fodder and accumulate in the soils with swine manure. In this study, heavy metal (Cu, Pb, Cd, Zn, As and Cr) concentrations were determined in agricultural soils irrigated with swine manure in Jiangxi Province, China. Results showed that the average concentrations of Cu, Zn, As and Cr (32.8, 93.7, 21.3 and 75.8 mg/kg, respectively) were higher than the background values, while Pb and Cd (15.2 and 0.090 mg/kg, respectively) were lower than the background values. Contamination factors [Formula: see text] indicated that they were generally moderate for Cu, Zn, As and Cr and generally low for Pb and Cd...
March 15, 2018: Bulletin of Environmental Contamination and Toxicology
Yunlong Zou, Zhiyuan Li, Yunjing Zou, Haiyang Hao, Ning Li, Qiuyan Li
The regulatory function of Fbxo40 has been well characterized in mice. As a key component of the SCF-E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, Fbxo40 induces IRS1 ubiquitination, thus inactivating the IGF1/Akt pathway. The expression of Fbxo40 is restricted to muscle, and mice with an Fbxo40 null mutation exhibit muscle hypertrophy. However, the function of FBXO40 has not been elucidated in pigs, and it is not known whether FBXO40 mutations affect their health. We therefore generated FBXO40 knockout pigs using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology...
March 12, 2018: Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications
Lisa M Durso, Kimberly L Cook
Agriculture reflects One Health principals, with the job of the farmer being to sustainably balance human, animal, and soil health. It is imperative to include an agricultural perspective when addressing antibiotic resistance (AR) from a One Health perspective, as the farmers, ranchers, and agricultural professionals have an intimate working knowledge of these complex systems, and they will be on the front lines of implementing on-farm control measures. Currently, communication across the One Health triad (humans, animals, environment) regarding agricultural AR is hindered by ambiguous language, complicated by cultural and linguistic differences that can lead to the conclusion that the other participant is not aware of the facts, or has ulterior motives...
March 14, 2018: EcoHealth
D P Berry, A O'Brien, J O'Donovan, N McHugh, E Wall, S Randles, K McDermott, R E O'Connor, M A Patil, J Ho, A Kennedy, N Byrne, D C Purfield
Early detection of karyotype abnormalities, including aneuploidy, could aid producers in identifying animals which, for example, would not be suitable candidate parents. Genome-wide genetic marker data in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are now being routinely generated on animals. The objective of the present study was to describe the statistics that could be generated from the allele intensity values from such SNP data to diagnose karyotype abnormalities; of particular interest was whether detection of aneuploidy was possible with both commonly used genotyping platforms in agricultural species, namely the Applied BiosystemsTM AxiomTM and the Illumina platform...
March 15, 2018: Animal: An International Journal of Animal Bioscience
Safiou B Adehan, Hassane Adakal, Donald Gbinwoua, Daté Yokossi, Sébastien Zoungrana, Patrice Toé, Mathieu Ouedraogo, A Michel Gbaguidi, Camus Adoligbé, A Belarmin Fandohan, Gildas Hounmanou, Romain Glèlè Kakaï, Souaïbou Farougou, Eva M De Clercq
Worldwide, cattle production is struggling to face the negative impacts caused by ticks and Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus is one of the most harmful ticks for livestock. Most of the people in West Africa depend on cattle farming and subsistence agriculture. The presence of ticks on cattle is a major problem faced by smallholder farmers who fight for their livelihood. National and regional tick control programs could assist these rural communities in protecting their livelihoods against ticks and tick-borne diseases, but only if they take into account the targeted herders and their perception on cattle management and tick control...
March 13, 2018: EcoHealth
Éverton L Vogt, Jorge F A Model, Anapaula S Vinagre
Organotins (OTs) are considered some of the most toxic chemicals introduced into aquatic environments by anthropogenic activities. They are widely used for agricultural and industrial purposes and as antifouling additives on boat hull's paints. Even though the use of OTs was banned in 2008, elevated levels of OTs can still be detected in aquatic environments. OTs' deleterious effects upon wildlife and experimental animals are well documented and include endocrine disruption, immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity, genotoxicity, and metabolic dysfunction...
2018: Frontiers in Endocrinology
Shannon E Majowicz, E Jane Parmley, Carolee Carson, Katarina Pintar
OBJECTIVE: Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a critical public health issue that involves interrelationships between people, animals, and the environment. Traditionally, interdisciplinary efforts to mitigate AMR in the food chain have involved public health, human and veterinary medicine, and agriculture stakeholders. Our objective was to identify a more diverse range of stakeholders, beyond those traditionally engaged in AMR mitigation efforts, via diagramming both proximal and distal factors impacting, or impacted by, use and resistance along the Canadian food chain...
March 12, 2018: BMC Research Notes
Jake A Godfrey, Ann L Rypstra
For animals that live in association with humans, a key ecological question is how anthropogenic factors influence their life history. While major negative effects are obvious, subtle non-lethal responses to anthropogenic stimuli may provide insight into the features that lead to the success of species that thrive in habitats heavily impacted by humans. Here we explored the influence of the herbicide atrazine on various life history traits of a wolf spider that thrives in agroecosystems where it is commonly applied...
March 5, 2018: Chemosphere
Erika E Scott, Nicole Krupa, Paul L Jenkins
This article provides an estimate for the economic costs of agricultural injuries sustained in the states of Maine and New Hampshire between the years 2008 and 2010. The authors used a novel dataset of 562 agriculturally related occupational injuries, and cost estimates were generated using the CDC's Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System (WISQARS). Individual cases from the dataset that did not match the query options for WISQARS were excluded. Of the 562 agricultural injuries identified in the dataset, 361 met the WISQARS criteria...
January 29, 2018: Journal of Agricultural Safety and Health
Serina L Robinson, Jonathan P Badalamenti, Anthony G Dodge, Lambros J Tassoulas, Lawrence P Wackett
Biuret is a minor component of urea fertilizer and an intermediate in s-triazine herbicide biodegradation. The microbial metabolism of biuret has never been comprehensively studied. Here we enriched and isolated bacteria from a potato field that grew on biuret as a sole nitrogen source. We sequenced the genome of the fastest-growing isolate, Herbaspirillum sp. BH-1 and identified genes encoding putative biuret hydrolases (BHs). We purified and characterized a functional BH enzyme from Herbaspirillum sp. BH-1 and two other bacteria from divergent phyla...
March 12, 2018: Environmental Microbiology
Michael Hemkemeyer, Anja B Dohrmann, Bent T Christensen, Christoph C Tebbe
Genetic fingerprinting demonstrated in previous studies that differently sized soil particle fractions (PSFs; clay, silt, and sand with particulate organic matter (POM)) harbor microbial communities that differ in structure, functional potentials and sensitivity to environmental conditions. To elucidate whether specific bacterial or archaeal taxa exhibit preference for specific PSFs, we examined the diversity of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes by high-throughput sequencing using total DNA extracted from three long-term fertilization variants (unfertilized, fertilized with minerals, and fertilized with animal manure) of an agricultural loamy sand soil and their PSFs...
2018: Frontiers in Microbiology
Marianne Smith Edge, Mary Elizabeth Kunkel, Jennifer Schmidt, Constantina Papoutsakis
In the late 20th century, plant breeders began using molecular biology techniques such as recombinant DNA, also known as genetic engineering, along with traditional cross-breeding. Ten plant and one animal food have been approved for commercialization in the United States. Today, foods and ingredients from genetically engineered (GE) crops are present throughout the food supply, which has led to varying levels of acceptance. Much discussion exists among consumers and health professionals about the believability of statements made regarding benefits or risks of GE foods...
March 8, 2018: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Yiftach Golov, Jan Rillich, Ally Harari, Amir Ayali
Studies of mating and reproductive behavior have contributed much to our understanding of various animals' ecological success. The desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria , is an important agricultural pest. However, knowledge of locust courtship and precopulatory behavior is surprisingly limited. Here we provide a comprehensive study of the precopulatory behavior of both sexes of the desert locust in the gregarious phase, with particular emphasis on the conflict between the sexes. Detailed HD-video monitoring of courtship and mating of 20 locust pairs, in a controlled environment, enabled both qualitative and quantitative descriptions of the behavior...
2018: PeerJ
Ian Pepper, John P Brooks, Charles P Gerba
Recently, there has been increased concern about the presence of antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) and antibiotic resistant genes (ARG), in treated domestic wastewaters, animal manures and municipal biosolids. The concern is whether these additional sources of ARB contribute to antibiotic resistance levels in the environment, i.e. "environmental antibiotic resistance." ARB and ARG occur naturally in soil and water, and it remains unclear whether the introduction of ARB in liquid and solid municipal and animal wastes via land application have any significant impact on the background levels of antibiotic resistance in the environment, and whether they affect human exposure to ARB...
March 5, 2018: Environmental Science & Technology
Andreas Hemp, Claudia Hemp
Biodiversity studies of global change mainly focus on direct impacts such as losses in species numbers or ecosystem functions. In this study, we focus on the long-term effects of recent land-cover conversion and subsequent ecological isolation of Kilimanjaro on biodiversity in a paleobiogeographical context, linking our findings with the long-standing question whether colonization of African mountains mainly depended on long-distance dispersal, or whether gradual migration has been possible through habitat bridges under colder climates...
March 5, 2018: Global Change Biology
S N Karshima
Knowledge of endemic helminths in a resource-limited country such as Nigeria is essential for their diagnosis, treatment and cost-effective control. In the present study, the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) guideline was employed to determine the prevalence and geographical distribution of zoonotic helminths in food animals slaughtered in Nigerian abattoirs between 1970 and 2016. Pooled prevalence estimate (PPE) was determined by the random-effects model while heterogeneity was evaluated using the Cochran's Q-test...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Helminthology
Donghai Peng, Danfeng Wan, Chunsheng Cheng, Xiaobo Ye, Ming Sun
Parasitic nematodes of animals and plants cause worldwide devastating impacts on people's lives and agricultural crops. The crystal protein Cry5B produced by Bacillus thuringiensis has efficient and specific activity against a wide range of nematodes. However, the action mode of this toxin has not yet been thoroughly determined. Here, a nematode-specific cadherin CDH-8 was demonstrated to be a receptor for Cry5B toxin by using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model, providing evidence that the cadherin mutant worm cdh-8(RB815) possesses significant resistance to Cry5B, and the CDH-8 fragments bind specifically to Cry5B...
March 3, 2018: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
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