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Mass casualty event

Mersedeh TariVerdi, Elise Miller-Hooks, Thomas Kirsch
Mass casualty incidents are a concern in many urban areas. A community's ability to cope with such events depends on the capacities and capabilities of its hospitals for handling a sudden surge in demand of patients with resource-intensive and specialized medical needs. This paper uses a whole-hospital simulation model to replicate medical staff, resources, and space for the purpose of investigating hospital responsiveness to mass casualty incidents. It provides details of probable demand patterns of different mass casualty incident types in terms of patient categories and arrival patterns, and accounts for related transient system behavior over the response period...
March 19, 2018: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
Curtis Harris, Kelli McCarthy, E Liang Liu, Kelly Klein, Raymond Swienton, Parker Prins, Tawny Waltz
2017 was a record year for disasters and disaster response in the U.S. Redefining and differentiating key response roles like "immediate responders" and "first responders" is critical. Traditional first responders are not and cannot remain the only cadre of expected lifesavers following a mass casualty event. The authors argue that the U.S. needs to expand its understanding of response roles to include that of the immediate responders, or those individuals who find themselves at the incident scene and are able to assist others...
March 16, 2018: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Olivia Sonneborn, Charne Miller, Leon Head, Rachel Cross
BACKGROUND: Operating theatre services can be heavily relied upon during mass casualty disaster events, which require nurses to have adequate training and education of hospital disaster management plans to respond appropriately. The evidence-base of disaster preparedness in the acute setting is limited, particularly with regard to operating theatre nurses. OBJECTIVES: Explore operating theatre nurse's disaster knowledge of their role in a mass casualty event, and identify the preferred mode of disaster education and training to improve disaster preparedness...
February 21, 2018: Nurse Education Today
Preston L Carter
A brief historical account of the Halifax Explosion, one of North America's greatest mass urban trauma casualty events of the 20th century. This disaster, in Halifax, Nova Scotia, was the result of the cataclysmic explosion of a fully loaded World War I munitions ship on the densely waterfront of that city, resulting in nearly 2000 fatalities and 9000 injured. It remains a case study in response to disasters which overwhelm local medical capabilities.
December 15, 2017: American Journal of Surgery
Anup K Bhattacharya, Sarah Fenerty, Omer A Awan, Beverly Hershey, Gary Cohen, Padmaja Jonnalagadda, Stephen Ling, Sayed Ali
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this article is to describe the injury patterns observed in the 2015 Philadelphia Amtrak train derailment. CONCLUSION: Fractures accounted for most observed injuries, but uncommon and potentially serious injuries included posterior sternoclavicular dislocation and mesenteric contusion. Imaging plays a critical role in the triage of patients during mass-casualty events, and familiarity with the injury patterns associated with high-velocity unrestrained blunt force trauma will aid diagnosis in any future similar occurrence...
February 28, 2018: AJR. American Journal of Roentgenology
Aaron Cunningham, Marc Auerbach, Mark Cicero, Mubeen Jafri
BACKGROUND: Recent mass casualty events in the United States have highlighted the need for public preparedness to prevent death from uncontrolled hemorrhage. The Pediatric Trauma Society (PTS) reviewed the literature regarding pediatric tourniquet usage with the aim to provide recommendations about the utility of this adjunct for hemorrhage control in children. METHODS: Search terms "pediatric" and "tourniquet" were used to query the US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health for pertinent literature...
February 17, 2018: Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery
Monika Simjanoska, Bojana Koteska, Ana Madevska Bogdanova, Nevena Ackovska, Vladimir Trajkovik, Magdalena Kostoska
Low-cost biosensors combined with low-cost portable devices can be very useful in time critical situations of mass casualties, when fast triage procedure must be attained. A methodology that uses ECG to derive the vital parameters (heart rate and respiratory rate) needed for the triage procedure is presented and it is aimed to leverage affordable low-cost equipment that can be easily utilized by urgent medical units or even volunteers in events of considerable number of injured civilians. The methodology relies on selected well-known and published algorithms for heart rate and respiratory rate derivation from a given ECG signal...
January 30, 2018: Technology and Health Care: Official Journal of the European Society for Engineering and Medicine
Kevin Ryan, Douglas George, James Liu, Patricia Mitchell, Kerrie Nelson, Ricky Kue
BACKGROUND: Mass casualty incident (MCI) triage and the use of triage tags to assign treatment priorities are not fully implemented despite emergency medical services (EMS) personnel training during drills and exercises. OBJECTIVES: To compare current field triage practices during both training and actual MCIs and identify any potential barriers to use. METHODS: During training sessions from November 2015 through March 2016, an anonymous survey was distributed to personnel in 3 distinct types of paid full-time EMS systems: Boston EMS (2-tiered, municipal third-service); Portland Fire Department (fire department-based ALS); and Stokes County EMS (county-based ALS) combined with Forsyth County EMS (county-based ALS)...
February 9, 2018: Prehospital Emergency Care
Chih-Long Pan, Chih-Hao Lin, Yan-Ren Lin, Hsin-Yu Wen, Jet-Chau Wen
Due to the increasing number of natural and man-made disasters, mass casualty incidents occur more often than ever before. As a result, health care providers need to adapt in order to cope with the overwhelming patient surge. To ensure quality and safety in health care, accurate information in pandemic disease control, death reduction, and health quality promotion should be highlighted. However, obtaining precise information in real time is an enormous challenge to all researchers of the field. In this paper, innovative strategies are presented to develop a sound information network using the concept of "witness sensors...
February 2, 2018: Journal of Medical Internet Research
Catherine Cummings, James Monti, Leo Kobayashi, John Potvin, Kenneth Williams, Francis Sullivan
A routine call for a common medical emergency was expeditiously identified by the responding emergency medical service as a multiple victim carbon monoxide exposure. The event circumstances, exemplary fire department emergency medical services response, and ensuing hos- pital emergency department response are described. [Full article available at].
February 2, 2018: Rhode Island Medical Journal
John Wenham, Paul Bennett, Wendy Gleeson
BACKGROUND: Far West New South Wales Local Emergency Management Committee runs an annual crash simulation exercise to assess the operational readiness of all local emergency services to coordinate and manage a multi-casualty exercise. CONTEXT: Since 2009, the Broken Hill University Department of Rural Health (BHUDRH) has collaborated with the committee, enabling the inclusion of health students in this exercise. It is an immersive interprofessional learning experience that evaluates teamwork, communication and safe effective clinical trauma management outside the hospital setting...
December 26, 2017: Clinical Teacher
Ling-Wei Kuo, Cheng-I Yen, Chih-Yuan Fu, Chun-Hao Pan, Chih-Po Hsu, Yen-Chang Hsiao, Chi-Hsun Hsieh, Yu-Pao Hsu
PURPOSE: The Formosa Fun Coast explosion is an internationally-known event that occurred in Taiwan on June 27th, 2015. The blast involved 495 casualties in total, with 253 patients receiving 2nd degree or deeper burns on greater than 40% of the total body surface area (TBSA). Questions were raised regarding whether these victims were sent to the appropriate hospitals or not. Therefore, we analyzed the effect of the initial admission destination in this study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all of the victims from the explosion who were sent to the emergency department of Linkou and Keelung Chang Gung Memorial Hospitals...
December 16, 2017: Burns: Journal of the International Society for Burn Injuries
Jin-Jun Zhang, Tian-Bing Wang, Da Fan, Jun Zhang, Bao-Guo Jiang
BACKGROUND: On August 12, 2015, a hazardous chemical explosion occurred in the Tianjin Port of China. The explosions resulted in 165 deaths, 8 missing people, injuries to thousands of people. We present the responses of emergency medical services and hospitals to the explosions and summarize the lessons that can be learned. METHODS: This study was a retrospective analysis of the responses of emergency medical services and hospitals to the Tianjin explosions. Data on injuries, outcomes, and patient flow were obtained from the government and the hospitals...
December 4, 2017: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
Samuel E Shartar, Brooks L Moore, Lori M Wood
OBJECTIVES: Metropolitan areas must be prepared to manage large numbers of casualties related to a major incident. Most US cities do not have adequate trauma center capacity to manage large-scale mass casualty incidents (MCIs). Creating surge capacity requires the distribution of casualties to hospitals that are not designated as trauma centers. Our objectives were to extrapolate MCI response research into operational objectives for MCI distribution plan development; formulate a patient distribution model based on research, hospital capacities, and resource availability; and design and disseminate a casualty distribution tool for use by emergency medical services (EMS) personnel to distribute patients to the appropriate level of care...
December 2017: Southern Medical Journal
(no author information available yet)
Large-scale catastrophic events and infectious disease outbreaks highlight the need for disaster planning at all community levels. Features unique to the obstetric population (including antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum and neonatal care) warrant special consideration in the event of a disaster. Pregnancy increases the risks of untoward outcomes from various infectious diseases. Trauma during pregnancy presents anatomic and physiologic considerations that often can require increased use of resources such as higher rates of cesarean delivery...
December 2017: Obstetrics and Gynecology
(no author information available yet)
Large-scale catastrophic events and infectious disease outbreaks highlight the need for disaster planning at all community levels. Features unique to the obstetric population (including antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum and neonatal care) warrant special consideration in the event of a disaster. Pregnancy increases the risks of untoward outcomes from various infectious diseases. Trauma during pregnancy presents anatomic and physiologic considerations that often can require increased use of resources such as higher rates of cesarean delivery...
December 2017: Obstetrics and Gynecology
Paul Hunt
BACKGROUND: Recent events involving a significant number of casualties have emphasised the importance of appropriate preparation for receiving hospitals, especially Emergency Departments, during the initial response phase of a major incident. Development of a mass casualty resilience and response framework in the Northern Trauma Network included a review of existing planning assumptions in order to ensure effective resource allocation, both in local receiving hospitals and system-wide...
December 2017: Emergency Medicine Journal: EMJ
Jane Currie, Sarah Kourouche, Christopher Gordon, Christine Jorm, Sandra West
With the increasing risk of mass casualty incidents from extreme climate events, global terrorism, pandemics and nuclear incidents, it's important to prepare nurses with skills and knowledge necessary to manage such incidents. There are very few documented accounts of the inclusion of mass casualty education within undergraduate nursing programs. This paper is the first to describe undergraduate mass casualty nursing education in Australia. A final year Bachelor of Nursing undergraduate subject was developed...
October 28, 2017: Nurse Education in Practice
Christopher G Moran, Catherine Webb, Karim Brohi, Martin Smith, Keith Willett
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 25, 2017: BMJ: British Medical Journal
Matthew F Toerper, Gabor D Kelen, Lauren M Sauer, Jamil D Bayram, Christina Catlett, Scott Levin
The National Center for the Study of Preparedness and Catastrophic Event Response (PACER) has created a publicly available simulation tool called Surge (accessible at to estimate surge capacity for user-defined hospitals. Based on user input, a Monte Carlo simulation algorithm forecasts available hospital bed capacity over a 7-day period and iteratively assesses the ability to accommodate disaster patients. Currently, the tool can simulate bed capacity for acute mass casualty events (such as explosions) only and does not specifically simulate staff and supply inventory...
October 18, 2017: Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness
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