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Disease ecology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28337900/the-fingerprint-of-the-human-gastrointestinal-tract-microbiota-a-hypothesis-of-molecular-mapping
#1
G Tomasello, M Mazzola, A Jurjus, F Cappello, F Carini, P Damiani, A Gerges Geagea, M N Zeenny, A Leone
The precise etiology of Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IDB) remains unclear and several factors are believed to play a role in its development and progression, including the composition of microbial communities resident in the gastrointestinal tract. Human intestinal microbiota are extensive with at least 15,000-36,000 bacterial species. However, thanks to the new development in sequencing and molecular taxonomic methodologies, our understanding of the microbiota population composition, dynamics, and ecology has greatly increased...
January 2017: Journal of Biological Regulators and Homeostatic Agents
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28335502/catechins-and-their-therapeutic-benefits-to-inflammatory-bowel-disease
#2
REVIEW
Fei-Yan Fan, Li-Xuan Sang, Min Jiang
Catechins are natural polyphenolic phytochemicals that exist in food and medicinal plants, such as tea, legume and rubiaceae. An increasing number of studies have associated the intake of catechins-rich foods with the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases in humans, such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Some studies have demonstrated that catechins could significantly inhibit the excessive oxidative stress through direct or indirect antioxidant effects and promote the activation of the antioxidative substances such as glutathione peroxidases (GPO) and glutathione (GSH), reducing the oxidative damages to the colon...
March 19, 2017: Molecules: a Journal of Synthetic Chemistry and Natural Product Chemistry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334251/isolation-of-vibrionaceae-from-wild-blue-mussel-mytilus-edulis-adults-and-their-impact-on-blue-mussel-larviculture
#3
Mieke Eggermont, Peter Bossier, Gde Sasmita Julyantoro Pande, Vyshal Delahaut, Ali Md Rayhan, Nipa Gupta, Shikder Saiful Islam, Elsie Yumo, Nancy Nevejan, Patrick Sorgeloos, Bruno Gomez-Gil, Tom Defoirdt
The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) is known as a robust mollusk species, although its larviculture appears to be highly susceptible to diseases. In this study, we isolated 17 strains from induced mortality events in healthy wild-caught blue mussel adults and demonstrated that they caused between 17 and 98% mortality in blue mussel larvae in a newly developed, highly controlled immersion challenge test model. Eight of the isolates belong to the Splendidus clade of vibrios, while the other isolates belong to the genus Photobacterium...
March 15, 2017: FEMS Microbiology Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28334041/virus-mediated-suppression-of-host-non-self-recognition-facilitates-horizontal-transmission-of-heterologous-viruses
#4
Songsong Wu, Jiasen Cheng, Yanping Fu, Tao Chen, Daohong Jiang, Said A Ghabrial, Jiatao Xie
Non-self recognition is a common phenomenon among organisms; it often leads to innate immunity to prevent the invasion of parasites and maintain the genetic polymorphism of organisms. Fungal vegetative incompatibility is a type of non-self recognition which often induces programmed cell death (PCD) and restricts the spread of molecular parasites. It is not clearly known whether virus infection could attenuate non-self recognition among host individuals to facilitate its spread. Here, we report that a hypovirulence-associated mycoreovirus, named Sclerotinia sclerotiorum mycoreovirus 4 (SsMYRV4), could suppress host non-self recognition and facilitate horizontal transmission of heterologous viruses...
March 2017: PLoS Pathogens
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28332646/the-role-of-animal-reservoirs-in-social-environmental-landscapes-remarks-on-the-control-of-avian-influenza-and-preparedness-for-pandemics
#5
M P Ortiz-Rodríguez, G C Ramírez-Nieto, L C Villamil-Jiménez
Influenza viruses are well known for their ability to infect and cause disease in a broad range of hosts. Modern advances in reverse genetics have enabled scientists to probe the mutations that allow influenza viruses to perform host switching. Despite this detailed understanding of the molecular modifications that allow host switching and adaptation, there is a gap in knowledge regarding the factors external to the virus and their interactions that act as triggers leading to a pandemic. Studies on the ecology of zoonotic pathogens should be the new paradigm for understanding not only influenza viruses but any other infectious disease that can be a threat to animal and human health...
December 2016: Revue Scientifique et Technique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28327796/keeping-track-of-hidden-dangers-the-short-history-of-the-sabi%C3%A3-virus
#6
Joel Henrique Ellwanger, José Artur Bogo Chies
Emerging infectious diseases are a global threat. In countries like Brazil, where biodiversity is high and public health conditions in terms of infrastructure and medical care are often precarious, emerging diseases are particularly worrisome. The lack of monitoring strategies to identify pathogens with the potential to cause outbreaks or epidemics is another problem in Brazil and other developing countries. In this article, we present the history of the Sabiá virus (SABV), a pathogen that was described in the 1990s in Brazil...
January 2017: Revista da Sociedade Brasileira de Medicina Tropical
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28327792/vegetation-loss-and-the-2016-oropouche-fever-outbreak-in-peru
#7
Daniel Romero-Alvarez, Luis E Escobar
BACKGROUND: Oropouche virus causes Oropouche fever, an arboviral disease transmitted mainly by midges of the genus Culicoides and Culex mosquitoes. Clinical presentation of Oropouche fever in humans includes fever, headache, rash, myalgia, and in rare cases spontaneous bleeding and aseptic meningitis. Landscape change has been proposed as a driver of Oropouche fever emergence. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the landscape epidemiology of the Oropouche fever outbreak that began in April 2016 in Cusco, Peru...
April 2017: Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28327788/evaluation-of-the-impact-of-serogroup-c-meningococcal-disease-vaccination-program-in-brazil-and-its-regions-a-population-based-study-2001-2013
#8
Camile de Moraes, José Cássio de Moraes, Gabriela Drummond Marques da Silva, Elisabeth Carmen Duarte
BACKGROUND: Meningococcal C conjugate (MenC) vaccine was introduced as part of the Brazilian National Immunisation Program in 2010 for children < 1 year of age. OBJECTIVES: The study objective was to evaluate the impact of this vaccination strategy. METHODS: An observational, mixed ecological and analytical study was conducted, based on time series panel data from surveillance records (2001-2013). FINDINGS: A total of 37,538 of meningococcal disease cases were recorded during the study period...
April 2017: Memórias do Instituto Oswaldo Cruz
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28326308/infection-sources-of-a-common-non-tuberculous-mycobacterial-pathogen-mycobacterium-avium-complex
#9
REVIEW
Yukiko Nishiuchi, Tomotada Iwamoto, Fumito Maruyama
Numerous studies have revealed a continuous increase in the worldwide incidence and prevalence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) diseases, especially pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) diseases. Although it is not clear why NTM diseases have been increasing, one possibility is an increase of mycobacterial infection sources in the environment. Thus, in this review, we focused on the infection sources of pathogenic NTM, especially MAC. The environmental niches for MAC include water, soil, and dust...
2017: Frontiers in Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28325935/a-comparison-study-of-zika-virus-outbreaks-in-french-polynesia-colombia-and-the-state-of-bahia-in-brazil
#10
Daihai He, Daozhou Gao, Yijun Lou, Shi Zhao, Shigui Ruan
Zika virus (ZIKV) disease outbreaks occurred in French Polynesia in 2013-2014 and in Brazil and Colombia in 2015-2016, respectively. Using our recently developed ZIKV disease model, we simulated the reported ZIKV infection cases from French Polynesia, Colombia and the State of Bahia of Brazil. Moreover, we estimated that the infection attack rates were 78.0% (95% confidence interval (CI): 63.5-86.3%) in French Polynesia which closely matches a previous serological study; 20.8% (95% CI: 1.1-50.0%) in Colombia which suggests that the attack rate was most likely less than 50%; and 32...
March 21, 2017: Scientific Reports
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28323070/urbanization-and-the-dynamics-of-rna-viruses-in-mallards-anas-platyrhynchos
#11
Michelle Wille, Kristine Lindqvist, Shaman Muradrasoli, Björn Olsen, Josef D Järhult
Urbanization is intensifying worldwide, and affects the epidemiology of infectious diseases. However, the effect of urbanization on natural host-pathogen systems remains poorly understood. Urban ducks occupy an interesting niche in that they directly interact with both humans and wild migratory birds, and either directly or indirectly with food production birds. Here we have collected samples from Mallards residing in a pond in central Uppsala, Sweden, from January 2013 to January 2014. This artificial pond is kept ice-free during the winter months, and is a popular location where the ducks are fed, resulting in a resident population of ducks year-round...
March 17, 2017: Infection, Genetics and Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28322209/complex-interactive-effects-of-water-mold-herbicide-and-the-fungus-batrachochytrium-dendrobatidis-on-pacific-treefrog-hyliola-regilla-hosts
#12
John M Romansic, James E Johnson, R Steven Wagner, Rebecca H Hill, Christopher A Gaulke, Vance T Vredenburg, Andrew R Blaustein
Infectious diseases pose a serious threat to global biodiversity. However, their ecological impacts are not independent of environmental conditions. For example, the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which has contributed to population declines and extinctions in many amphibian species, interacts with several environmental factors to influence its hosts, but potential interactions with other pathogens and environmental contaminants are understudied. We examined the combined effects of Bd, a water mold (Achlya sp...
March 21, 2017: Diseases of Aquatic Organisms
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28320440/ecological-niche-modeling-of-rabies-in-the-changing-arctic-of-alaska
#13
Falk Huettmann, Emily Elizabeth Magnuson, Karsten Hueffer
BACKGROUND: Rabies is a disease of global significance including in the circumpolar Arctic. In Alaska enzootic rabies persist in northern and western coastal areas. Only sporadic cases have occurred in areas outside of the regions considered enzootic for the virus, such as the interior of the state and urbanized regions. RESULTS: Here we examine the distribution of diagnosed rabies cases in Alaska, explicit in space and time. We use a geographic information system (GIS), 20 environmental data layers and provide a quantitative non-parsimonious estimate of the predicted ecological niche, based on data mining, machine learning and open access data...
March 20, 2017: Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28319653/the-ecology-of-human-microbiota-dynamics-and-diversity-in-health-and-disease
#14
Antti Karkman, Jenni Lehtimäki, Lasse Ruokolainen
Social welfare, better health care, and urbanization have greatly improved human health and well-being. On the other hand, Western societies suffer from the downsides of the elevated standard of living. Among other factors, the Western diet (poor in dietary fiber), lack of contact with natural biodiversity, and excessive antibiotic use are known to be associated with the increase in chronic inflammatory disorders. Limited exposure to microbial biodiversity, in combination with severe lifestyle-related disturbances to commensal microbial communities, especially during early life, is changing the diversity and composition of human microbiota...
March 20, 2017: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28318769/impact-of-meningococcal-c-conjugate-vaccination-four-years-after-introduction-of-routine-childhood-immunization-in-brazil
#15
Ana Lucia Andrade, Ruth Minamisava, Lisia Moura Tomich, Ana Paula Lemos, Maria Cecilia Gorla, Maria Cristina de Cunto Brandileone, Carla Madga S Domingues, Camile de Moraes, Gabriela Policena, Ana Luiza Bierrenbach
BACKGROUND: Routine infant immunization with meningococcal C conjugate (MCC) vaccination started in Brazil in November 2010, scheduled at three and five months plus a booster at 12-15months of age. No catch-up was implemented. We assessed the impact of vaccination on meningococcal C disease (MenC) four years after vaccination start in the National Immunization Program. METHODS: We performed an ecological quasi-experimental design from 2008 to 2014 using a deterministic linkage between the National Notification and the National Reference Laboratory databases for meningitis...
March 15, 2017: Vaccine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317105/the-benefits-of-coinfection-trematodes-alter-disease-outcomes-associated-with-virus-infection
#16
Vanessa P Wuerthner, Jessica Hua, Jason T Hoverman
1.Coinfections are increasingly recognized as important drivers of disease dynamics. Consequently, greater emphasis has been placed on integrating principles from community ecology with disease ecology to understand within-host interactions among parasites. Using larval amphibians and two amphibian parasites (ranaviruses and the trematode Echinoparyphium sp.), we examined the influence of coinfection on disease outcomes. 2.Our first objective was to examine how priority effects (the timing and sequence of parasite exposure) influence infection and disease outcomes in the laboratory...
March 20, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28317104/contact-and-contagion-bighorn-sheep-demographic-states-vary-in-probability-of-transmission-given-contact
#17
Kezia R Manlove, E Frances Cassirer, Raina K Plowright, Paul C Cross, Peter J Hudson
1.Understanding both contact and probability of transmission given contact are key to managing wildlife disease. However, wildlife disease research tends to focus on contact heterogeneity, in part because probability of transmission given contact is notoriously difficult to measure. Here we present a first step toward empirically investigating probability of transmission given contact in free-ranging wildlife. 2.We used measured contact networks to test whether bighorn sheep demographic states vary systematically in infectiousness or susceptibility to Mycoplasma ovipneumoniae, an agent responsible for bighorn sheep pneumonia...
March 20, 2017: Journal of Animal Ecology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28316380/integrated-parasite-management-with-special-reference-to-gastro-intestinal-nematodes
#18
REVIEW
I Maqbool, Z A Wani, R A Shahardar, I M Allaie, M M Shah
Domestic animals are susceptible to a large number of parasitic diseases, which lead to severe economic losses to livestock industry. So, it is necessary to control parasitic infections in these animals. Control of these helminths is undertaken mostly by anthelmintics, but because of their widespread use there is development of resistance across the globe. However, total dependence on a single method of control has proved to be non-sustainable and cost ineffective in the long term. A combination of treatment and management is necessary to control parasitism so that it will not cause further economic losses to producer as well as to livestock industry...
March 2017: Journal of Parasitic Diseases: Official Organ of the Indian Society for Parasitology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28315955/symbiosis-with-systemic-fungal-endophytes-promotes-host-escape-from-vector-borne-disease
#19
L I Perez, P E Gundel, H J Marrero, A González Arzac, M Omacini
Plants interact with a myriad of microorganisms that modulate their interactions within the community. A well-described example is the symbiosis between grasses and Epichloë fungal endophytes that protects host plants from herbivores. It is suggested that these symbionts could play a protective role for plants against pathogens through the regulation of their growth and development and/or the induction of host defences. However, other endophyte-mediated ecological mechanisms involved in disease avoidance have been scarcely explored...
March 18, 2017: Oecologia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28315039/ecology-and-feeding-habits-drive-infection-of-water-bugs-with-mycobacterium-ulcerans
#20
Solange Meyin A Ebong, Gabriel E García-Peña, Dominique Pluot-Sigwalt, Laurent Marsollier, Philippe Le Gall, Sara Eyangoh, Jean-François Guégan
Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU), the causative agent of Buruli ulcer, is present in a wide spectrum of environments, including terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems in tropical regions. The most promising studies on the epidemiological risk of this disease suggest that some ecological settings may favor infection of animals with MU including human. A species' needs and impacts on resources and the environment, i.e., its ecological niche, may influence its susceptibility to be infected by this microbial form. For example, some Naucoridae may dive in fresh waters to prey upon infected animals and thus may get infected with MU...
March 17, 2017: EcoHealth
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