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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27921293/coloniality-and-migration-are-related-to-selection-on-mhc-genes-in-birds
#1
Piotr Minias, Linda A Whittingham, Peter O Dunn
The Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) plays a key role in pathogen recognition as a part of vertebrate adaptive immune system. The great diversity of MHC genes in natural populations is maintained by different forms of balancing selection and its strength should correlate with the diversity of pathogens to which a population is exposed and the rate of exposure. Despite this prediction, little is known about how the life-history characteristics affect selection at the MHC. Here, we examined whether the strength of balancing selection on MHC class II genes in birds (as measured with nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions, dN) was related to their social or migratory behaviour, two life-history characteristics correlated with pathogen exposure...
December 6, 2016: Evolution; International Journal of Organic Evolution
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920388/human-drivers-of-ecological-and-evolutionary-dynamics-in-emerging-and-disappearing-infectious-disease-systems
#2
REVIEW
Mary A Rogalski, Camden D Gowler, Clara L Shaw, Ruth A Hufbauer, Meghan A Duffy
Humans have contributed to the increased frequency and severity of emerging infectious diseases, which pose a significant threat to wild and domestic species, as well as human health. This review examines major pathways by which humans influence parasitism by altering (co)evolutionary interactions between hosts and parasites on ecological timescales. There is still much to learn about these interactions, but a few well-studied cases show that humans influence disease emergence every step of the way. Human actions significantly increase dispersal of host, parasite and vector species, enabling greater frequency of infection in naive host populations and host switches...
January 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920387/adaptive-capabilities-and-fitness-consequences-associated-with-pollution-exposure-in-fish
#3
REVIEW
Patrick B Hamilton, Gregor Rolshausen, Tamsyn M Uren Webster, Charles R Tyler
Many fish populations are exposed to harmful levels of chemical pollution and selection pressures associated with these exposures have led to the evolution of tolerance. Our understanding of the physiological basis for these adaptations is limited, but they are likely to include processes involved with the absorption, distribution, metabolism and/or excretion of the target chemical. Other potential adaptive mechanisms include enhancements in antioxidant responses, an increased capacity for DNA and/or tissue repair and alterations to the life cycle of fish that enable earlier reproduction...
January 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920381/harvest-induced-evolution-insights-from-aquatic-and-terrestrial-systems
#4
REVIEW
Anna Kuparinen, Marco Festa-Bianchet
Commercial and recreational harvests create selection pressures for fitness-related phenotypic traits that are partly under genetic control. Consequently, harvesting can drive evolution in targeted traits. However, the quantification of harvest-induced evolutionary life history and phenotypic changes is challenging, because both density-dependent feedback and environmental changes may also affect these changes through phenotypic plasticity. Here, we synthesize current knowledge and uncertainties on six key points: (i) whether or not harvest-induced evolution is happening, (ii) whether or not it is beneficial, (iii) how it shapes biological systems, (iv) how it could be avoided, (v) its importance relative to other drivers of phenotypic changes, and (vi) whether or not it should be explicitly accounted for in management...
January 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920379/domestication-impacts-on-plant-herbivore-interactions-a-meta-analysis
#5
Susan R Whitehead, Martin M Turcotte, Katja Poveda
For millennia, humans have imposed strong selection on domesticated crops, resulting in drastically altered crop phenotypes compared with wild ancestors. Crop yields have increased, but a long-held hypothesis is that domestication has also unintentionally decreased plant defences against herbivores. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a phylogenetically controlled meta-analysis comparing insect herbivore resistance and putative plant defence traits between crops and their wild relatives. Our database included 2098 comparisons made across 73 crops in 89 studies...
January 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920374/urban-driven-phenotypic-changes-empirical-observations-and-theoretical-implications-for-eco-evolutionary-feedback
#6
REVIEW
Marina Alberti, John Marzluff, Victoria M Hunt
Emerging evidence that cities drive micro-evolution raises the question of whether rapid urbanization of Earth might impact ecosystems by causing systemic changes in functional traits that regulate urban ecosystems' productivity and stability. Intraspecific trait variation-variation in organisms' morphological, physiological or behavioural characteristics stemming from genetic variability and phenotypic plasticity-has significant implications for ecological functions such as nutrient cycling and primary productivity...
January 19, 2017: Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society of London. Series B, Biological Sciences
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27920349/factors-associated-with-physical-activity-in-latina-women-a-systematic-review
#7
Marlene Tovar, Janiece L Walker, Lynn Rew
The purpose of this systemic literature review is to unveil a greater understanding of Physical Activity in Latinas. We used PubMed and PsycInfo databases to search for articles published between 1991 and August 2016, examining physical activity and its correlates exclusively in adult Latinas. Only 21 primary studies met the inclusion criteria. Although physical activity derives from body movements in various domains, the leisure domain led the focus of research interest. The use of self-reports, cross-sectional design, and the ecological framework predominated...
December 5, 2016: Western Journal of Nursing Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27919551/defining-the-core-microbiome-in-corals-microbial-soup
#8
REVIEW
Alejandra Hernandez-Agreda, Ruth D Gates, Tracy D Ainsworth
Corals are considered one of the most complex microbial biospheres studied to date, hosting thousands of bacterial phylotypes in species-specific associations. There are, however, substantial knowledge gaps and challenges in understanding the functional significance of bacterial communities and bacterial symbioses of corals. The ubiquitous nature of some bacterial interactions has only recently been investigated and an accurate differentiation between the healthy (symbiotic) and unhealthy (dysbiotic) microbial state has not yet been determined...
December 2, 2016: Trends in Microbiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27918941/emergence-of-plant-vascular-system-roles-of-hormonal-and-non-hormonal-regulatory-networks
#9
REVIEW
Hyunwoo Cho, Tuong Vi T Dang, Ildoo Hwang
The divergence of land plants followed by vascular plants has entirely changed the terrestrial ecology. The vascular system is a prerequisite for this evolutionary event, providing upright stature and communication for sink demand-source capacity and facilitating the development of plants and colonization over a wide range of environmental habitats. Various hormonal and non-hormonal regulatory networks have been identified and reviewed as key processes for vascular formation; however, how these factors have evolutionarily emerged and interconnected to trigger the emergence of the vascular system still remains elusive...
December 2, 2016: Current Opinion in Plant Biology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917987/the-future-of-pastoralism-an-introduction
#10
J Zinsstag, E Schelling, B Bonfoh, L Crump, S KrÄtli
Two-thirds of the agricultural land on planet Earth is grassland on which no other crops can be grown, either because of limited rainfall, high altitude or mountainous conditions. Most of these semi-arid and high-altitude pastoral ecosystems are used by livestock husbandry systems with various forms of mobility and are not in competition with crop production for human nutrition. By devoting an issue of its Scientific and Technical Review to pastoralism, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) is encouraging debate on this important topic and helping to shape the future of pastoralists and their livestock...
November 2016: Revue Scientifique et Technique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917979/ecology-mobility-and-labour-dynamic-pastoral-herd-management-in-an-uncertain-world
#11
B Butt
In this review, the author discusses how pastoralism, and its many constituent components, is increasingly being recognised as in tune with the changing political and ecological nature of rangelands. He describes ways in which the literature reflects this changing attitude, outlines how rangelands respond to changes in climate and explores the evolving use of livestock resources. In addition, he describes the growing recognition of factors other than livestock density that affect rangeland vegetation (i.e. density-independent relationships)...
November 2016: Revue Scientifique et Technique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917977/discontinuity-in-pastoral-development-time-to-update-the-method
#12
S KrÄtli
Most off-the-shelf basic methodological tools currently used in pastoral development (e.g. technical definitions and conventional scales of observation) retain underlying assumptions about stability and uniformity being the norm (i.e. 'equilibrium thinking'). Such assumptions reflect a theoretical framework which had been questioned since the 1970s and was openly disproved in scientific circles during the 1990s, when it was shown to be fundamentally inadequate. Today, lingering equilibrium assumptions in the methodological legacy of pastoral development get in the way of operationalising state-of-the-art understanding of pastoral systems and drylands...
November 2016: Revue Scientifique et Technique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917974/the-chinese-perspective-on-pastoral-resource-economics-a-vision-of-the-future-in-a-context-of-socio-ecological-vulnerability
#13
L Yu, K N Farrell
This paper reviews institutional changes in pastureland use in China over the last 30 years and discusses their impacts on pastoral communities, drawing evidence from case studies of two agro-pastoralist and two pastoralist communities. Those who rely directly on pastureland for their livelihood are vulnerable to the joint effects of pastureland degradation and climate change. The authors argue that a 'top-down' governance structure with no participation from local communities and a 'one size fits all' institutional solution are a poor fit for pastoralism management...
November 2016: Revue Scientifique et Technique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917971/pastoralism-in-europe-characteristics-and-challenges-of-highland-lowland-transhumance
#14
K Liechti, J-P Biber
Transhumant pastoralism remains a prevalent form of land use across Europe, especially in mountain areas. Besides generating food and other products, it provides a range of public goods and services that are often highly valued by broader society. But transhumance faces structural challenges associated with life in remote mountain areas, including economic pressures, lack of services, low prestige, and ageing populations. These threaten its future. The decline of transhumant systems leads to ecological, economic, and socio-cultural losses, e...
November 2016: Revue Scientifique et Technique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917967/innovations-and-diverse-livelihood-pathways-alternative-livelihoods-livelihood-diversification-and-societal-transformation-in-pastoral-communities
#15
I Köhler-Rollefson
Pastoralists have a rich tradition of 'innovation', as continuous adaptation to new ecological and economic scenarios has been a prerequisite for their survival through the millennia. One of their greatest assets is the large number of locally adapted livestock breeds they have developed, which represent a major resource for climate change adaptation as well as mitigation. Pastoralists are beginning to position themselves as providers of ecological services as well as of livestock products that represent a healthy and eco-friendly alternative to the products from industrial production systems...
November 2016: Revue Scientifique et Technique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917966/enabling-sustainable-pastoralism-policies-and-investments-that-optimise-livestock-production-and-rangeland-stewardship
#16
R Ouedraogo, J Davies
Pastoralism is a system of dynamically managing livestock and land for economic, social and environmental benefit. To a large extent, pastoralism is an adaptation to ecological and climatic variability and is not simply a livestock production system but provides significant environmental services to humanity. Evidence from a range of national contexts shows that sustainable pastoralist development requires an understanding of the dual environmental and economic roles of pastoralism and an adaptation of policies and investments to support both...
November 2016: Revue Scientifique et Technique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917964/communication-for-the-development-of-pastoralism
#17
M A Seid, L W Yoseph, U W Befekadu, A Muhammed, T Z Fikre
Communication is vital for the socio-economic and cultural development of pastoralists. If used constructively, communication can help to create a favourable environment for change and modernisation. This paper tries to uncover trends in communication as part of pastoral development, emphasising both indigenous and current methods of communication and prevailing constraints. This study reveals that pastoral development interventions in the past have often failed to achieve their goals, due to the centralised, 'top-down' approaches adopted and to reliance on external strategies and channels which ignored the indigenous knowledge and communications systems of pastoralists...
November 2016: Revue Scientifique et Technique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27917960/a-vision-for-the-future-of-pastoralism
#18
J Zinsstag, B Bonfoh, G Zinsstag, L Crump, I O Alfaroukh, M F Abakar, J Kasymbekov, Z Baljinnyam, K Liechti, M A Seid, E Schelling
Pastoral regions are challenged by social and ecological changes. Yet, there is increasingly robust evidence that pastoralism is a viable and sustainable livelihood and that pastoralists play a role in attaining the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). In this issue of the Scientific and Technical Review of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), the authors take a broad view of pastoralism and pastoral livestock production from a number of different perspectives, taking into account societal and ecological viewpoints as well as issues of animal and human health...
November 2016: Revue Scientifique et Technique
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27916820/biological-control-beneath-the-feet-a-review-of-crop-protection-against-insect-root-herbivores
#19
REVIEW
Alan Kergunteuil, Moe Bakhtiari, Ludovico Formenti, Zhenggao Xiao, Emmanuel Defossez, Sergio Rasmann
Sustainable agriculture is certainly one of the most important challenges at present, considering both human population demography and evidence showing that crop productivity based on chemical control is plateauing. While the environmental and health threats of conventional agriculture are increasing, ecological research is offering promising solutions for crop protection against herbivore pests. While most research has focused on aboveground systems, several major crop pests are uniquely feeding on roots. We here aim at documenting the current and potential use of several biological control agents, including micro-organisms (viruses, bacteria, fungi, and nematodes) and invertebrates included among the macrofauna of soils (arthropods and annelids) that are used against root herbivores...
November 29, 2016: Insects
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27915391/is-the-macrophyte-diversification-along-the-trophic-gradient-distinct-enough-for-river-monitoring
#20
Krzysztof Szoszkiewicz, Anna Budka, Karol Pietruczuk, Dariusz Kayzer, Daniel Gebler
The variation of a number of parameters characterizing aquatic plant assemblages in rivers across a wide trophic gradient was investigated to evaluate their usefulness for a Polish national river monitoring system. Analyses were conducted at 100 sites included in the national river monitoring system, representing a uniform river type, i.e., small- and medium-sized lowland rivers with a sandy substrate. Results of botanical surveys, which were supplemented with comprehensive monthly quality records, were obtained from the national monitoring database...
December 2016: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
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