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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29237590/nativity-status-and-cardiovascular-disease-mortality-among-hispanic-adults
#1
Fatima Rodriguez, Katherine G Hastings, Jiaqi Hu, Lenny Lopez, Mark Cullen, Robert A Harrington, Latha P Palaniappan
BACKGROUND: Hispanic persons represent a heterogeneous and growing population of any race with origins in Mexico, the Caribbean, Central America, South America, or other Spanish-speaking countries. Previous studies have documented variation in cardiovascular risk and outcomes among Hispanic subgroups. Few studies have investigated whether these patterns vary by nativity status among Hispanic subgroups. METHODS AND RESULTS: We used the National Center for Health Statistics mortality file to compare deaths of Hispanic (n=1 258 229) and non-Hispanic white (n=18 149 774) adults (aged ≥25 years) from 2003 to 2012...
December 13, 2017: Journal of the American Heart Association
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29219353/measurement-of-the-d-2010-d-mass-difference
#2
J P Lees, V Poireau, V Tisserand, E Grauges, A Palano, G Eigen, D N Brown, Yu G Kolomensky, M Fritsch, H Koch, T Schroeder, C Hearty, T S Mattison, J A McKenna, R Y So, V E Blinov, A R Buzykaev, V P Druzhinin, V B Golubev, E A Kravchenko, A P Onuchin, S I Serednyakov, Yu I Skovpen, E P Solodov, K Yu Todyshev, A J Lankford, J W Gary, O Long, A M Eisner, W S Lockman, W Panduro Vazquez, D S Chao, C H Cheng, B Echenard, K T Flood, D G Hitlin, J Kim, T S Miyashita, P Ongmongkolkul, F C Porter, M Röhrken, Z Huard, B T Meadows, B G Pushpawela, M D Sokoloff, J G Smith, S R Wagner, D Bernard, M Verderi, D Bettoni, C Bozzi, R Calabrese, G Cibinetto, E Fioravanti, I Garzia, E Luppi, V Santoro, A Calcaterra, R de Sangro, G Finocchiaro, S Martellotti, P Patteri, I M Peruzzi, M Piccolo, M Rotondo, A Zallo, S Passaggio, C Patrignani, H M Lacker, B Bhuyan, U Mallik, C Chen, J Cochran, S Prell, H Ahmed, A V Gritsan, N Arnaud, M Davier, F Le Diberder, A M Lutz, G Wormser, D J Lange, D M Wright, J P Coleman, E Gabathuler, D E Hutchcroft, D J Payne, C Touramanis, A J Bevan, F Di Lodovico, R Sacco, G Cowan, Sw Banerjee, D N Brown, C L Davis, A G Denig, W Gradl, K Griessinger, A Hafner, K R Schubert, R J Barlow, G D Lafferty, R Cenci, A Jawahery, D A Roberts, R Cowan, S H Robertson, B Dey, N Neri, F Palombo, R Cheaib, L Cremaldi, R Godang, D J Summers, P Taras, G De Nardo, C Sciacca, G Raven, C P Jessop, J M LoSecco, K Honscheid, R Kass, A Gaz, M Margoni, M Posocco, G Simi, F Simonetto, R Stroili, S Akar, E Ben-Haim, M Bomben, G R Bonneaud, G Calderini, J Chauveau, G Marchiori, J Ocariz, M Biasini, E Manoni, A Rossi, G Batignani, S Bettarini, M Carpinelli, G Casarosa, M Chrzaszcz, F Forti, M A Giorgi, A Lusiani, B Oberhof, E Paoloni, M Rama, G Rizzo, J J Walsh, A J S Smith, F Anulli, R Faccini, F Ferrarotto, F Ferroni, A Pilloni, G Piredda, C Bünger, S Dittrich, O Grünberg, M Heß, T Leddig, C Voß, R Waldi, T Adye, F F Wilson, S Emery, G Vasseur, D Aston, C Cartaro, M R Convery, J Dorfan, W Dunwoodie, M Ebert, R C Field, B G Fulsom, M T Graham, C Hast, W R Innes, P Kim, D W G S Leith, S Luitz, D B MacFarlane, D R Muller, H Neal, B N Ratcliff, A Roodman, M K Sullivan, J Va'vra, W J Wisniewski, M V Purohit, J R Wilson, A Randle-Conde, S J Sekula, M Bellis, P R Burchat, E M T Puccio, M S Alam, J A Ernst, R Gorodeisky, N Guttman, D R Peimer, A Soffer, S M Spanier, J L Ritchie, R F Schwitters, J M Izen, X C Lou, F Bianchi, F De Mori, A Filippi, D Gamba, L Lanceri, L Vitale, F Martinez-Vidal, A Oyanguren, J Albert, A Beaulieu, F U Bernlochner, G J King, R Kowalewski, T Lueck, I M Nugent, J M Roney, R J Sobie, N Tasneem, T J Gershon, P F Harrison, T E Latham, R Prepost, S L Wu, L Sun
We measure the mass difference, Δm_{+}, between the D^{*}(2010)^{+} and the D^{+} using the decay chain D^{*}(2010)^{+}→D^{+}π^{0} with D^{+}→K^{-}π^{+}π^{+}. The data were recorded with the BABAR detector at center-of-mass energies at and near the ϒ(4S) resonance, and correspond to an integrated luminosity of approximately 468  fb^{-1}. We measure Δm_{+}=(140 601.0±6.8[stat]±12.9[syst])  keV. We combine this result with a previous BABAR measurement of Δm_{0}≡m(D^{*}(2010)^{+})-m(D^{0}) to obtain Δm_{D}=m(D^{+})-m(D^{0})=(4824...
November 17, 2017: Physical Review Letters
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29171894/the-future-of-reproductive-autonomy
#3
Josephine Johnston, Rachel L Zacharias
In a project The Hastings Center is now running on the future of prenatal testing, we are encountering clear examples, both in established law and in the practices of individual providers, of failures to respect women's reproductive autonomy: when testing is not offered to certain demographics of women, for instance, or when the choices of women to terminate or continue pregnancies are prohibited or otherwise not supported. But this project also raises puzzles for reproductive autonomy. We have learned that some clinicians and patients do not discuss the fact that prenatal testing can lead to a decision about whether to terminate a pregnancy-they just don't talk about it...
December 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29171885/about-the-hastings-center
#4
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29171884/autonomy-in-tension-reproduction-technology-and-justice
#5
Louise P King, Rachel L Zacharias, Josephine Johnston
Respect for autonomy is a central value in reproductive ethics, but it can be a challenge to fulfill and is sometimes an outright puzzle to understand. If a woman requests the transfer of two, three, or four embryos during fertility treatment, is that request truly autonomous, and do clinicians disrespect her if they question that decision or refuse to carry it out? Add a commitment to justice to the mix, and the challenge can become more complex still. Is it unfair for insurance policies to exclude from coverage the costs of giving fertility to those who lack it or restoring fertility in those who have lost it? What does "just reproduction" look like in the face of multifarious understandings of both justice and autonomy and in light of increasingly complex and costly reproductive technologies? In today's dialogue about reproduction, medicine, and ethics in the United States, old ethical issues-such as whether women ought to be allowed to access pregnancy termination-are more contested than they have been in decades, while new technologies-like those used to edit the genes of human embryos-suggest that our species could face unprecedented questions about who should exist...
December 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29171055/global-bioethics
#6
Carolyn P Neuhaus
This August, I participated in the conference "Genome Editing: Biomedical and Ethical Perspectives," hosted by the Center for the Study of Bioethics at the University of Belgrade and cosponsored by the Division of Medical Ethics of NYU Langone Health and The Hastings Center. The prime minister of Serbia, Ana Brnabić, spoke of the significance of bringing together an international community of bioethicists, acknowledging that ethical, social, and legal issues surrounding gene editing technologies transcend national boundaries...
November 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29171054/the-sticky-standard-of-care
#7
Michelle Oberman
The problem at the heart of "Stemming the Standard-of-Care Sprawl: Clinician Self-Interest and the Case of Electronic Fetal Monitoring," an article by Kayte Spector-Bagdady and colleagues in the November-December 2017 issue of the Hastings Center Report, is the persistence of a suboptimal standard of care long after evidence-driven approaches would dictate a change. That problem is not simply defensive medicine, or what the authors call "standard-of-care sprawl." Instead, it is that, in some cases, the standard of care lags behind best practices...
November 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29171052/social-practices
#8
(no author information available yet)
In one way or another, several pieces in the November-December 2017 of the Hastings Center Report reflect an insistence on turning away from abstractions to learn how a whole community understands a problem at issue-how a community understands what's at stake in individuals' autonomous choices, how a community understands the results of a clinical trial, how a community understands, and generates and adjusts, medical standards. In the lead article, Kayte Spector-Bagdady and colleagues argue that, given extensive research showing that electronic fetal monitoring during childbirth offers very little benefit to the mother and child, a mechanism is needed to ensure that the medical standard of care is based on the right kinds of considerations...
November 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29016178/jerome-s-bruner-1915-2016
#9
Helen Haste, Howard Gardner
Presents an obituary for Jerome S. Bruner, who died in 2016. His long, and productive, life spanned much of the first century of experimental psychology and coincided with the launching of cognitive psychology, a field in which he played an indispensable and pioneering role. His innovative and provocative work constantly challenged the current "mainstream." His impact on education has been equated with that of John Dewey. He was driven throughout his life to pursue the nature of the "human" in both his conceptual and empirical work...
October 2017: American Psychologist
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28940350/urgently-creating-the-better-in-global-health
#10
Richard Marlink
In this issue of the Hastings Center Report, Govind Persad and Ezekiel Emanuel argue that "[t]he provision of cheaper, less effective health care is frequently the most effective way of promoting health and realizing the ethical values of utility, equality, and priority to the worst off." I agree that we should not let the perfect get in the way of the good, but just providing cheaper, less effective treatment for utilitarian or other reasons is not a comprehensive approach to global health. In my experience as an on-the-ground global health practitioner, the choice is never that simple...
September 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28940347/field-notes
#11
(no author information available yet)
I live in Newburgh, New York, a city of thirty thousand a short drive from the Hastings Center's Garrison campus. In 2016, residents were informed that our drinking water contained elevated levels of perfluorooctane sulfonate, a chemical the Environmental Protection Agency calls an "emerging contaminant of concern." The contaminant's long-term health effects are poorly understood: it might cause cancer, or birth defects, or thyroid issues, or it might not. Newburgh's water contamination is a problem that is both mine and not mine...
September 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28940344/standards-of-care-in-global-health-identifying-the-right-question
#12
Paul Ndebele
Govind Persad and Ezekiel Emanuel's article "The Case for Resource Sensitivity: Why It Is Ethical to Provide Cheaper, Less Effective Treatments in Global Health," in this issue of the Hastings Center Report, is a reminder of the debates around resources for health care that raged during the years immediately preceding and following the fifth revision of the Declaration of Helsinki, in 2000. In global health, it is a common expectation for rich countries to assist poor countries in resolving health challenges, yet global health involves not only the governments of rich and poor nations but also nongovernmental organizations, pharmaceutical companies, the World Health Organization, philanthropic organizations, and other parties-all of whom take roles in ensuring that health interventions become available to poor countries, including deciding which types of interventions to make available...
September 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28940339/rough-justice
#13
(no author information available yet)
In the Perspective in this issue of the Hastings Center Report (September-October 2017), Barron Lerner contrasts the "true believers" in public health schools-"people willing to crusade for any program designed to reduce morbidity and mortality"-and the political operators in the "real world" who often stand in their way. Lerner takes us through some of those programs, both past efforts that were successful and widely accepted and current endeavors that look promising but face all sorts of obstacles. Keep the faith, he admonishes...
September 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28930977/fourier-based-diffraction-analysis-of-live-caenorhabditis-elegans
#14
Jenny Magnes, Harold M Hastings, Kathleen M Raley-Susman, Clara Alivisatos, Adam Warner, Miranda Hulsey-Vincent
This manuscript describes how to classify nematodes using temporal far-field diffraction signatures. A single C. elegans is suspended in a water column inside an optical cuvette. A 632 nm continuous wave HeNe laser is directed through the cuvette using front surface mirrors. A significant distance of at least 20-30 cm traveled after the light passes through the cuvette ensures a useful far-field (Fraunhofer) diffraction pattern. The diffraction pattern changes in real time as the nematode swims within the laser beam...
September 13, 2017: Journal of Visualized Experiments: JoVE
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28870480/propofol-sedation-substantially-increases-the-caloric-and-lipid-intake-in-critically-ill-patients
#15
Mélanie Charrière, Emma Ridley, Jennifer Hastings, Oliver Bianchet, Carlos Scheinkestel, Mette M Berger
OBJECTIVE: The amount of lipid delivered to patients varies considerably depending on the non-nutritional intake from sedation, and on the feeding solution. The aim of this study was to quantify the magnitude and proportion of lipids and energy provided from propofol sedation in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. METHODS: This was a retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data in consecutive patients admitted to the ICUs of two university hospitals. Inclusion criterion included an ICU stay >5 d...
October 2017: Nutrition
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28814630/inverted-region-electron-transfer-as-a-mechanism-for-enhancing-photosynthetic-solar-energy-conversion-efficiency
#16
Hiroki Makita, Gary Hastings
In all photosynthetic organisms, light energy is used to drive electrons from a donor chlorophyll species via a series of acceptors across a biological membrane. These light-induced electron-transfer processes display a remarkably high quantum efficiency, indicating a near-complete inhibition of unproductive charge recombination reactions. It has been suggested that unproductive charge recombination could be inhibited if the reaction occurs in the so-called inverted region. However, inverted-region electron transfer has never been demonstrated in any native photosynthetic system...
August 29, 2017: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28749059/expanding-the-horizon-of-our-obligations-in-the-clinician-patient-relationship
#17
Robert D Truog
Johan Brännmark's article "Patients as Rights Holders," in this issue of the Hastings Center Report, squarely identifies some important problems with the way we in clinical practice conceive of our obligations to our patients. As a solution, he helpfully suggests augmenting our focus on autonomy and informed consent with a broader menu of considerations drawn from the literature on human rights. Respect for autonomy is, of course, one of the hallowed principles of bioethics. In our traditional understanding, our patients deserve our respect because they are capable of autonomous choice, and the way we demonstrate our respect is by seeking their informed consent for our care...
July 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28749058/conservationism-and-bioethic
#18
EDITORIAL
Gregory E Kaebnick
The lead article in this issue of the Hastings Center Report (July-August 2017) explores the ideas underpinning the Precision Medicine Initiative, the effort announced by President Obama in 2015 to promote the development of treatments adjusted to genetic and other variations. Authors Maya Sabatello and Paul Appelbaum hold that the effort works by appealing to a sense of collective identity and shared commitment-an understanding that they call the "PMI nation." But what are the moral implications of this idea? Sabatello and Appelbaum's question about the impact of an imagined community is an unusual way of exploring a set of values questions...
July 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28749051/genomic-justice-and-imagined-communities
#19
Ernesto Schwartz-Marin
In this issue of the Hastings Center Report, Maya Sabatello and Paul Appelbaum explore the assumptions about community embedded in the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative, which aims to recruit donor-partners who reflect the United States' racial and ethnic diversity. As Sabatello and Appelbaum discuss, the initiative is like other national biobanking efforts in bringing to life an imagined genetic community in need of critical attention, and given the public-private forms of partnership at the heart of the PMI, such efforts could become avenues to deepen existing inequalities rather than to alleviate them...
July 2017: Hastings Center Report
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28746758/about-the-hastings-center
#20
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Hastings Center Report
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