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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28546373/noninvasive-respiratory-support-in-infants-and-children
#1
Katherine L Fedor
CPAP and noninvasive ventilation (NIV) offer an alternative to intubation and mechanical ventilation in the treatment of acute and chronic respiratory disorders commonly encountered in infants and children. There are many distinct challenges associated with the application, management, and safety of CPAP and NIV in the pediatric population. This review attempts to identify indications, contraindications, management strategies, and safety measures associated with the application of CPAP or NIV delivery in children...
June 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28545875/regional-volume-characteristics-of-the-preterm-infant-receiving-first-intention-continuous-positive-airway-pressure
#2
Risha Bhatia, Peter G Davis, David G Tingay
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether applying nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) using systematic changes in continuous distending pressure (CDP) results in a quasi-static pressure-volume relationship in very preterm infants receiving first intention CPAP in the first 12-18 hours of life. STUDY DESIGN: Twenty infants at <32 weeks' gestation with mild respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) managed exclusively with nasal CPAP had CDP increased from 5 to 8 to 10 cmH2O, and then decreased to 8 cmH2O and returned to baseline CDP...
May 22, 2017: Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544812/acute-impact-of-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-on-nasal-patency
#3
Leonardo Balsalobre, Rogério Pezato, Hiran Gasparini, Fernanda Haddad, Luis Carlos Gregório, Reginaldo R Fujita
BACKGROUND: Continuous airflow in the upper airway can cause discomfort, leading to nasopharyngeal complaints. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the acute effects of continuous positive upper-airway pressure on nasal patency in awake normal subjects. METHODS: Twenty-seven adults (17 men; 10 women; age range, 18 to 43 years) were exposed to continuous airway pressure (20 cmH2 O) in the nasal cavity, delivered by a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device through a nasal mask for 2 hours...
May 23, 2017: International Forum of Allergy & Rhinology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28544539/intensive-care-unit-admissions-and-ventilation-support-in-infants-with-bronchiolitis
#4
Ed Oakley, Vi Chong, Meredith Borland, Jocelyn Neutze, Natalie Phillips, David Krieser, Stuart Dalziel, Andrew Davidson, Susan Donath, Kim Jachno, Mike South, Amanda Fry, Franz E Babl
OBJECTIVES: To describe the rate of intensive care unit (ICU) admission, type of ventilation support provided and risk factors for ICU admission in infants with bronchiolitis. DESIGN: Retrospective review of hospital records and Australia and New Zealand Paediatric Intensive Care (ANZPIC) registry data for infants 2-12 months old admitted with bronchiolitis. SETTING: Seven Australian and New Zealand hospitals. These infants were prospectively identified through the comparative rehydration in bronchiolitis (CRIB) study between 2009 and 2011...
May 19, 2017: Emergency Medicine Australasia: EMA
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28538774/influence-of-the-ventilatory-mode-on-acute-adverse-effects-and-facial-thermography-after-noninvasive-ventilation
#5
Suzy Maria Montenegro Pontes, Luiz Henrique de Paula Melo, Nathalia Parente de Sousa Maia, Andrea da Nóbrega Cirino Nogueira, Thiago Brasileiro Vasconcelos, Eanes Delgado Barros Pereira, Vasco Pinheiro Diógenes Bastos, Marcelo Alcantara Holanda
Objective: To compare the incidence and intensity of acute adverse effects and the variation in the temperature of facial skin by thermography after the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV). Methods: We included 20 healthy volunteers receiving NIV via oronasal mask for 1 h. The volunteers were randomly divided into two groups according to the ventilatory mode: bilevel positive airway pressure (BiPAP) or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Facial thermography was performed in order to determine the temperature of the face where it was in contact with the mask and of the nasal dorsum at various time points...
March 2017: Jornal Brasileiro de Pneumologia: Publicaça̋o Oficial da Sociedade Brasileira de Pneumologia e Tisilogia
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28504355/home-high-flow-nasal-cannula-as-a-treatment-for-severe-tracheomalacia-a-pediatric-case-report
#6
Kevin Vézina, Sophie Laberge, The Thanh Diem Nguyen
Tracheomalacia refers to a softness of the tracheal cartilage that makes the airway more susceptible to collapse. In contrast to milder cases where conservative therapy is preferred, severe tracheomalacia is often a life threatening condition requiring more aggressive management. For children with this condition, a variety of treatment options are available. To our knowledge, this is the first report of home high-flow nasal cannula as an alternative therapy to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and surgical procedures in a pediatric patient with severe extensive tracheomalacia...
May 15, 2017: Pediatric Pulmonology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28495265/continuous-positive-airway-pressure-for-children-with-undifferentiated-respiratory-distress-in-ghana-an-open-label-cluster-crossover-trial
#7
Patrick T Wilson, Frank Baiden, Joshua C Brooks, Marilyn C Morris, Katie Giessler, Damien Punguyire, Gavin Apio, Akua Agyeman-Ampromfi, Sara Lopez-Pintado, Justice Sylverken, Kwadwo Nyarko-Jectey, Harry Tagbor, Rachel T Moresky
BACKGROUND: In low-income and middle-income countries, invasive mechanical ventilation is often not available for children at risk of death from respiratory failure. We aimed to determine if continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), a form of non-invasive ventilation, decreases all-cause mortality in children with undifferentiated respiratory distress in Ghana. METHODS: This open-label, cluster, crossover trial was done in two Ghanaian non-tertiary hospitals where invasive mechanical ventilation is not routinely available...
June 2017: Lancet Global Health
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28493047/effects-of-cpap-in-patients-with-obstructive-apnoea-is-the-presence-of-allergic-rhinitis-relevant
#8
A Cisternas, F Aguilar, J M Montserrat, M Àvila, M Torres, A Iranzo, J Berenguer, I Vilaseca
PURPOSE: The aim of the study is to compare the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the nasal cavities of patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and with or without allergic rhinitis (AR/nonAR). METHODS: This paper is a prospective, longitudinal study. Thirty-four consecutive CPAP treatment-adherent patients with OSA (17 AR and 17 nonAR) were evaluated before and 2 months after treatment, by means of clinical (otorhinolaryngological symptoms, daytime sleepiness, overall and rhinoconjunctivitis-specific quality of life), anatomical (otorhinolaryngological examination), functional (auditory function, tubal function, nasal airflow, and mucociliary clearance), and biological variables (nasal cytology)...
May 10, 2017: Sleep & Breathing, Schlaf & Atmung
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28490347/gh-secreting-pituitary-macroadenoma-acromegaly-associated-with-progressive-dental-malocclusion-and-refractory-cpap-treatment
#9
Jaume Miranda-Rius, Lluís Brunet-LLobet, Eduard Lahor-Soler, David de Dios-Miranda, Josep Anton Giménez-Rubio
BACKGROUND: A link between progressive dental malocclusion, the use of a continuous positive airway pressure mask and GH-secreting pituitary macroadenoma (acromegaly) has not been previously reported. The present clinicopathological analysis stresses that tooth malposition should not be seen exclusively as a local process. CASE PRESENTATION: A 62-year-old caucasian man with no relevant medical history reported difficulty chewing food and perceived voice alteration during his annual periodontal check-up...
May 10, 2017: Head & Face Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28489018/estimating-sleep-parameters-using-nasal-pressure-signals-applicable-to-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-cpap-devices
#10
Jong-Uk Park, Urtnasan Erdenebayar, Eun-Yeon Joo, Kyoung-Joung Lee
This paper proposes a method for classifying sleep-wakefulness and estimating sleep parameters using nasal pressure signals applicable to a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device. In order to classify the sleep-wakefulness states of patients with sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), apnea-hypopnea and snoring events are first detected. Detected epochs as SDB are classified as sleep, and time domain and frequency domain-based features are extracted from epochs that are detected as normal breathing. Subsequently, sleep-wakefulness is classified using a support vector machine (SVM) classifier in the normal breathing epoch...
May 10, 2017: Physiological Measurement
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28487415/randomized-comparison-of-helmet-cpap-versus-high-flow-nasal-cannula-oxygen-in-pediatric-respiratory-distress
#11
Giovanna Vitaliti, Maria Concetta Vitaliti, Maria Carla Finocchiaro, Vita Antonella Di Stefano, Piero Pavone, Nassim Matin, Nazgol Motamed-Gorji, Riccardo Lubrano, Raffaele Falsaperla
BACKGROUND: The current study aimed to compare the efficacy and safety of 2 noninvasive respiratory support methods, which included helmet CPAP and high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) in children with respiratory distress admitted to a pediatric intermediate care unit. METHODS: This study was a prospective observational study conducted on children with respiratory distress (age 1-24 months) who were admitted to our acute and emergency operative unit. All included subjects were randomly treated with helmet CPAP or HFNC in a 1:1 fashion until their clinical picture, oxygen saturation, and arterial blood gas (ABG) parameters resolved...
May 9, 2017: Respiratory Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28425965/comparison-of-cpap-and-hfnc-in-management-of-bronchiolitis-in-infants-and-young-children
#12
Majken Bisgaard Pedersen, Signe Vahlkvist
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been used in infants with bronchiolitis for decades. Recently, high flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy was introduced We conducted a retrospective study of treatment with CPAP vs. HFNC between 2013 and 2015, comparing the development in respiratory rate, fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) and heart rate, treatment failure, duration of treatment, and length of hospital stay. A sample size of 49 children were included. Median age was 1.9 months. Median baseline pCO₂ was 7...
April 20, 2017: Children
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28419601/is-high-flow-nasal-cannula-noninferior-to-nasal-cpap-for-the-initial-management-of-preterm-infants
#13
Megan J Kirkley, Sunah S Hwang
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 17, 2017: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28399118/feasibility-and-physiological-effects-of-non-invasive-neurally-adjusted-ventilatory-assist-niv-nava-in-preterm-infants
#14
Christopher Gibu, Phillip Cheng, Raymond J Ward, Benjamin Castro, Gregory P Heldt
BACKGROUND: Non-invasive Neurally Adjusted Ventilator Assist (NIV-NAVA) was introduced to our clinical practice via a pilot and a randomized observational study to assess its safety, feasibility, and short term physiological effects. METHODS: The pilot protocol applied NIV-NAVA to 11 infants on nasal CPAP, high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC), or nasal IMV (NIMV), in multiple 2-4 h periods of NIV-NAVA for comparison. This provided the necessary data to design a randomized, controlled observational cross-over study in 8 additional infants to compare the physiological effects of NIV-NAVA to NIMV during 2-hour steady state conditions...
April 11, 2017: Pediatric Research
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28370320/preventing-extubation-failure-in-preterm-infants-nasal-cpap-remains-the-standard-of-care
#15
Laurie G Sherlock, Clyde J Wright
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2, 2017: Acta Paediatrica
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28366356/comparison-of-effort-of-breathing-for-infants-on-nasal-modes-of-respiratory-support
#16
Asavari Kamerkar, Justin Hotz, Rica Morzov, Christopher J L Newth, Patrick A Ross, Robinder G Khemani
OBJECTIVE: To directly compare effort of breathing between high flow nasal cannula (HFNC), nasal intermittent mechanical ventilation (NIMV), and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). STUDY DESIGN: This was a single center prospective cross-over study for patients <6 months in the cardiothoracic or pediatric intensive care unit receiving nasal noninvasive respiratory support after extubation. We measured effort of breathing using esophageal manometry with pressure-rate product (PRP) on all 3 modes...
March 30, 2017: Journal of Pediatrics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28366323/effect-of-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-on-regional-cerebral-blood-flow-in-patients-with-severe-obstructive-sleep-apnea-syndrome
#17
Jeong Sik Kim, Ji Hye Seo, Mi-Ri Kang, Min Jae Seong, Won Gu Lee, Eun Yeon Joo, Seung Bong Hong
OBJECTIVES: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is commonly associated with neural and cognitive deficits induced by recurrent hypoxemia and sleep fragment. The aims of this study were to use statistical parametric mapping (SPM) to analyze changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in untreated patients with severe OSA before and after nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, examine the impact of OSA-related variables on rCBF, and assess the therapeutic effect of nasal CPAP treatment...
April 2017: Sleep Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28364453/characteristics-and-consequences-of-non-apneic-respiratory-events-during-sleep
#18
Abdulghani Sankari, Sukanya Pranathiageswaran, Scott Maresh, Arwa Mohammad Hosni, M Safwan Badr
Rationale: Current scoring criteria of non-apneic events (ie, hypopnea) require the presence of oxyhemoglobin desaturation and/or arousal. However, other sleep study parameters may help to identify abnormal respiratory events (REs) and assist in making more accurate diagnosis. Objectives: To investigate whether non-apneic REs without desaturation or cortical arousal are associated with respiratory and cardiac consequences. Methods: Thirteen participants with sleep disturbances (snoring and/or excessive day time sleepiness), were screened using attended in laboratory polysomnography (PSG) while monitoring pressure and airflow via a nasal mask with an attached pneumotach...
January 1, 2017: Sleep
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28356182/the-efficacy-of-low-level-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-for-the-treatment-of-snoring
#19
Michelle A Guzman, Francis P Sgambati, Huy Pho, Rafael S Arias, Erin M Hawks, Erica M Wolfe, Tamás Ötvös, Russell Rosenberg, Riad Dakheel, Hartmut Schneider, Jason P Kirkness, Philip L Smith, Alan R Schwartz
STUDY OBJECTIVES: To assess effects of low-level continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on snoring in habitual snorers without obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). METHODS: A multicenter prospective in-laboratory reversal crossover intervention trial was conducted between September 2013 and August 2014. Habitual snorers were included if they snored (inspiratory sound pressure level ≥ 40 dBA) for ≥ 30% all sleep breaths on a baseline sleep study (Night 1), and if significant OSA and daytime somnolence were absent...
May 15, 2017: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: JCSM: Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28356131/treatment-of-infants-with-syndromic-robin-sequence-with-modified-palatal-plates-a-minimally-invasive-treatment-option
#20
Silvia Müller-Hagedorn, Wolfgang Buchenau, Jörg Arand, Margit Bacher, Christian F Poets
BACKGROUND: Infants with Robin sequence (RS) suffer from upper airway obstruction (UAO) and feeding problems. We developed an oral appliance with a velar extension in combination with functional treatment and appropriate feeding techniques, which was proven effective in isolated RS. As the above problems are particularly challenging in syndromic RS, we set out to evaluate our treatment concept also in these patients. METHODS: We searched our electronic departmental database to identify all children admitted to our department between 01/01/2003 and 31/12/2009 because of syndromic RS...
March 30, 2017: Head & Face Medicine
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