Read by QxMD icon Read

nasal CPAP

Jennifer Carns, Kondwani Kawaza, M K Quinn, Yinsen Miao, Rudy Guerra, Elizabeth Molyneux, Maria Oden, Rebecca Richards-Kortum
BACKGROUND: Neonatal hypothermia is widely associated with increased risks of morbidity and mortality, but remains a pervasive global problem. No studies have examined the impact of hypothermia on outcomes for preterm infants treated with CPAP for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). METHODS: This retrospective analysis assessed the impact of hypothermia on outcomes of 65 neonates diagnosed with RDS and treated with either nasal oxygen (N = 17) or CPAP (N = 48) in a low-resource setting...
2018: PloS One
Andrew G Miller, Michael A Gentle, Lisa M Tyler, Natalie Napolitano
BACKGROUND: High-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) use has greatly increased in recent years. In non-neonatal pediatric patients, there are limited data available to guide HFNC use, and clinical practice may vary significantly. The goal of this study was to evaluate current HFNC practice by surveying practicing pediatric respiratory therapists. METHODS: A survey instrument was posted on the American Association for Respiratory Care's AARConnect online social media platform in March 2017...
March 13, 2018: Respiratory Care
C Overbergh, S Installe, A Boudewyns, K Van Hoorenbeeck, S L Verhulst
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is being increasingly used in children of all age ranges. The limited number of commercially available masks especially in infants and young children may complicate its use and compliance. In this report, we describe our experience with the use of the Optiflow™ (Fisher and Paykel Healthcare) Nasal Cannula attached to a regular CPAP device in the setting of chronic CPAP use. This interface consists of a nasal cannula and was originally designed for the delivery of high-flow oxygen therapy...
April 2018: Sleep Medicine
Onintza Garmendia, Monique C Suarez-Giron, Marta Torres, Josep M Montserrat
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
March 9, 2018: Archivos de Bronconeumología
Matthew L Bradshaw, Alexandre Déragon, Pramod Puligandla, Guillaume Emeriaud, Anne-Marie Canakis, Patricia S Fontela
OBJECTIVE: To describe management practices and the factors guiding admission and treatment decisions for viral bronchiolitis across Canadian pediatric intensive care units (PICUs). DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Canadian PICUs. SUBJECTS: Pediatric intensivists. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: A survey using two case scenarios (non-intubated vs intubated patients) was developed using focus groups and a literature review...
February 27, 2018: Pediatric Pulmonology
H Ghrairi, I Khalfallah, N Abid, M Loukil
INTRODUCTION: Continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) is the standard treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). It produces substantial benefits if used for the appropriate indication and if patients adhere to treatment. METHODS: We conducted a prospective study of 103 patients treated with CPAP over four years follow-up. RESULTS: Our population had a mean age of 52 years with a sex ratio of 0.63. Face to face, individual education was provided in all cases...
February 2, 2018: Revue des Maladies Respiratoires
Srinivas Murki, Jayesh Singh, Chiragkumar Khant, Swarup Kumar Dash, Tejo Pratap Oleti, Percy Joy, Nandkishor S Kabra
BACKGROUND: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) is the standard noninvasive respiratory support for newborns with respiratory distress. Evidence for high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) as an alternative mode of respiratory support is inconclusive. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this work was to evaluate whether HFNC is not inferior to nCPAP in reducing the need for higher respiratory support in the first 72 h of life when applied as a noninvasive respiratory support mode for preterm neonates with respiratory distress...
January 23, 2018: Neonatology
Pona Park, Jinil Kim, Yoon Jae Song, Jae Hyun Lim, Sung Woo Cho, Tae-Bin Won, Doo Hee Han, Dong-Young Kim, Chae Seo Rhee, Hyun Jik Kim
Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most effective treatment modality, poor adherence still remains a problem for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) treatment and there is little evidence regarding how this might be improved. This study aims to analyze the anatomic and clinical factors of OSA subjects who failed to comply with CPAP therapy.The medical records of 47 OSA subjects who received CPAP therapy as a first-line treatment modality were retrospectively reviewed. The medical records were reviewed for demographic and polysomnographic data and anatomic findings of the nasal cavity and oropharynx...
December 2017: Medicine (Baltimore)
Juan Mayordomo-Colunga, Corsino Rey, Alberto Medina, Pablo Martínez-Camblor, Ana Vivanco-Allende, Andrés Concha
BACKGROUND: Nasal prongs are frequently used to deliver noninvasive CPAP in bronchiolitis, especially in the youngest children. A helmet interface is an alternative that might be comparable to nasal prongs. We sought to compare these interfaces. METHODS: We performed a prospective, randomized, crossover, single-center study in an 8-bed multidisciplinary pediatric ICU in a university hospital. Infants age <3 months who were consecutively admitted to the pediatric ICU during a bronchiolitis epidemic season and fulfilled inclusion criteria were recruited...
January 30, 2018: Respiratory Care
Vance Hartke, Amanda Gillespie, Libby J Smith, Ryan J Soose
Upper aerodigestive tract symptoms are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). It remains unclear whether continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) improves or worsens these otolaryngology symptoms. As therapy-related side effects limit CPAP adherence, this study aimed to determine if CPAP negatively affects voice, sinonasal, and reflux symptoms of the upper airway. Case series with planned data collection was performed at an academic otolaryngology sleep center. Newly diagnosed patients with OSA were evaluated before and 6 months after initiating CPAP therapy...
January 1, 2018: Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery
Scott A Sands, Bradley A Edwards, Philip I Terrill, Luigi Taranto-Montemurro, Ali Azarbarzin, Melania Marques, Lauren Hess, David P White, Andrew Wellman
RATIONALE: Therapies for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) could be administered based on a patient's own phenotypic causes ("traits") if a clinically-applicable approach were available. Here we present a novel approach to quantify two key contributors to OSA-pharyngeal collapsibility and compensatory muscle responsiveness-that is applicable to diagnostic polysomnography. METHODS: Based on physiological definitions, pharyngeal collapsibility determines the ventilation at normal (eupneic) ventilatory drive during sleep, and pharyngeal compensation determines the rise in ventilation accompanying a rising ventilatory drive...
January 12, 2018: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Nils T Songstad, Calum T Roberts, Brett J Manley, Louise S Owen, Peter G Davis
BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The requirement for prospective consent in clinical trials in acute settings may result in samples unrepresentative of the study population, potentially altering study findings. However, using retrospective consent may raise ethical issues. We assessed whether using retrospective consent affected recruitment, participant characteristics, and outcomes within a randomized controlled trial. METHODS: We conducted a secondary analysis of a randomized trial, which compared nasal high flow (nHF) with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for primary respiratory support in preterm infants...
December 29, 2017: Pediatrics
Rafaela G S Andrade, Fernanda M Viana, Juliana A Nascimento, Luciano F Drager, Adriano Moffa, André R Brunoni, Pedro R Genta, Geraldo Lorenzi-Filho
BACKGROUND: Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, oronasal masks are frequently used in clinical practice. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis of all randomized and non-randomized trials that compared nasal versus oronasal masks on CPAP level, residual apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and CPAP adherence to treat OSA. METHODS: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Medline and Web of Science were searched for relevant studies in any language with the following terms: "sleep apnea" AND "CPAP" OR "sleep apnea" AND "oronasal mask" OR "OSA" AND "oronasal CPAP" OR "oronasal mask" AND "adherence"...
December 19, 2017: Chest
Scott A Sands, Philip I Terrill, Bradley A Edwards, Luigi Taranto Montemurro, Ali Azarbarzin, Melania Marques, Camila M de Melo, Stephen H Loring, James P Butler, David P White, Andrew Wellman
Study Objectives: Precision medicine for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) requires noninvasive estimates of each patient's pathophysiological "traits." Here, we provide the first automated technique to quantify the respiratory arousal threshold-defined as the level of ventilatory drive triggering arousal from sleep-using diagnostic polysomnographic signals in patients with OSA. Methods: Ventilatory drive preceding clinically scored arousals was estimated from polysomnographic studies by fitting a respiratory control model (Terrill et al...
January 1, 2018: Sleep
Michele Sweet, Debra Armbruster, Erin Bainbridge, Brianna Reiner, Alai Tan, Esther Chipps
BACKGROUND: Maintenance of a patent airway while the neonate is on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nasal CPAP) requires vigilant monitoring and oral/nasopharyngeal suctioning. Currently, no evidence-based guidelines for safe suctioning in neonates while on bubble nasal CPAP have been published. PURPOSE: (1) To characterize the clinical and behavioral responses of neonates on bubble nasal CPAP in a level III neonatal intensive care unit following routine oral and nasopharyngeal suctioning...
December 2017: Advances in Neonatal Care: Official Journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses
Sharn Rowland, Vinod Aiyappan, Cathy Hennessy, Peter Catcheside, Ching Li Chai-Coezter, R Doug McEvoy, Nick A Antic
STUDY OBJECTIVES: To determine if the type of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask interface influences CPAP treatment efficacy, adherence, side effects, comfort and sleep quality in patients with moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). METHODS: This took place in a hospital-based tertiary sleep disorders unit. It is a prospective, randomized, crossover trial comparing three CPAP interfaces: nasal mask (NM), nasal mask plus chinstrap (NM-CS) and oronasal mask (ONM) each tried in random order, for 4 weeks...
January 15, 2018: Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: JCSM: Official Publication of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine
Andrea Lanza, Sara Mariani, Maurizio Sommariva, Chiara Campana, Annalisa Rubino, Michele Nichelatti, Paola Proserpio, Lino Nobili
BACKGROUNDS: Mask-related side effects can negatively influence adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Nasal pillows (P) can be an alternative to the standard nasal masks (N), although there are no data about their long-term efficacy. This study aimed to assess long-term effectiveness and adherence to CPAP therapy delivered with nasal pillows in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) patients. METHODS: A retrospective observational design involving a series of consecutive CPAP-naïve patients affected by OSAS...
January 2018: Sleep Medicine
Josep Masip, W Frank Peacock, Susanna Price, Louise Cullen, F Javier Martin-Sanchez, Petar Seferovic, Alan S Maisel, Oscar Miro, Gerasimos Filippatos, Christiaan Vrints, Michael Christ, Martin Cowie, Elke Platz, John McMurray, Salvatore DiSomma, Uwe Zeymer, Hector Bueno, Chris P Gale, Maddalena Lettino, Mucio Tavares, Frank Ruschitzka, Alexandre Mebazaa, Veli-Pekka Harjola, Christian Mueller
In acute heart failure (AHF) syndromes significant respiratory failure (RF) is essentially seen in patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema (ACPE) or cardiogenic shock (CS). Non-invasive ventilation (NIV), the application of positive intrathoracic pressure through an interface, has shown to be useful in the treatment of moderate to severe RF in several scenarios. There are two main modalities of NIV: continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and pressure support ventilation (NIPSV) with positive end expiratory pressure...
January 1, 2018: European Heart Journal
Gimbada B Mwenge, Ihsan Rougui, Daniel Rodenstein
Purpose of the study Periodic leg movements (PLMs) are found in 30% of patients suffering from OSA. Under CPAP, we observed that PLMs can increase, decrease, or remain unchanged. The predictors of these changes are not well established. Objective To determine the predictors of PLMs change under CPAP and its impact on long-term adherence. Materials and method The patients were referred to the sleep laboratory for snoring or sleepiness. A single PSG night has been performed before and after CPAP treatment. Data on medication used, comorbidities and ferritin level were collected...
November 20, 2017: Acta Clinica Belgica
Andrew J Goates, Daniel J Lee, Joan E Maley, Phillip C Lee, Henry T Hoffman
BACKGROUND: Parotid swelling is rarely caused by pneumoparotitis from retrograde insufflation of air into Stensen's duct. Previous reports have identified occupational exposures, self-induced habits, exercise, spirometry, and short-term positive pressure airway ventilation as causes of salivary duct insufflation. METHODS: We present 2 cases of pneumoparotitis in patients on long-term oronasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea...
November 17, 2017: Head & Neck
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"