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Jeffrey E Foy, Paul C LoCasto, Stephen W Briner, Samantha Dyar
Readers rapidly check new information against prior knowledge during validation, but research is inconsistent as to whether source credibility affects validation. We argue that readers are likely to accept highly plausible assertions regardless of source, but that high source credibility may boost acceptance of claims that are less plausible based on general world knowledge. In Experiment 1, participants read narratives with assertions for which the plausibility varied depending on the source. For high credibility sources, we found that readers were faster to read information confirming these assertions relative to contradictory information...
October 10, 2016: Memory & Cognition
Evelyn M Maeder, Susan Yamamoto, Lesley Zannella
The current study examined the effect of publicity about Canada's recent Not Criminally Responsible (NCR) Reform Act - legislation surrounding accused in insanity cases that purportedly aims to enhance public safety - on juror decision-making. In line with agenda-setting theory, we expected that NCR Reform Act publicity might reinforce certain fears about the insanity defence, dependent on whether it had either a positive or negative evaluative slant. Contrary to previous work on the insanity defence, participants in this study generally favoured a NCR verdict...
October 6, 2016: International Journal of Law and Psychiatry
Morag Allan Campbell
Puerperal insanity has been described as a nineteenth-century diagnosis, entrenched in contemporary expectations of proper womanly behaviour. Drawing on detailed study of establishment registers and patient case notes, this paper examines the puerperal insanity diagnosis at Dundee Lunatic Asylum between 1820 and 1860. In particular, the study aims to consider whether the class or social status of the patients had a bearing on how their conditions were perceived and rationalized, and how far the puerperal insanity diagnosis, coloured by the values assigned to it by the medical officers, may have been reserved for some women and not for others...
October 3, 2016: History of Psychiatry
Aqeel Munahi Almutairi, Tahir Ansari, Waqas Sami, Salah Baz
OBJECTIVES: Epilepsy is very common in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, occurring in 6.54 out of every 1000 individuals. The current study was conducted to determine the level of public awareness of and attitudes toward epilepsy in the city of Majmaah, Saudi Arabia. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: This descriptive study was conducted in Majmaah, Saudi Arabia. The study population included respondents derived from preselected public places in the city. Stratified random sampling was used, and the sample size was made up of 706 individuals...
October 2016: Journal of Neurosciences in Rural Practice
Bong-Kuen Cha, Dong-Soon Choi, Insan Jang, Byung-Hak Choe, Won-Youl Choi
Orthodontic tunnel miniscrews with and without TiO2 nanotube arrays were fabricated to improve the induction of new bone formation and osseointegration. To inject the drug of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein, tunnels in a conventional machined miniscrew were machined by a computer-numerical-control lathe. TiO2 nanotube arrays to load the drug were also formed on the surface of the tunnel miniscrew by anodic oxidation. To obtain clean TiO2 nanotube arrays, two-step anodic oxidation was conducted...
September 28, 2016: Bio-medical Materials and Engineering
Zachary D Zuschlag, Callie J Lalich, Edward B Short, Mark Hamner, David A Kahn
The concept that fevers can improve the condition of patients with certain medical and psychiatric diseases dates back to Hippocrates. Over the centuries, it has been observed that fevers and infectious agents have been beneficial for a broad spectrum of diseases, including neurologic conditions such as epilepsy and psychiatric illnesses including melancholy and psychosis. Interest in the concept of fever as a treatment for disease, termed pyrotherapy or pyretotherapy, peaked in the late 1800s and early 1900s thanks to the Nobel Prize winning work of Julius Wagner-Jauregg for his studies with malaria therapy for general paralysis of the insane, now more commonly referred to as neurosyphilis...
September 2016: Journal of Psychiatric Practice
Monica Marie Nelson
PURPOSE: The purpose of this focused ethnography was to describe the culture of care and nonpharmacologic nursing interventions performed by NICU nurses for infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). METHOD: Roper and Shapira's framework for the analysis included participant observation, individual interviews, and examination of existing documents. SAMPLE: Twelve full-time nurses were observed and interviewed. RESULTS: Results described the culture of care provided to infants with NAS by NICU nurses as evidenced by six themes: learn the baby (routine care, comfort care, environment, adequate rest and sleep, feeding), core team relationships (support, interpersonal relationships), role satisfaction (nurturer/comforter, becoming an expert), grief, making a difference (wonderful insanity, critical to them), and education and care of the mother...
2016: Neonatal Network: NN
Christoph Flückiger, Hansjörg Znoj, Andreea Vîslă
Since the programmatic Rosenhan study, there is a broad discussion of how to actively construct clinical realities on both "insane" and "sane" perspectives. To inform patients about the output of the psychometric questionnaires assessed at intake is a required task in many clinical routines. Information processing bias toward psychopathology may impact many clinical communications and thus lead to clinical errors. Based on an output of the commonly used Symptom Check List 90, case examples demonstrate various grades of balanced and unbalanced alternatives of how to consider the psychopathological as well as the unproblematic poles of Likert scales in discussing psychometric questionnaires at Session 1...
September 2016: Psychotherapy
Jade Shepherd
Through an examination of previously unseen archival records, including patients' letters, this article examines the treatment and experiences of patients in late Victorian Broadmoor Criminal Lunatic Asylum and stakes the place of this institution within the broader history of therapeutic regimes in British asylums. Two main arguments are put forth. The first relates to the evolution of treatment in Victorian asylums. Historians tend to agree that in the 1860s and 1870s 'psychiatric pessimism' took hold, as the optimism that had accompanied the growth of moral treatment, along with its promise of a cure for insanity, abated...
October 2016: Medical History
Meron Awraris Gebrewold, Fikre Enquselassie, Redda Teklehaimanot, Seid Ali Gugssa
BACKGROUND: In Ethiopia where the burden of epilepsy is highest among school age children and teenagers, and where people with epilepsy (PWE) and their relatives suffers from high level of perceived stigma, there had not been any study that assessed the knowledge, attitude and practice of teachers towards PWE. This study aims to assess and understand the social and demographic determinants of knowledge, attitude and practice of teachers towards PLW in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. METHODS: Multistage cluster sampling procedure was used to identify twenty schools from three sub cities of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia...
September 8, 2016: BMC Neurology
Kumiko Ando, Takahiro Soshi, Kanako Nakazawa, Takamasa Noda, Takayuki Okada
The Medical Treatment and Supervision Act (MTSA) was enacted in 2005 in Japan to promote the reintegration of clinical offenders with mental disorders into society. Under the MTSA, individuals who committed serious crimes in a state of insanity or diminished responsibility are diverted from the criminal justice system to the mental health system. Based on court decisions about MTSA-based treatment, clinical offenders have an obligation to engage in rehabilitation within their local community under the guidance of mental health professionals...
2016: Frontiers in Psychiatry
Mervyn J Eadie
Increasing interest into the relationship between Ammon's horn sclerosis (hippocampal sclerosis) and epilepsy seems to have developed after 1880 when Sommer's paper appeared. Bouchet and Cazauvieilh had published the original description of the hippocampal anatomical abnormality in 1825 while attempting to locate the cerebral sites of origin of epilepsy and insanity. However, they offered no interpretation of the significance of the structural change. What has sometimes not been noticed in the subsequent literature is that, after a further investigation, in 1853, Bouchet described the change in 18 of 43 additional brains from persons with epilepsy...
September 7, 2016: Journal of the History of the Neurosciences
Samuel Adjorlolo, Inusah Abdul-Nasiru, Heng Choon Oliver Chan, Laryea Efua Bambi
Mental health professionals' attitudes toward offenders with mental illness have significant implications for the quality of care and treatment rendered, making it imperative for these professionals to be aware of their attitudes. Yet, this topical issue has received little research attention. Consequently, the present study investigates attitudes toward offenders with mental illness (insanity acquittees) in a sample of 113 registered mental health nurses in Ghana. Using a cross-sectional survey and self-report methodology, the participants respond to measures of attitudes toward offenders with mental illness, attitudes toward mental illness, conviction proneness, and criminal blameworthiness...
September 2, 2016: International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology
Kenneth S Kendler, Eric J Engstrom
The nosology for major psychiatric disorders developed by Emil Kraepelin in the 1890s has substantially shaped psychiatry. His theories, however, did not arise de novo, being strongly influenced by Karl Kahlbaum and Ewald Hecker. From the 1860-1880s, they articulated a paradigm shift in the conceptualization of psychiatric diagnosis, from symptom-based syndromes, popular since the late 18th century, to proto-disease entities. This effort was influenced by parallel developments in general medicine, especially the rise of bacterial theories of disease where different syndromes had distinctive symptoms, courses, and etiologies...
August 13, 2016: American Journal of Psychiatry
Stephen L Thaler
Random connection weight disturbances within an assembly of artificial neural networks (ANN) drive a progression of activation patterns that are tantamount to the memories and ideas nucleating within the brain's cortex. The numerical evaluation of these pattern-based notions by another, more placid system of ANNs governs the magnitude of weight disturbances administered to the former assembly, that perturbative intensity in turn controlling the novelty of the resulting ideational stream as well as the retention of newly formed concepts...
September 2016: Medical Hypotheses
Yohan Trichet, Agnès Lacroix
We recount how Jean-Étienne Dominique Esquirol (1772-1840) gradually changed his position towards what Philipe Pinel (1745-1826) referred to as mania without delusion. Between 1805 and 1838, Esquirol moved from outright rejection, questioning the very idea of insane persons committing motiveless acts of violence without delusion, to relative acceptance. He eventually incorporated the clinical characteristics of mania without delusion in his description of homicidal monomania, dividing them between reasoning monomania and instinctive monomania...
August 5, 2016: History of Psychiatry
John Callender
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2016: History of Psychiatry
Pranjul Arora, Dhirender Kaushik
Benincasa cerifera (Savi.), belonging to Cucurbitaceae, is an annual creepy wine that posses highm edicinal value and istraditionally used as fruit and medicine throughout India. In Indian system of medicine, its fruit is used as nutritive, tonic, diuretic, aphrodisiac, styptic, vermifuge and in various diseases and disorders like asthma, bronchitis, insanity, epilepsy, dry cough, fever, urethrorrhea, syphilis, hyperdipsia and vitiated conditions of pitta, etc. Phytochemically the plant is found to contain lupeol, β-sitosterol, cucurbitacin B, iso-vitexin, etc...
July 28, 2016: Chinese Journal of Integrative Medicine
Anthony M Tarescavage, David M Glassmire, Danielle Burchett
Reflecting the need to prevent violence, structured professional judgment assessment tools have been developed specifically to assess the likelihood of future violence. These tools typically integrate data from clinical interviews and collateral records to assist in the conceptualization of violence risk, but objective psychological testing may also be useful in completing the instruments. The authors describe the advantages of using the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2-Restructured Form (MMPI-2-RF) in this manner with the Historical Clinical Management-20 Version 3 (HCR-20V3)...
July 25, 2016: Law and Human Behavior
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